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Anexa III.1.a. Programe analitice discipline de învăţământ Domeniul de licenţă: Inginerie Electronică şi Telecomunicaţii Programul de studii universitare de licenţă: Tehnologii şi Sisteme de Telecomunicaţii Limba de predare: engleza Forma de învăţământ: zi UNIVERSITATEA TEHNICĂ ,,GHEORGHE ASACHI” DIN IAŞI Facultatea de Electronică, Telecomunicaţii şi Tehnologia Informaţiei B-dul Carol I nr. 11 IAŞI - 700506 ROMANIA Tel: +40-232-270041; Fax: +40-232-217720 Syllabus Mathematical Analysis-part one 1. Lecturer: Cornelia-Livia BEJAN 2. Course type: DM EDIF101 3. Course structure: No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester C S L P Final examination C S L P Total I 2 2 exam 28 28 56 4. Course objectives: Give some mathematical tools which are useful for solving several mathematical problems, show some basic ideas which relate the mathematics studied in high school with some technical courses studied in faculty and provide a background to understand many applications of this theory. 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: - The chapter named The space of real numbers and its extension to k dimension is related with the course of Algebra, studied in the first semester. - The chapters named Continuity, Derivability and Partial derivatives are necessary for the other two couses of mathematics studied in the second semester. - Some tools given here are used also by technical courses studied later on. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills Basically, the learning outcomes are expressed in cognitive skills, by the ability of solving exercices and problems. 7. Teaching methods The lessons are exposed by following all the topics contained in Syllabus, supplemented with a lot of examples and several applications.

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Anexa III.1.a. Programe analitice discipline de învăţământ

Domeniul de licenţă: Inginerie Electronică şi Telecomunicaţii Programul de studii universitare de licenţă: Tehnologii şi Sisteme de Telecomunicaţii Limba de predare: engleza Forma de învăţământ: zi

UNIVERSITATEA TEHNICĂ ,,GHEORGHE ASACHI” DIN IAŞIFacultatea de Electronică, Telecomunicaţii şi Tehnologia Informaţiei

B-dul Carol I nr. 11IAŞI - 700506

ROMANIATel: +40-232-270041; Fax: +40-232-217720

S y l l a b u s

M a t h e m a t i c a l A n a l y s i s - p a r t o n e 1. Lecturer: Cornelia-Livia BEJAN 2. Course type: DM EDIF101 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total I 2 2 exam 28 28 56

4. Course objectives: Give some mathematical tools which are useful for solving several mathematical problems, show some basic ideas which relate the mathematics studied in high school with some technical courses studied in faculty and provide a background to understand many applications of this theory. 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: - The chapter named The space of real numbers and its extension to k dimension is related with the course of Algebra, studied in the first semester. - The chapters named Continuity, Derivability and Partial derivatives are necessary for the other two couses of mathematics studied in the second semester. - Some tools given here are used also by technical courses studied later on. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills Basically, the learning outcomes are expressed in cognitive skills, by the ability of solving exercices and problems. 7. Teaching methods The lessons are exposed by following all the topics contained in Syllabus, supplemented with a lot of examples and several applications.

8. Evaluation procedure: The final written work is 60% The activity during all seminars is 10% The activity during all courses is 10% The first test paper is 10% The second test paper is 10%. 9. Course content: a) Course

I. Introduction The set of real numbers, the n-dimensional Euclidean space, the closed real line ... 4 hours

II. Real sequences and series ______________________ ...4 hours

III. Limit and Continuity____________________ ...4

houres IV. Derivability for functions of one variable, Theorems of Fermat, Rolle, Cauchy,

Lagrange, L’Hospital, Taylor formula ... 4 hours V. Partial derivatives, Differentiation, Derivability of higher order, Taylor

formula for functions of several variables, the chain rule.............6 hours VI. Implicit functions, extrema, functional dependence.................2 houres VII. Sequences and Series of functions, power series ..4 .hours

Total: .28hours b) Applications 1. __The set of integers, rational and real numbers, the convergence of sequences, several

criteria for series: Abel, Dirichlet, Leibniz and so on __________________ 8hours 2. _How to calculate the limit, the study of continuity for functions of one or several

variables... 4 hours 3. Derivability for functions of one variable, partial derivatives, differentiation, derivatives

of higher order, applications of Schwarz Theorem , Graphics ...10 hours 4. Implicit functions, extrema, functional dependence.................2 hours 5. Sequences and series of functions.........................................4hours....

Total: .28.. hours

10. References: - Caraman, Sanziana "Lectures Notes on Mathematical Analysis", 2008 - Davideanu, C., Borcea V., Andronic B. "Advanced mathematical concepts", 1996 - Gelbaum, B. " Problems in Analysis", Springer 1982 - Berman G.N. "A problem book in mathematical Analysis", MIR, 1977 - Bejan C.L. “Capitole Speciale de Matematica”, Univ. Tehnica “Gh. Asachi”, Iasi, 1997 - Bejan C.L. , Negoescu N., Ursache F. “Capitole de Matematici Speciale”, Editura Gh. Asachi Iasi, 2002 - Birsan T. – “Analiza Matematica”, Univ. “Gh. Asachi” Iasi, 1997 - Chirita S. “Probleme de matematici superioare”. Editura Didactica si Pedagogica, Bucuresti, 1989 - Luca-Tudorache, R.”Analiza matematica”, Tehnopress 2005 - Marcus S. – “Analiza Matematica”, Editura Didactica si Pedagogica, Bucuresti, 1980 - Siretchi Gh. – “Calcul Diferential si integral”, Editura Stiintifica Bucuresti, 1985.

Signatures:

Date: 2010-11-29 Lecturer Cornelia-Livia Bejan Instructor

S y l l a b u s

L i n e a r A l g e b r a 1. Lecturer: Professor Constantin FETECAU2. Course type: DF; DM EDIF102 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week Final examination No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P C S L P Total I 3 2 - - Exam 42 28 - - 70

4. Course objectives: First objective is to give mathematical knowledge to students that are necessary to understand the fundamental and speciality subjects. The second objective is to form a logical thinking and improve their calculus capacity. 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The framing of the “Algebra, analytical and differential geometry” discipline in the syllabus of the faculty is in accordance with its study program. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills It contributes to formation a theoretical base for assimilation the given knowledge at other disciplines of specility and general technique culture. 7. Teaching methods Lectures are freely and clearly presented and contain theoretical notions and adequate examples. They are adapted to the level of preparation of the students, in the limit of the allocate time. 8. Evaluation procedure:

In-class evaluation: Percentage from the final grade: 20% Partial exams: Percentage from the final grade: 10% Homework: Percentage from the final grade: 10% Final exam: Percentage from the final grade: 60% 9. Course content: a) COURSE I. INTRODUCTION 2 hours II. LINEAR ALGEBRA - Vectorial spaces (Linear dependence and independence of a system of vectors); - Base in a n-dimensional vectorial space, examples;

16 hours

- Real Euclidian spaces (Orthonormal bases); - Linear transformations. The kernel and the image of a linear transformation; - Eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a linear transformation; - Linear, bilinear and quadratic forms. III. VECTORIAL ALGEBRA - Free vectors in plane and space; - Products of vectors and vectorial equations.

6 hours

IV. APLICATIONS OF LINEAR ALGEBRA IN GEOMETRY - Lines and planes in space; - Parallelism and orthogonality conditions.

4 hours

TOTAL 28 hours b) SEMINAR I. LINEAR ALGEBRA - Linear dependence an independence of a system of vectors; - Base in a n-dimensional vectorial space, examples; - Orthonormal bases; - Linear transformations. The kernel and the image of a linear transformation; - Eigenvectors and eigenvalues for a linear transformation; - Linear, bilinear and quadratic forms; - Reduced expression of a quadratic form; - The reduced expression of a quadratic form in an orthonormal base.

18 hours

II. VECTORIAL ALGEBRA - Products of vectors (inner product, vectorial product, mixed and double vectorial product of three vectors); - Vectorial equations and systems of vectorial equations.

6 hours

III. APLICATIONS OF LINEAR ALGEBRA IN GEOMETRY - Lines and planes in space; - Parallelism and orthogonality conditions.

4 hours

TOTAL 28 hours 10. References: 1. A.Carausu: Linear algebra.Theory an Applications, Matrix Rom, Bucuresti 1999

2. C.Udriste, V.Balan: Linear Algebra and Analysis, Geometry ,Balkan Press 2005

3. C. Fetecău, 2006, Algebra liniara si geometrie diferentiala, Editura TEHNICA – INFO Chisinau, ISBN 978-9975-63-281-2.

4. A. Vieru, C. Fetecau, 2006, Probleme de algebra liniara si geometrie diferentiala, Editura TEHNICA – INFO Chisinau, ISBN 978-9975-63-288-1.

Date: 20-11-2010

Lecturer: Professor PhD Constantin FETECAU

S y l l a b u s

PHYSICS I 1. Lecturer: Physicist GABRIELA APREOTESEI, PhD. 2. Course type: DM EDIF103 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 1 2 2 1 - E 28 28 14 - 70

4. Course objectives: - Presentation of the most important physical phenomena, emphasizing these phenomena with applications in Electronics and Information Technology - Helping the students to acquire competencies in performing measurements and processing the experimental data - Student learning of the fundamental laws of physics and their applications in technics - Presentation of some methods for evaluation the measurement accuracy using adequate computer programs. 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: - At the 'Physics I' course are used the mathematics knowledge cumulated in the high school (Linear Algebra and Analytical Geometry, respectively Mathematical Analysis and Differential Equations) - The notions taught at the 'Physics I' course are necessary for the technical disciplines studied in the following semesters. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills By attending the 'Physics I' course, students will cumulate theoretical and practical knowledge for their engineering career. Studying and understanding of the fundamental processes in physics science is necessary for the new technologies development. 7. Teaching methods - Lecture; oral presentation. Lab activity is a half groups activity. The seminar and laboratory activities are programmed for 2 hours every 2 weeks. - The individual study of some themes using the references is recommended, developing their applicative part, in order to extend the knowledge area of the course.

8. Evaluation procedure: Continuous evaluation: Seminar activities: 15% of the final grade. Traditional evaluation. Laboratory activities: 15% of the final grade. Traditional evaluation. Final evaluation is performed on an exam:

I. Oral answers – 70% of the final grade. II. Laboratory activity – 15% of the final grade. III. Seminar activity – 15% of the final grade. 9. Course content:

a) CourseI. Introduction 2 hours - course content - fundamental interactions II. Fundamental principles of the Newtonian Mechanics 2 hours

- the fundamental law of dynamics - notions and quantities in the classic dynamics - conservative forces; the potential energy - conservation laws

III. Mechanical Oscillations 6 hours - the free harmonic oscillation - composition of the harmonic oscillations - the attenuated oscillatory motion - the forced oscillations; resonance - analogy between mechanical and electrical oscillations

IV. Mechanical Waves 8 hours - general notions - the plane progressive wave; equation of the plane wave - the differential equation of wave - the propagation velocity of elastic wave - the power and the intensity of the wave - interference of waves; stationary waves - dispersion of waves; wave group velocity - the acoustic wave; acoustic field; acoustic pressure; the qualities of sound - attenuation and absorption of sound; reverberation of sound - the acoustic Doppler effect - ultrasonic waves; applications of the ultrasound

V. Theory of Relativity 4 hours - theory of relativity in classical physics - postulates of the theory of restricted relativity; the Lorentz-Einstein transformations - relativistic dynamics

VI. Wave Optics 6 hours - interference of light; coherence conditions - interference of light with unlocalized interference fringes; Young’s slits - interference of light with localized interference fringes; equal-tilt interference

fringes; equal thickness interference fringes - applications of the interference phenomenon - diffraction of the light; fundamental notions; Huygens-Fresnel principle - Fraunhofer diffraction; the diffraction grating - reflection of light; refraction of light; optical fiber - polarization of light; natural (unpolarized) light; polarized light - analysis of the linear polarized light; the polarizer; the Malus’s law. - polarization of light by reflection and refraction; the Brewster’s law - the birefringence (double refraction); polarization and dichroism effects - rotatory polarization (natural optical activity); the Faraday’s effect - artificial birefringence: mechanical birefringence (Seebeck effect), electric

birefringence (Kerr effect), magnetic birefringence (Cotton-Mouton effect) - dispersion of the electromagnetic waves

Total: 28 hours

b) Applications: b1) Seminar activities: 1. Vector Computation 2 hours 2. Mechanical Oscillations 3 hours 3. Mechanical Waves 3 hours 4. Acoustics 2 hours 5. Theory of Relativity 2 hours 6. Wave Optics 2 hours

Total: 14 hours b2) Laboratory activities 1. Methods of processing the experimental data and error analysis 2 hours 2. Study of the vibratory string 2 hours 3. Study of the composition of the perpendicular harmonic oscillations having the same frequency. Determination of the sound velocity in the air. 2 hours 4. Determination of the specific charge of the electron by the magnetron method. Determination of the specific charge of the electron using the diode’s 3/2 law. 2 hours 5. Interference of light in a thin plate. Newton’s rings. 2 hours 6. Determination of an optically active solution concentration with help of the polarimeter. 2 hours 7. Meeting for recoup. 2 hours

Total: 14 hours 10. References:

1. Gabriela Apreotesei, General Physics, Pim Publisher, Iasi, 2008 2. Gh. Călugăru, G. Strat, V. Bădescu, Gabriela Fosa (Apreotesei), Physics for

engineers, Vasiliana-98 Publisher, Iaşi, 2001 3. Berkeley Physics Course, Vol. 1-5, Didactical and Pedagogical Publisher, EDP,

Bucuresti, 1981 4. L. Landau, E. Lifsit, Statistic Physics, Technical Publisher, Bucureşti, 1988 5. R. Feynman, Modern Physics, Vol. 1, 2, 3, Technical Publisher, Bucureşti, 1970 6. D. Halliday, R. Resnick, Physics, Vol. 1-2, Didactical and Pedagogical Publisher,

EDP, Bucuresti, 1980 6. E. Luca, C. Ciubotariu, Gh. Zet, A. Paduraru, General Physics, Didactical and

Pedagogical Publisher, EDP, Bucuresti, 1981 7. C. Cotae, M. Agop, B. Ciobanu, Physics, Vol. I, Stefan Procopiu Publisher, Iasi, 1999 8. B. Ciobanu, M. Agop, C. Cotae, Physics, Vol. II, Stefan Procopiu Publisher, Iasi, 1999 9. E. Luca, Gh. Zet, C. Ciubotariu, A. Jeflea, C. Pasnicu, Mechanics, Statistic

Physics and Thermodynamics, Scientific Publisher, Bucureşti, 1995 10. E. Luca, Gh. Zet, C. Ciubotariu, A. Jeflea, C. Pasnicu, Gh. Maftei, Interactions,

fields and waves, Scientific Publisher, Bucureşti, 1996 11. Laboratory works, Vol. I, II, "Gh. Asachi" Technical University of Iasi,

1995/1996 12. Iulia Brînduşa Ciobanu, Gabriela Apreotesei, General Physics – Applications,

Pim Publisher, Iasi 2009

13. Gabriela Apreotesei, Iulia Brînduşa Ciobanu, Electricity and Magnetism. Optical Phenomena. Application., Pim Publisher, Iasi, 2010.

Signatures: Date: Nov. 30, 2010 Course titular: lecturer Gabriela Apreotesei, PhD. Applications titular: lecturer Gabriela Apreotesei, PhD.

S y l l a b u s Computer Programming and Programming Languages I

1. Lecturer: prof. Adriana SÎRBU, PhD 2. Course type: DF, DM EDIF104 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 1 2 - 2 - E 28 0 28 0 56

4. Course objectives:

This course introduces students to : - the structure and operation of computers - the analysis and design of computer algorithms - internal data representation - basic C Programming Language elements.

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The course is placed in the first semester, preparing the basic notions for the next programming discipline, Computer Programming and Programming Languages II and, together provide the necessary elements for the courses dedicated to signal processing using specialized circuits (digital signal processors and/or microcontrollers). 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following: - Demonstrate a familiarity with major algorithms and data structures. - Design medium difficulty algorithms - Write simple programs in C language 7. Teaching methods

Course : Interactive whiteboard and slides presentation Laboratory : Programming application, quizz

8. Evaluation procedure:

Laboratoty work : 20 %. Tests : 20% Algorithm design

Exam : : 60 % Solving two problems using IDE 9. Course content: a) Course 1. Computer architecture .......................................................................................................................................... 5 h 1.1. Hardware 1.2. Software – operating system level, programming languages system level, application programs level. 1.3. Programming languages 2. Algorithm design ................................................................................................................................................. 10 h

2.1. Structured programming. 2.2. Algorithms description : logic diagrams, pseudocode. 2.3. Control structures : sequence, decision, selection, while - cycle, do - while cycle, for-cycle. 2.4. Data types. 2.5. Top-down approach: procedures and functions.. 3. Internal representation of information in computer systems ................................................................................ 3 h 3.1. Representation of instructions. 3.2. Representation of numerical data. 3.3. Representation of alphanumerical data. 3.4. Arithmetical operation and calculus precision. 4. Introduction to C programming .......................................................................................................................... 10 h 4.1. The structure of a program, vocabulary, lexical units 4.2. Data types 4.3. Expressions 4.4. Standard Input/Output operations 4.4. Instructions Total: 28 hours b) Applications 1. Computer architecture. Functional Units. (2h) 2. Computer Networks. (2h) 3. Operating Systems – DOS Commands. (2h) 4. File Manager Programs. (2h) 5. Algorithm and Structured Programming. (2h) 6. Internal representation of data. Calculus Precision + Test (2h) 7. Integrated Development Environment – General Presentation. (2h) 8. Console I/O. Characters and Strings. (2h) 9. Standard I/O.(2h) 10. Expressions in C. (2h) 11. Decisional Statements (if + switch). (2h) 12. Cyclic Statements I (while + do-while). (2h) 13. Cyclic Statements II (for). (2h) 14. Test. (2h)

Total: 28 hours 10. References: 1. Schildt, H. C : The Complete Reference, McGraw-Hill Osborne Media, 2000. 2. William H., I. Press et. al. Numerical Recipes in C, the Art of Scientific Computing, - 2nd edition,

Cambridge Univ. Press, 1992. 3. Kernighan, B. and Ritchie, D. - The C Programming Language, Prentice Hall, 1995. 4. Roberts, E. The Art and Science of C- An Introduction to Computer Science, Addison-Wesley, 1995. Signatures: Date: 20.01.2011 Lecturer prof. Adriana SÎRBU, PhD Instructor (s) Iolanda ALECSANDRESCU, PhD Radu DAMIAN, PhD

S y l l a b u s

Computer-Aided Graphics

1. Lecturer: Tecla Castelia Goras 2. Course type: DF, DM EDIF105 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 1 2 C 28 28

4. Course objectives: The aim of the course is to make students familiar with office software suites as well as PCB design.

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and the curriculum: The main objectives of the discipline are to rigorously define the basic rules relating to: - writing technical papers and developing PowerPoint presentations - designing printed circuit boards 6. Learning outcome expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills Student is expected to acquire skills on printed circuit board (PCB) design techniques. 7. Teaching methods theory and examples – showing sample PCBs, video projections - Laboratory works – theory recap and design.

8. Evaluation procedure: 100% laboratory tests. 9. Course content: a) Course:

1. Microsoft Word (4 h) • Microsoft Word – structuring a project by using the outlines, editing

equations, working with macros and autotext, mail-merge (correspondence), tables (using table functions, sorting, table modeling etc.)

• Microsoft Excel –using functions, diagrams, sorting and filtering • Microsoft PowerPoint – making presentations (slide design, animations etc.)

2.The OrCAD Automatic Design (10 h)

• designing medium complexity applications, working with parts and

footprint libraries (using the existing libraries and designing of custom device libraries) (2 h)

• designing electronic circuits (4 h) - schematics drawing, verification, electrical documentation writing, schematic processing for PCB implementations.

• designing interconnection structure (6 h) PCB realization (defining the PCB contour, defining holes/fastening cuttings, device placing, interconnections, and verification.

• postprcessing (2 h) realization of gerber-type files.

Total: 14 hours Applications

List of Laboratory Works 1. Introduction to Microsoft Office (2h) 2. Applications in Microsoft Office (2h) 3. Test 1 (2h) 4. Introduction to OrCAD and OrCAD Capture (2h) 5. Managing Symbol Libraries (2h) 6. Test 2 (2h) 7. OrCAD Capture Basics (2h) 8. Drawing Low Complexity Schematics (2h) 9. Working with Busses. Designing Electronic Circuit Schematics obeying Basic Rules.

Hierarchical Electric schematics. (2h) 10. Introducing Tools in OrCad. Exporting from OrCad Capture to OrCAD

Layout/Layout Plus. (2h) 11. Introduction in OrCAD Layout Plus. Preliminaries to design. Realization of a PCB

starting from technology files. Allocation of foot-prints. Drawing the PCB contour, and fastening holes/cuttings. Study of placement modalities. Placement verification. Routing. Layout verification. Gerber-type files generation. (2h)

12. Test 3 (2h) 13. Foot-print design. (2h) 14. Test 4 (2h)

Total: 28 hours 10. References: 1. Shirley, Peter Fundamentals of computer graphics Wellesley, MA A. K. Peters 2005, ISBN 1568812698 2. Gathen, Joachim Modern computer algebra Cambridge Univ. 2003, ISBN 0521826462 3. OrCAD – USER’S Guide, Hillsboro, USA 4. T.Goraş, Software pentru birotică, ed. PERFORMANTICA, Iaşi, total pag 137, 2005 5. Ed Bott – Using Microsoft Office 97, Utilizare Microsoft Office 97, Editura Teora 6. Douglas Hergert – Excel pentru Windows 95, Gid de referinţă, Editura ALL EDUCATIONAL 7. OrCAD – USER’S Guide, Hillsboro, USA 8. P. Svasta & co. – Proiectarea asistata de calculator a modulelor electronice – mediul CADSTAR, Editura Tehnica, 1998 9. Vlad Cehan, Tecla Goras – Introducere in tehnologia subansamblelor electronice, Editura MATRIX 1998

Signatures:

Date: Lecturer (Tecla Castelia Goras) Instructor (s) (Tecla Castelia Goras)

S y l l a b u s C o u r s e n a m e E n g l i s h I A d v a n c e d L e v e l

1. Lecturer: Nicoleta-Mariana IFTIMIE 2. Course type: DC, DM EDIC106 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total I 1 C 14 14

4. Course objectives: The main objectives consist in developing various abilities, in accordance with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. By the end of the course the students will be able to

- express in a fluent manner different attitudes, opinions, feelings and give arguments, reasons, details to support their point of view

- use language effectively for social and academic purposes - understand complex reading/listening texts - summarize the information from reading/ listening texts - produce clear and well-structured texts on complex subjects, using various organizational

patterns and cohesive devices 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The objectives outlined above correspond to the requirements of the curriculum and to its main aim – that of training future specialists in the field of electronics and telecommunications, able to take part in social and professional interactions in international contexts. This correlation is achieved on various levels: vocabulary, concepts, topics, tasks, teaching methods and strategies. During the 28 contact hours allotted for the study of English, these objectives are met by means of good student attendance and active participation in class. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills Reading for gist. Reading for specific information. Understanding text structure. Guessing the meaning of words from context. Expressing opinions. Interpreting visual material. Structuring information in a coherent and well-organized text. Writing a report. 7. Teaching methods Main stress on methods and procedures that foster the students’ communicative competence in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Special attention paid to the use of interesting, relevant and authentic materials and tasks, meant to involve students both cognitively and affectively.

While various interaction patterns are used in class (individual work, whole class, pair/groupwork) the last one is definitely favoured by the teacher, because group work and collaborative learning have a positive impact both on the individual student and the group/ team he belongs to.

8. Evaluation procedure: Final evaluation: Collocutional examination (C) 50% Coursework 25% Continuous assessment 25% 9. Course content: Seminar

1. Introduction 2 hours 2. Interesting Lives 6 hours Interviews It’s a long story Against the odds 3. Personal Tastes 6 hours Makeovers Fashion Personal style 4. World Cultures 6 hours Traditional things Manners Proverbs 5. Socializing 6 hours Party time We’ve got to get going Social style 6. Consolidation 2 hours

Total: 28 hours

10. References:

1. Mc Carthy, Michael, Jeanne Mc Carten, Helen Sandiford, (2006) Touchstone 4, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

2. Matthews, C., Marino, J. (1990) Professional Interactions, Prentice Hall, New York.

Signature:

Date: Lecturer (name and surname) December 8, 2010 Associate Professor Nicoleta-Mariana IFTIMIE, PhD

S y l l a b u s

C o u r s e n a m e : Physical training and sport 1

1. Course leader: Lect. drd. Abălaşei Cătălin Petronel 2. Topic characteristics: DM, DC EDIC107 3. Contents:

Number of hours per week

Number of hours per semester Semester

C S PW P

Final assessment

C S PW P TOTAL I 1 V.P 14 14

4. Objectives of the topic: a) Strengthening of health and the harmonious development of the body b) Improvement of basic movement qualities c) Learning and consolidation of some basic procedures and elements in athletics, gymnastics, games, fitness, their appliance in bilateral games or individual activities d) Learning of some basic notions of rules in carrying on a sports competition e) Creations of habituation in respecting sports hygiene norms and learning of schematic physical exercise with daily and weekly schedule 5. Concordance between the objectives of the topic and the objectives of the training plan (curriculum): Physical education and sports come to fulfill the learning plan of this engineering profile, contributing at the more useful scheduling of leisure, in the creation of premises for approaching professional qualities in good health conditions and with increased working strength. It is a mobilizing factor especially for team work. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in knowledge, technical skills and abilities a. Knowledge Theoretical and practical knowledge required to develop activities at the respective course. b. Technical skills and abilities - To identify the structural and functional purpose of physical exercise, basic mean in physical education; - To identify the proper means of developing physical activity; - To know the meaning of specialty documents in organizing the learning process - To individualize the physical effort based on particularities, options and preferences; - To identify actions and to dose the physical means used depending on the team - To adapt the possessed materials to the student groups and working methodology. 7. Teaching procedures: - Repeated actions in different conditions based on pace, strength and complexity of the movements; - Individual practicing of different exercises, their application in team play; - Individualizing of physical effort and work based on options and preferences with owned materials 8. Evaluation system: Stages: Continuous assessment: a) type of imposed assignments: participating in non-representative teams activity in sport types

or in performance sport; b) means of working conditions for reaching the goal: sports hall, the used didactic materials

are from the basic equipment(barbells, fitness devices, materials for games) c) percentage of evaluation in the final mark. Specialty projects (applications) Final evaluation(T): preliminary examination

-grading of knowledge accumulated during the percentage 50% scholar year by comparative tasks, tests; -grading the regular and active participation in percentage 50% practical assignments, representative teams in sport branches or in performance sports. 9. Content of the subject: 9.1. Course 9.2. Applications:

Name of task and content Nr of hrs. 1)Athletics

• running elements • jumping and standing start technique • middle-distance running • jogging

2) Basic, aerobics and artistic gymnastics • front and formation exercises, walking and running variety, simple

ground exercises • game exercises and dynamic simple elements from acrobatic

gymnastics(rollovers, rolling etc.) • combined course paths with equilibrium elements, climbing,

transport • classic, modern and traditional dancing steps on the appropriate

music 3) Sport games: basketball, handball, football, volleyball, badminton.

• Basic positions, pacing and field crossing • Easy hits, serves, first-touch exercises, still and motion grabbing

and passing of the ball • Elementary technique action finishing exercises, marking

exercising • Global participation in games on small and normal fields with

different purposes 4) improvement of basic motion qualities and specific to some sport branches, by using some fitness, athletics and body-building

• Strength and muscular mass improvement by proper use of weights and barbells

• Shape adjusting exercises and turning fat into active tissue • Improvement of speed characteristics(reaction, repeating,

movement, execution) by specific exercises • Increasing mobility and fitness at different levels • Increasing stamina

Total 14 hours 10. Selective bibliography: a) LUMPKIN, Angela Physical education a contemporary introduction St.Louis, MO Times Mirror/Mosby 1986, ISBN 0-8016-2998-5 b) Budescu, Emil I. Fundamentals of biomechanics in sports Iasi Sedcom Libris 2005, ISBN 9736701530 c) Ionescu, A., V., -Exercitiul fizic in slujba sanatatii, Stadion publisher, Buc, 1971. d) Ulmeanu, Constantin, -Notiuni de fiziologie cu aplicatii la exercitiile fizice, UCFS publisher, Buc, 1966. e) Dragnea, A., Bota, Aura, -Teoria activitatii motrice, Editura Didactica si Pedagogica publisher, R.A., Buc., 1999. f) Teodorescu, Leon.- Terminologia educatiei fizice si sportului, Stadion publisher, Buc., 1973. Date: 29.01.2011 Position and name Signatures: Course leader: lect.drd. Abălaşei Cătălin Petronel

S y l l a b u s Mathematical Analysis II

1. Lecturer: Assoc. Prof. PhD. Liliana Popa 2. Course type: DF, DM EDIF108 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 2 2 2 Exam 28 28 56

4. Course objectives:

• To study integrals and their applications . • To generalize integrals, like improper integrals or multiple integrals • To study differential equations.

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: Previous courses like Algebra and Mathematical analysis I are mandatory and are recommended for the course of Mathematical analysis II. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills

• To develop the ability to compute a wide variety of integrals. • To have a well found knowledge of fundamental differential equations. • To be able to apply integral concept to the real world problems

7. Teaching methods The teaching methods are traditional; the students have to solve some problems during the seminary. The problems are chosen in correlation with the general level of the group of student.

8. Evaluation procedure: - The activity during the seminary is traditional and consists in problems solving. The weigh in the final evaluation is : 20%

- A mid term written paper, with the weigh 50 % in in the final evaluation, is given.

-The final examination is written paper with the weigh of 30_% in the final evaluation. 9. Course content: a) Course I. The Indefinite Integral. The Definite Integral. Changing the Variable in the definite Integral. Integration by Parts. Improper Integrals. Integrals Dependent on a Parameter.Applications of the Definite Integrals. 6 hours

II. Differential Equations. First Order Equations. Equations with Separable Variables. Exact Differential Equations. First Order Linear Equations. Linear Equations. 8 hours III. Line Integrals. The Independence of the Path of Integration. 2 hours IV. Double Integrals. The Double Integrals in Polar Coordinates. Green’s Formula. 4 hours V. Triple Integrals. Spherical Coordinates. Surface Integrals. Stokes Formula. Gauss-Ostrogradsky Formula. Vector Fields.The Curl and Divergence of a Vector. The gradient Fields. 8 hours Total: .28 hours b) Applications 6. Indefinite and Definite Integrals 6 hours 7. Differential Equations 10 hours 8. Multiple Integrals. Line Integrals. Vector Fields 12 hours

Total: 28 hours 10. References: 1. Partial differential equations and functional analysis the Philippe Clement Festschrift Basel [etc. ] Birkhauser 2006, ISBN 3764376007 2. Rudin, Walter Analiza reala si complexa Bucuresti Theta 1999, ISBN 9739909701 3. AGARWAL, Ravi P. Advanced topics in difference equations Dordrecht[etc] Kluwer Academic 1997, ISBN 0-7923-4521-5 4. N.P.Bali, N.Narayana Iyengar, 2006, A Text Book of ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS New Delhi [etc. ] LAXMI 5. B. Demidovitch and others, 1972, Problems in Mathematical Analysis, Mir Publishers, Moscow. 6. V. Brinzanescu, O.Stanasila: 1998, Matematici speciale, teorie, exemple, aplicatiiEd All, Bucuresti, ISBN 973-9337-87-2 7. N.Donciu, D.Flondor, 1998:Analiza matematica : culegere de probleme -RO,Bucuresti : ALL, . 2vol,ISBN 9739337899IS: ISBN 9739337902 8. C..Meghea, I.Meghea, 1997, Tratat de calcul diferential si calcul integral pentru invatamantul politehnic /RO, Bucuresti : Editura Tehnica. ISBN 973-3111368 9. L.Popa, D. Rou, 2003: Matematici speciale. Culegere de probleme. Ed Dosoftei, Iasi 10. L.Popa: 2004, Matematici speciale , Editura CERMI

Signatures:

Date: 21.01 2011 Lecturer: Assoc. Prof. PhD. Liliana Popa Instructor: Lecturer PhD. Daniela Rosu

S y l l a b u s

Special Mathematics 1. Lecturer dr. Silvia – Otilia CORDUNEANU 2. Course type: DF, DM EDIF109 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examinati

on C S L P Total 2 2 2 - - E 28 28 - - 56

4. Course objectives: • To introduce functions of a complex variable, define concepts as continuity,

differentiability, analyticity, line integral, singular points. • To introduce Fourier Series and their applications. • To introduce Fourier Series and their applications. • To introduce students to the Laplace transform method for solving linear ordinary

differential equations. • To introduce students to the Z-transform method for solving linear difference equations. • To introduce students to the second order partial differential equations. • To introduce students to some equations of Physical Mathematics. 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: Course objectives are perfectly related to requirements of other disciplines and the curriculum, offering information and skills necessary to form future specialists in electronics, telecommunications and information technology. This course is based mainly on knowledge gained from the disciplines of Mathematical Analysis, Algebra and offers a platform of knowledge for disciplines such as Signals, Circuits and Systems, Communication Systems. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills Cognitive, technical or professional skills • The knowledge of the theoretical base which is specific to this discipline. • The use of theoretical methods in practical problems. • Communication skills which are specific to this area of mathematics. • The ability to make a logical reasoning. 7. Teaching methods • Lectures: oral and written presentation. • Interactive solving of a large number of problems. • Teaching materials in electronic and printed format.

8. Evaluation procedure: • Continuous evaluation (Seminar activity): weight in the final score is 10% • Semester test: weight in the final score is 10% • The final evaluation (Written Exam): weight in the final score is 80% 9. Course content: a) Course

I. Function of a complex variable [15 hours] - Limits and Continuity; - Derivative, Cauchy-Riemann Equations; - Analytic Functions; - Line Integral in the Complex plane; - Cauchy’s integral Theorem and Cauchy’s integral Formulae; - Power series in a complex variable; Taylor and Laurent Series;

- Residue theorem; application to evaluation of real integrals. II. Fourier Series and integral [10 hours]

- Orthogonality of sine and cosine functions; - Trigonometric-Fourier Series; - The Fourier integral.

III Laplace Transform [6 hours]

- Definition, standard results, transform of standard functions; - Convolution; - The inverse Laplace transform, use of tables; - Applications to linear O.D.E,’s.

IV. Z-Transform [3 hours] - Definition and standard results; - The inverse Z-transform; - Application to linear difference equations, systems, and data sequences.

V. Second Order Partial Differential Equations [5 hours]

- Classification and solving of some linear, second-order partial differential equations;

- The method of separation of variables.

VI. Some Equations of Physical Mathematics [3 hours] - A case of the heat equation.;

- A case of the wave equation; - A case of Laplace equation.

Total: 42 hours b) Applications

. 1. Function of a complex variable [12 hours] 2. Fourier Series and integral [6 hours] 3. Laplace Transform [4 hours] 4. Z-Transform [2 hours] 5. Second Order Partial Differential Equations [4 hours] Total: 28 hours 10. References: 1. Jeffrey, Alan Advanced engineering mathematics San Diego, CA [etc. ] Harcourt Academic 2002, ISBN 0123825954 2. Horn, Roger A. Analiza matriciala Bucuresti Theta 2001, ISBN 9739909787 3. BELLOC, Jean-Claude Mathématiques pour l'électronique Paris Masson 1994, ISBN 2-225-84517-4 4. I. Şabac, Matematici speciale, vol. I-II, E.D.P., Bucureşti, 1965 5.V. Rudner, C. Nicolescu , Probleme de matematici speciale, E.D.P., Bucureşti, 1982 6. Gh. Ciobanu, Gh. Chiorescu, V. Sava, Capitole de matematici speciale, Editura Univ. Tehnice „Gh.Asachi” Iasi, 1999 7. I. Enescu, V. Sava , Matematici speciale, Rotaprint Institutul Politehnic Iasi,1981 8. C. L. Bejan, N. Negoescu, F. Ursache, Capitole de matematici speciale, Editura Univ. Tehn. „Gh.Asachi”, Iasi, 2002 9. L. Popa, Matematici speciale, Ed. CERMI, 2004 10. L. Popa, D. Rosu , Matematici speciale. Culegere de probleme, Ed. Dosoftei, Iasi, 2003

Signatures:

Date: Lecturer Lecturer dr. Corduneanu Silvia-Otilia December 1, 2010 Instructor Lecturer dr. Corduneanu Silvia-Otilia

S y l l a b u s PHYSICS II

1. Lecturer: Physicist GABRIELA APREOTESEI, PhD. 2. Course type: DF, DM EDIF110 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 2 2 - 1 - C 28 - 14 - 42

4. Course objectives: - Presentation of the most important physical phenomena, emphasizing these phenomena with applications in Electronics and Information Technology - Helping the students to acquire competencies in performing measurements and processing the experimental data - Student learning of the fundamental laws of physics and their applications in technics - Presentation of some methods for evaluation the measurement accuracy using adequate computer programs. 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: - At the 'Physics II' course are used the mathematics knowledge cumulated in the high school (Linear Algebra and Analytical Geometry, respectively Mathematical Analysis and Differential Equations) - The notions taught at the 'Physics II' course are necessary for the technical disciplines studied in the following semesters. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills By attending the 'Physics II' course, students will cumulate theoretical and practical knowledge for their engineering career. Studying and understanding of the fundamental processes in physics science is necessary for the new technologies development. 7. Teaching methods - Lecture; oral presentation. Lab activity is a half groups activity. The laboratory activities are programmed for 2 hours every 2 weeks. - The individual study of some themes using the references is recommended, developing their applicative part, in order to extend the knowledge area of the course.

8. Evaluation procedure: Continuous evaluation: Laboratory activities: 20% of the final grade. Traditional evaluation. Final evaluation is performed on an exam:

I. Oral answers – 80% of the final grade. II. Laboratory activity – 20% of the final grade. 9. Course content: a) Course I. Electromagnetic field. Electromagnetic waves 4 hours

- Maxwell’s equations - general notions - Propagation of the electromagnetic waves. The energy transported of the

electromagnetic waves. Electromagnetic spectrum II. Quantization and dual nature of the matter 6 hours

- Mass quantization; electric loading quantization - Thermal radiation. Energy quantization - Corpuscular nature of the radiation: external photoelectric effect; Compton effect; X

radiation - Ondulatory nature of the particles: de Broglie’s hypothesis; experimental

confirmation of the ondulatory properties of the particles; ψ wave function; Heisenberg uncertainty principle.

III. Quantum mechanics elements 6 hours - Stationary Schrödinger equation - The particle in one-dimensional potential hole - The particle’s passing through the potential barrier. Tunnel effect - Linear harmonic oscillator - Quantum statistics

IV. Quantum electronics 2 hours - Generation and amplification of the electromagnetic radiation - Einstein’s theory of the quantum transitions - Quantum generators and amplifiers - Holography. Applications

V. Condensed-matter physics 10 hours - Crystal structure and classification of the solids - Crystal defects: punctiform defects, extended defects; diffusion of the structure’s

defects - Electrons in solids: - electronic gas model; -quasi-free electrons model. Theory of the energy bands - classification of the solids by the energy bands - effective mass - Electrical properties of the solids: - quantum theory of the electrical conduction of the metals - hyperconductivity - intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors - p-n junction - metal-semiconductor contact. Schottky diode - Hall effect - thermoelectrical effects - internal photoelectric effect - photoconduction in semiconductors

Total: 28 hours b) Applications: Laboratory activities 1. Methods of processing the experimental data and error analysis 2 hours 2. External photoelectric effect. Determination of the Planck’s constant 2 hours 3. Study of the thermal radiation and experimental verification of the Stefan Boltzmann’s law 2 hours 4. Determination of the activation energy of the

intrinsic semiconductors . 2 hours 5. The study of the photovoltaic cell 2 hours 6. Hall effect. Determination of the electrical carrier’s concentrations in semiconductors 2 hours 7. Meeting for recoup. 2 hours

Total: 14 hours 10. References:

1. Harald Ibach, Hans Luth , Solid - state physics an introduction to principles of materials science, New York, Springer, 2003.

2. Rolf E. Hummel, Electronic properties of materials, New York, Springer, 2001. 3. S, M. Sze, Physics of semiconductor devices, Taipei, Taiwan Central Book 1981. 4. David Halliday,Robert Resnick,Jearl Walker, Fundamentals of physics, New

York, NY John Wiley & Sons 1993. 5. Paul A.Tipler, Physics for scientists and engineers, New York Worth 1991 6. Douglas C.Giancoli, Physics principles with applications, Englewood Cliffs,

NJ Prentice Hall 1991 7. Gabriela Apreotesei, General Physics, Pim Publisher, Iasi, 2008 8. Gh. Călugăru, G. Strat, V. Bădescu, Gabriela Fosa (Apreotesei), Physics for

engineers, Vasiliana-98 Publisher, Iaşi, 2001 9. Berkeley Physics Course, Vol. 1-5, Didactical and Pedagogical Publisher, EDP,

Bucuresti, 1981 10. L. Landau, E. Lifsit, Statistic Physics, Technical Publisher, Bucureşti, 1988 11. R. Feynman, Modern Physics, Vol. 1, 2, 3, Technical Publisher, Bucureşti, 1970 12. D. Halliday, R. Resnick, Physics, Vol. 1-2, Didactical and Pedagogical Publisher,

EDP, Bucuresti, 1980 13. E. Luca, C. Ciubotariu, Gh. Zet, A. Paduraru, General Physics, Didactical and

Pedagogical Publisher, EDP, Bucuresti, 1981 14. Laboratory works, Vol. I, II, "Gh. Asachi" Technical University of Iasi,

1995/1996 15. Iulia Brînduşa Ciobanu, Gabriela Apreotesei, General Physics – Applications,

Pim Publisher, Iasi 2009 16. Gabriela Apreotesei, Iulia Brînduşa Ciobanu, Electricity and Magnetism. Optical

Phenomena. Application., Pim Publisher, Iasi, 2010.

Signatures:

Date: January 26, 2011 Course titular: lecturer Gabriela Apreotesei, PhD. Applications titular: lecturer Gabriela Apreotesei, PhD.

S y l l a b u s Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering

1. Lecturer: conf. dr. ing . Iustina Zaharia 2. Course type: DT,DM EDID111 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 2 3 2 1 - E 42 28 14 0 84

4. Course objectives: - To provide an introduction to some of the widely used concepts in electrical and electronic engineering - To give the students knowledge of circuits theorems, circuits analysis techniques - To give the students the opportunity to develop practical experience 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills 7. Teaching methods Presentation on whiteboard and some presentations in powerpoint. Laboratories is performed on the equipement supplies and computers.

8. Evaluation procedure: The course will be assesed by exam (written test) 50%, two class tests 30% and continous assesement of laboratory work 20%. 9. Course content: First Year, sem II a) Summary of course I.1. DC linear circuits ...........................................................................…. …......20 h.

Circuit elements, graphs. Networks theorems. Analysis techniques. Energetic aspects. One port circuits. Two ports circuits.

I.2. AC linear circuits.......................................................................................…...…16 h. Sinusoidal signals, sinusoidal and complex functions, phasors, characteristics values.parameters of AC electric circuits. Analysis techniques. Special circuits. Phasor diagrams. Variable-frequency response analysis. Resonant circuits. Nonsinusoidal steady-state.

I.3. Three-phase electric circuits. ............................................................................…....4 h. Three-phase Circuits. Three-phase connections. Source/load connections. Analysis techniques. Power relathionships. Power factor correction.

1.4 Linear circuits with distributed parameters.Transmission lines ..............................4 h. Ecuations of transmission lines in sinusoidal steady-state. Main parameters of lines. Secondary parameters of lines.

1.5 Transient circuits.................................................................................................….12 h.

Initial - value theorems. First and second order transient circuits. The Laplace transform. The applications of the Laplace transform to circuit analysis. Transfer functions. Steady-state response. Fourier analysis techniques. TOTAL HOURS 56h.

b) Summary of laboratories First year, sem. II • Theoretical and experimental verification of electrical circuits analysis methods:

Kirchhoff’s lows, Ohm’s theorem, Nodal an loop analysis techniques. • Theoretical and experimental verification of Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems.

Superposition theorem. • DC one and two ports networks • RLC series and parallel resonant circuits. • Evaluation of AC linear electric circuits parameters with and without magnetically

coupled networks. • First order transient circuits , RL and RC and second order transient circuits like RLC

series. Transient EWB and MATLAB analysis. c) Summary of tutorials First year, sem. II • Application of Kirchhoff’s laws to DC linear circuits. • Nodal and loop analysis techniques. • Thevenin and Norton analysis techniques. • AC steady-state analysis. • AC steady-state analysis in circuits with magnetically coupled networks. • Application of the time domain technique to transient circuits analysis. • Application of the Laplace transform to circuit analysis.

10. References: • Monier, Charles J. Electric circuit analysis Upper Saddle River, NJ Columbus, OH

Prentice Hall 2001, ISBN 013014410X • Thomas, Roland E. The analysis and design of linear circuits Upper Saddle River,

NJ Prentice Hall 1998, ISBN 01353552797 • DORF, Richard C. Introduction to electric circuits New York, NY John Wiley &

Sons 1996, ISBN 0-471-12702-7 • C.I.Mocanu, Teoria circuitelor electrice. E.D.P. Bucureşti, 1980 • I.Timotin, V.Hortopan, A.Ifrim, M.Preda, Lecţii de Bazele electrotehnicii, E.D.P.,

Bucureşti, 1975. • N.Balabanian, Teoria modernă a circuitelor, Ed. Tehnică, Bucureşti, 1975. • H.Rosman, Gh.Savin, Circuite electrice liniare, I.P.Iaşi, 1974. • Gh.Savin, H.Rosman, Circuite electrice liniare în regim tranzitoriu, I.P.Iaşi, 1976. • Gh.Savin, H.Rosman, Circuite electrice neliniare şi parametrice, Ed.Tehnică, Bucureşti,

1973. • L.Goraş, Semnale circuite şi sisteme, Ed.Gh.Asachi Iaşi, 1995 • H.Rosman, C.Petrescu, Bazele teoriei câmpului electromagnetic, Vol.I. – Electrostatica,

Ed.Gh.Asachi, Iaşi, 1997 • H.Rosman, C.Petrescu, Bazele teoriei câmpului electromagnetic Vol.II – Electrocinetica,

Ed.Gh.Asachi, Iaşi, 1998.

• H.Rosman, C.Petrescu, Bazele teoriei câmpului electromagnetic, Vol.III – Electromagnetismul, Ed.Gh.Asachi, Iaşi, 1999.

• I.Zaharia, V.Varvara, I.Popescu, C.Temneanu, Bazele electrotehnicii, Vol.I, Circuite electrice în curent continuu, Ed. Cermi, Iaşi, 2003

• V.Varvara, I.Zaharia. C.Popescu, Bazele electrotehnicii, Vol.II, Circuite electrice în curent alternativ, Ed. Cermi, Iaşi, 2003.

• I.Zharia, I. Popescu, C. Petrescu, C. Temneanu, Bazele electrotehnicii, vol. III Circuite electrice in regim tranzitoriu, Ed. Tehnopress, Iasi, 2006

• I. Zaharia , Teoria circuitelor electrice, Ed. Tehnopress, Iasi, 2009 Laboratory handbook

Androne C., Popescu I., Balan D., Trifan Fl., Petrescu C., Zaharia I., Îndrumar de laborator de Bazele electrotehnicii, Rotaprint I.P.,Iaşi, 1989 Laboratory reports multiplied Electrical circuit labs, Cristina Temneanu, Iustina Zaharia, 2010, http://www.ee.tuiasi.ro/~ctemneanu/labs

Problems books: • Fl. Trifan, Câmp electromagnetic, Probleme, Rotaprint, I.P.Iaşi, 1986 • R.Răduleţ, Bazele electrotehnicii, Probleme, Vol.I, E.D.P., Bucureşti, 1983. • M.Preda., P.Cristea., P.Manea, Bazele electrotehnicii, Probleme, E.D.P. Bucureşti,

1980.

Signatures:

Date: 20.01.2011 Lecturer Conf. dr.ing. Zaharia Iustina

S y l l a b u s Computer Programming and Programming Languages II

1. Lecturer: prof. Adriana SÎRBU, PhD 2. Course type: DF,DM EDIF112 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 2 2 - 2 - C 28 0 28 0 56

4. Course objectives: The course provides essentials of data structures and special programming techniques with emphasis on numerical methods applied in electronic engineering. Students should be familiar with the C language basics. 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The course is placed in the second semester and, together with Computer Programming and Programming Languages I, provides the necessary elements for the courses dedicated to signal processing using specialized circuits (digital signal processors and/or microcontrollers). It also constitutes a necessary background for any electronic engineer career. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following: - Demonstrate a familiarity with major data structures specific for C Language. - Write complex projects in C language - Use the C Standard Library 7. Teaching methods

Course : Interactive whiteboard and slides presentation Laboratory : Programming application, quizz

8. Evaluation procedure: Laboratoty work : 30 %.

Tests : 20% Colloquium : 30 % Solving three problems using IDE

9. Course content: a) Course 1. Structured Types and Pointers............................................................................................................................. 8 h 1.1 Array 1.2 Structures 1.3 Files

1.4 Pointers 2. Procedural paradigm ............................................................................................................................................. 4 h 2.1 Functions 2.2 Call by value, call by reference 3. Storage classes and scope rules ............................................................................................................................ 2 h 4. Special Programming Techniques ...................................................................................................................... 14 h 4.1. Modular development 4.2. Graphic Library 4.3. Searching and Sorting Algorithms 4.4. Recursivity 4.5. Numerical Analysis Problems in C - linear algebraic systems

- function approximation - optimization methods

- Total: 28 hours b) Applications 1. Arrays (2h) 2. Structures (2h) 3. Files (2h) 4. Pointers (2h) 5. Functions and Pointers to functions (2h) 6. Test (2h) 7. Storage classes and scope rules (2h) 8. Searching and Sorting Algorithms (2h) 9. Graphics in C (2h) 10. Linear Algebraic Systems (2h) 11. Function Approximation (2h) 12. Equation Solvers (2h) 13. Numerical Integration (2h) 14.Test. (2h)

Total: 28 hours 10. References: 1. Schildt, H. C : The Complete Reference, McGraw-Hill Osborne Media, 2000. 2. William H., I. Press et. al. Numerical Recipes in C, the Art of Scientific Computing, - 2nd edition,

Cambridge Univ. Press, 1992. 3. Kernighan, B. and Ritchie, D. - The C Programming Language, Prentice Hall, 1995. 4. Roberts, E., The Art and Science of C- An Introduction to Computer Science, Addison-Wesley, 1995.

Signatures:

Date: 20.01.2011 Lecturer prof. Adriana SÎRBU, PhD Instructor (s) Iolanda ALEXANDRESCU, PhD

S y l l a b u s Electronic Materials, Passive Devices and Circuits

1. Lecturer: PhD. Lecturer Ţigăeru Liviu 2. Course type: DT, DM EDID113 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P Final

examination C S L P Total

2 2 - 2 - Exam 28 - 28 - 56

4. Course objectives: To develop theoretical and practical ability required to analyse and design fundamental electronic passive circuits; to achieve the fundamental knowledge of electronic materials structure and properties 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The proposed goals are corelated with the teaching program of the Facultz of Electronics, Telecommunications and Information Technology. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills

Cognitive skills: the students will achieve the basic knowledge of the electronic materials properties and structure, of the fundamental characteristics of the passive devices, analysis and design of the passive electronic circuits respectively. Technical or professional skills: the students will learn the basic elements of the electronic equipments structure and operation, how to measure the fundamental characteristics and parameters of the electronic circuits. 7. Teaching methods

Oral presentation at the blackboard and videoprojector. The teaching material is disscused with the students during the class hours. The discussed topics are presented in detail in the references.

8. Evaluation procedure:

Laboratory: practical test 40% Final exam: written 60%

9. Course content: a) Course Part 1. Electronic Materials 8 hours

Semiconductor and conductor electronic materials. Dielectric materials. Magnetic materials.

Part 2. Passive components. 10 hours The resistor. The capacitor. The inductance.

Part 3.Passive electronic circuits. 10 hours First order electronic circuits. First order electronic circuits.

Total: 28 hours

b) Applications 1. Introduction in laboratory electronic equipments I: the power supply and the digital multimeter. 2 hours 2. Introduction in laboratory electronic equipments II: the signal generator and the oscilloscope. 2 hours 3. The technical resistor. 2 hours 4. The technical capacitor. 2 hours 5. The technical inductance. 2 hours 6. Low frecvency transformer. 2 hours 7. The analysis of the first order circuits. 2 hours 8. RC passive circuits. 2 hours 9. RL passive circuits. 2 hours 10. The analysis of the second order circuits. 2 hours 11. The serial RLC passive circuit. 2 hours 12. The parallel RLC passive circuit. 2 hours 13. The Wien bridge. 2 hours 14. Practical test. 2 hours

Total: 28 hours 10. References: [1] J.Barthel, W.Pompe, H.Weithnacht,... , MATERIALS science for high technologies MASHTEC'90, ISBN 0-87849-612-2, Zürich Trans Techn.Publ. 1990 [2] Jerry C. Whitaker , The electronics handbook Boca Raton, FL CRC, ISBN 0849383455, IEEE 1996 [3] L. Tigaeru – Materiale, componente si circuite pasive – note de curs, http://www.etti.tuiasi.ro/mccp [4]. C. Orita - Componente si Circuite Pasive; editura Cermi [5]. C. Orita - Materiale Electronice, editura Cermi

Signatures:

Date : 20.01.2011 Lecturer : Liviu Ţigăeru Instructor : Dinu Patelli

S y l l a b u s

C o u r s e n a m e E n g l i s h I I A d v a n c e d L e v e l

1. Lecturer Nicoleta-Mariana IFTIMIE 2. Course type: DC, DM EDIC114 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total II 1 C 14 14

4. Course objectives: The main objectives consist in developing various abilities, in accordance with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. By the end of the course the students will be able to

- express in a fluent manner different attitudes, opinions, and give arguments, reasons, details to support their point of view

- use language effectively for social, academic and professional purposes - acquire and use technical vocabulary - understand and extract relevant information from ESP texts - produce a variety of clear and well-structured texts on technical and academic subjects, using

various organizational patterns and cohesive devices: instructions, formal letters, memos, academic essays

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The objectives outlined above correspond to the requirements of the curriculum and to its main aim – that of training future specialists in the field of electronics and telecommunications, able to take part in social and professional interactions in international contexts. This correlation is achieved on various levels: vocabulary, concepts, topics, tasks, teaching methods and strategies. During the 14 contact hours allotted for the study of English, these objectives are met by means of good student attendance and active participation in class. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills Reading for gist. Reading for specific information. Understanding text structure. Guessing the meaning of words from context. Expressing opinions. Interpreting visual material. Structuring information in a coherent and well-organized text. Taking notes. Writing instructions. Writing an esssay. Making an oral presentation. 7. Teaching methods

Main stress on methods and procedures that foster the students’ communicative competence in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Special attention paid to the use of interesting, relevant and authentic materials and tasks, meant to involve students both cognitively and affectively. While various interaction patterns are used in class (individual work, whole class, pair/groupwork) the last one is definitely favoured by the teacher, because group work and collaborative learning have a positive impact both on the individual student and the group/ team he belongs to.

8. Evaluation procedure: Final evaluation: Collocutional examination (C) 50% Coursework 25% Continuous assessment 25% 9. Course content: 1. Computers 6 hours Virtual Reality Systems Systems Software High Tech and Higher Education 2. Robotics 6 hours What Is a Robot? Robosaurus Will Robots Take Over Everything? 3. Consolidation 2 hours

Total: 14 hours 10. References:

3. English for Science and Technology (1996/1999) Cavallioti Publishing House, Bucharest.

4. Iftimie, N. (2002) A Practical English Course: Written Communication in Science and Technology, Editura “Gh. Asachi” Iasi.

5. Matthews, C., Marino, J. (1990) Professional Interactions, Prentice Hall, New York.

Signature:

Date: Lecturer (name and surname) December 8, 2010 Associate Professor Nicoleta-Mariana IFTIMIE, PhD

S y l l a b u s

C o u r s e n a m e : Physical training and sport 2

1. Course leader: Lect. drd. Abălaşei Cătălin Petronel 2. Topic characteristics: DM, DC EDIC115 3. Contents:

Number of hours per week

Number of hours per semester Semester

C S PW P

Final assessment

C S PW P TOTAL II 1 V.P 14 14

4. Objectives of the topic: a) Strengthening of health and the harmonious development of the body b) Improvement of basic movement qualities c) Learning and consolidation of some basic procedures and elements in athletics, gymnastics, games, fitness, their appliance in bilateral games or individual activities d) Learning of some basic notions of rules in carrying on a sports competition e) Creations of habituation in respecting sports hygiene norms and learning of schematic physical exercise with daily and weekly schedule 5. Concordance between the objectives of the topic and the objectives of the training plan (curriculum): Physical education and sports come to fulfill the learning plan of this engineering profile, contributing at the more useful scheduling of leisure, in the creation of premises for approaching professional qualities in good health conditions and with increased working strength. It is a mobilizing factor especially for team work. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in knowledge, technical skills and abilities a. Knowledge Theoretical and practical knowledge required to develop activities at the respective course. b. Technical skills and abilities - To identify the structural and functional purpose of physical exercise, basic mean in physical education; - To identify the proper means of developing physical activity; - To know the meaning of specialty documents in organizing the learning process - To individualize the physical effort based on particularities, options and preferences; - To identify actions and to dose the physical means used depending on the team - To adapt the possessed materials to the student groups and working methodology. 7. Teaching procedures: - Repeated actions in different conditions based on pace, strength and complexity of the movements; - Individual practicing of different exercises, their application in team play; - Individualizing of physical effort and work based on options and preferences with owned materials 8. Evaluation system: Stages: Continuous assessment: d) type of imposed assignments: participating in non-representative teams activity in sport types

or in performance sport; e) means of working conditions for reaching the goal: sports hall, the used didactic materials

are from the basic equipment(barbells, fitness devices, materials for games) f) percentage of evaluation in the final mark. Specialty projects (applications) Final evaluation(T): preliminary examination

-grading of knowledge accumulated during the percentage 50% scholar year by comparative tasks, tests; -grading the regular and active participation in percentage 50% practical assignments, representative teams in sport branches or in performance sports. 9. Content of the subject: 9.1. Course 9.2. Applications:

Name of task and content Nr of hrs. 1)Athletics

• running elements • jumping and standing start technique • middle-distance running • jogging

2) Basic, aerobics and artistic gymnastics • front and formation exercises, walking and running variety, simple

ground exercises • game exercises and dynamic simple elements from acrobatic

gymnastics(rollovers, rolling etc.) • combined course paths with equilibrium elements, climbing,

transport • classic, modern and traditional dancing steps on the appropriate

music 3) Sport games: basketball, handball, football, volleyball, badminton.

• Basic positions, pacing and field crossing • Easy hits, serves, first-touch exercises, still and motion grabbing

and passing of the ball • Elementary technique action finishing exercises, marking

exercising • Global participation in games on small and normal fields with

different purposes 4) improvement of basic motion qualities and specific to some sport branches, by using some fitness, athletics and body-building

• Strength and muscular mass improvement by proper use of weights and barbells

• Shape adjusting exercises and turning fat into active tissue • Improvement of speed characteristics(reaction, repeating,

movement, execution) by specific exercises • Increasing mobility and fitness at different levels • Increasing stamina

Total 14 hours 10. Selective bibliography: a) LUMPKIN, Angela Physical education a contemporary introduction St.Louis, MO Times Mirror/Mosby 1986, ISBN 0-8016-2998-5 b) Budescu, Emil I. Fundamentals of biomechanics in sports Iasi Sedcom Libris 2005, ISBN 9736701530 c) Ionescu, A., V., -Exercitiul fizic in slujba sanatatii, Stadion publisher, Buc, 1971. d) Ulmeanu, Constantin, -Notiuni de fiziologie cu aplicatii la exercitiile fizice, UCFS publisher, Buc, 1966. e) Dragnea, A., Bota, Aura, -Teoria activitatii motrice, Editura Didactica si Pedagogica publisher, R.A., Buc., 1999. f) Teodorescu, Leon.- Terminologia educatiei fizice si sportului, Stadion publisher, Buc., 1973. Date: 29.01.2011 Position and name Signatures: Course leader: lect.drd. Abălaşei Cătălin Petronel

S y l l a b u s CAD Techniques for Electronics

1. Lecturer: Liliana Vornicu, Assist. Professor, PhD 2. Course type: DE, DT EDOD116A 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 1 1 -- 2 -- C - 20 min /

stud 14 -- 28 -- 42 4. Course objectives: Knowledge of the main aspects of electric comonents and circuits; Study the principles of operation for design; Familiarization with the main simple circuits in electronics and their applications; 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum The course objectives aim at acquiring competence on the functioning and the main design and technology of electronic circuits with power supply. These objectives correspond to the curriculum aims. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills The discipline aims at teaching students so that they acquire the knowledge and technical skills allowing a faster integration into the research, development and / or production activity in the design of electronic circuits. 7. Teaching methods The teaching methods include the lecture, with a presentation at the board and/or projector. The material used can be found in the selective bibliography indicated. The examination is conducted in written form, multiple choice test, requiring a minimum grade 5 to pass this discipline.

8. Evaluation procedure: Continuous assessment: Laboratory work / project - assessment of laboratory work is mixed. Share in final score: 25% Verification will be done in mixed mode, based on applications developed under the design theme. The lab evaluates the frequency and relevance of oral interventions - such as answers to questions and problems raised – and the involvement in the work done. On-going tests Share in final score: 10% Students take two on-going test. The test is taken on written form and it aims at assessing the theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the classroom and laboratory. Final assessment: Exam - the traditional type Share in final score: 50%

9. Course content: a) Course

1.Stationary Electric Current …...…………….……………..…………….... 4 hours Electric current in metal conductors. Electric circuit. Electric current intensity. Laws of the electric current. Electric voltage. Electromotor voltage. Resistance. Resistivity. Ohm’s law. Kirchhoff’s laws. Group resistors. Group capacitors.

2.Semiconductors ………….………………………………………...……. 10 hours Load carrier in semiconductors. Conductors, isolators, semiconductors. Intrinsec semiconductors. Electric conductivity in semiconductors. Energetically bands structure. p-n junction. Physical processes in p-n junction. Static characteristic for p-n junction. Types of semiconductor diodes. Bipolar transistor. Static characteristics. Temperature influence. Conclusions. Total: ……14 hours b) ApplicationsLab: 9. Overview of problems specific to the discipline of laboratory activities on

IE. Instructions for safety .................................................................................... 2 hours; 10. Semiconductor diode ………………………..…………………………………. 2 hours; 11. Zener Diode in stabilization scheme ……………..……………………………. 2 hours; 12. Rectifiers. Single and doubles alternation ….…………………………………. 2 hours; 13. Filters for simple circuits …………………………………………………..….. 2 hours; 14. Bipolar transistor …………………………………………………………….… 2 hours; 15. Final Discussions

Total: ... 14 hours 10. References: 1. V. Zamfir – Bazele radioelectronicii, Editura Flacăra, Timişoara, 1987 2. E. Ceangă, A. Saimac, E. Banu - Electronică industrială, Editura Didactică şi Pedagogică, Bucureşti,

1981. 3. P. Constantin, Şt. Bârcă Galăţeanu, C. Rădoi, P. Svasta, N. Drăgulănescu, Gr. Nelepcu, V. Ioniţă –

Electronică industrială, Editura Didactică şi pedagogică, Bucureşti, 1976 4. M. Ciugudean – Proiectarea unor circuite electronice, Editura Flacăra, Timişoara, 1983. 5. I. Ristea, C.A. Popescu – Stabilizatoare de tensiune, Editura Tehnică, Bucureşti, 1980 6. O. Tomuţă – Acumulatoare electrice, Editura Tehnică, Bucureşti, 1988. 7. F. Reif – Fizică statistică. Cursul de fizică Berkeley, vol. 5, Editura Didactică şi Pedagogică, Bucureşti,

1983. 8. N. Gherbanovschi, D. Borşan, A. Costescu, M. Petrescu-Prahova, M. Sandu – Fizica. Manual pentru

clasa a X-a, Editura Didactică şi Pedagogică, Bucureşti, 1987. 9. N. Gherbanovschi, Maria Prodan, Şt. Levai – Fizica. Manual pentru clasa a XI-a, Editura Didactică şi

Pedagogică, Bucureşti, 1987. 10. I. Costea, R. Dragomir, V. Croitoru, E. Sofron, D. Steriu, M. Profirescu, E. Olteanu – Electronică.

Culegere de probleme, Editura Didactică şi Pedagogică, Bucureşti, 1982. Signatures:

Date: October 1, 2010 Lecturer: Assist. Prof. Liliana Vornicu, PhD Instructors: Prof. Laurenţiu Dimitriu, PhD

S Y L L A B U S Internet Programming Techniques

1. Course lecturer: assistant professor Radu Florin DAMIAN, PhD 2. Course Category: DT,DE EDOD116B 3. Course structure:

Weekly number of hours Number of hours [semester] Semester

C S L P

Final evaluation

C S L P Total 1 1 2 C 14 28 42

4. Course objective: The objective of this course is to familiarize the students with the essential Internet related notions (applications, practical implementation, protocols, HTML coding). Effective use of the Internet is a "must" for an Electronics engineer and electronic communications are a de facto standard in today's world. 5. Consistency between discipline goals and faculty curriculum All courses in the faculty's curriculum can benefit from this course. Increasingly course materials for students can be found in electronic format (sometimes only in electronic format) on individual laboratories' web pages. The devices and equipment datasheets offered by supply companies and manufacturers steadily migrate from paper to full electronic format (over the Internet or on CD). Many other technical data are present in various forms on the Internet, accessing them being an essential component of the professional activity of an electronics engineer. During their future careers in electronics, students will inevitably find themselves in the situation to find information over the Internet and in turn to create such information. Also, communications over the Internet have become a mandatory component of professional or personal activities in all fields. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills 1. Cognitive skills: - use of a browser for internet browsing, advanced level (security, caching) - use of various methods of electronic communication, advanced level (e - mail client configuration, security, instant messaging, forum, blog, chat, FTP, P2P) - information ever the Internet, advanced (search engines, accurate methods, RSS) 2. Technical Skills - network planning, beginner level (physical implementation, devices, wiring, TCP/IP configuration) - coding/modifying HTML web pages, advanced - coding/modifying dynamic web pages, beginner level (CSS, Javascript, PHP, SQL introductory notions) 3. Professional Skills - implementation of datasheets/information in electronic format, medium level

- implementation of supervisory control and data acquisition applications via Internet protocols (SCADA), beginner level (user interface) 7. Procedures used in teaching:

1. The course consists of oral presentations using computer/projector, with the support infrastructure present in the classrooms of the Faculty. Students have the right to interrupt the exposure at any time with questions, followed by a dialogue between teacher and student on the topic of the question. 2. Laboratory activities begin with a short oral presentation to introduce the current theme, after which students apply and experiment with the concepts contained in the laboratory assignments under the guidance of the teacher. Laboratory infrastructure consists in a network of 10 computers connected to the Internet, laboratory assignments being available on-line: http://rf-opto.etti.tuiasi.ro. This type of activity encourages the dialogue between teacher and student, which becomes an important component of teaching process. 8. Evaluation system:

In semester evaluation: Laboratory activity

Weight in final grade: 17% Type: Mix

End of semester homework, projects

Weight in final grade: 17% Type: Computer

Final evaluation:

Weight in final grade: 66% End of semester evaluation Type: Traditional (written) 1. Written examination; HTML practical use; a) problem solving; b) traditional (written), all sources allowed; c) 40 %; 2. Knowledge test; network implementation, HTML, Internet communications; a) knowledge test; b) Computer, all sources allowed; c) 60 %;

9. Course content: a) Lectures

I. Introduction and history of the Internet 1 hour TCP/IP (IP address, network address, host address, IP address

decimal notation, the classification of IP addresses, static and dynamic IP addresses, routing)

1 hour

II Internet Protocol (routing, domain name) 1 hour Network configurations (peer-to-peer, client-server), network

topologies (bus, star, ring, mesh), network cabling (main cable 1 hour

types: coax, twisted pair, optical fibre), wireless networks. III Communications over the Internet (email, instant messaging, chat,

forum) 1 hour

Information over the Internet (browsing, file types, RSS feeds), data transfer (FTP, P2P networks)

1 hour

IV Information over the Internet (search engines), secure communi-cations (symmetric/asymmetric codes, public/private key, frequently used codes)

1 hour

HTML, Introduction 1 hourV HTML, Main tags 2 hoursVI HTML, Main tags 2 hoursVII Necessary notions for publishing pages on the Internet. CSS,

Javascript, PHP, SQL basics 2 hours

Total 14 hours b) Laboratory

I. General aspects of the networks (software and hardware, LAN, WAN), TCP/IP

2 hours

II Browsers, 2 hoursIII Search Engines 2 hoursIV Email 2 hoursV FTP 2 hoursVI HTML part I 2 hoursVII HTML part I 2 hoursVIII HTML part III 2 hoursIX HTML part IV 2 hoursX-XIII Individual work for the end of semester homework: coding a

personal page in HTML 8 hours

XIV Presentation of the end of semester homework 2 hours Total 28 hours

10. References 1. Microwave and Optoelectronics Laboratory, http://rf-opto.etti.tuiasi.ro 2. Matasaru, Casian, Damian, Utilizare Internet , Indrumar de laborator, rotaprint UTI, 2005 3. World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), http://www.w3c.org, HTML 4.01 Standard Signatures: Date: Course Lecturer: assistant professor, PhD Radu Florin DAMIAN

Instructor: teaching assistant, PhD Student Daniel Petre Mătăsaru

S y l l a b u s

R o m a n i a n L a n g u a g e 1

1. Lecturer: Assoc. Prof. Constanta Avadanei, PhD 2. Course type: DF EDLC117 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total

1 2 Oral examination 28 28

4. Course objectives:

The main objectives of the course consist in mastering both the active and the passive skills with emphasis on encoding, decoding and transmitting messages in fluent Romanian.

The achieve the above mentioned objectives we are going to stress on: - teaching the adequate vocabulary for beginners level / intermediate; - teaching elements of grammar (morpho-syntax); - developing the skills needed, later on, in using technical and scientific Romanian; - developing writing skills needed to produce different types of coherent texts; - developing communication skills (fluency and accuracy) on common topics; - developing translation skills.

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The objectives presented meet the requirements of the curriculum and of its main goal – that of training future specialists in the field of electronics and telecommunications, enabling them to participate in social and professional interactions. This correlation is achieved through training and guidance on multiple levels: topics, vocabulary, grammar, tasks and methodology. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills - recognizing the meaning of words from context; - reading for specific information; - recognizing the text structure; - expressing ideas; - organizing information in a coherent text. 7. Teaching methods In teaching and consolidation, we use such various and efficient methods and strategies as: a. classical (reading, translation, questions and answers, grammar exercises, etc.); b. modern (pair and group work, role play, etc.). Function of the level of study, we make use of teaching-learning strategies such as discussions and debates with stress on speaking skills. 8. Evaluation procedure: Final evaluation: Oral evalution ( C ) – 50% Continuous assessement – 50%

9. Course content: The content of the Romanian course complies with the curriculum for 1st year, begginers level students. At this stage, students will study general and technical Romanian, each unit focusing on one major skill and at least one other integrated skill. There are authentic reading and listening texts with a variety of tasks which aim at improving the students’ ability to comprehend spoken and written Romanian to write and speak in the target language. Each Unit will be taught in 2 hours. Syllabus 1st Semester

1. – Buna ziua! At the University The Alphabet

2. – Ce mai faceti?

On the Way to the University To Be and To Have

3. – Intre prieteni buni

Some Good News The Noun and the Article (Part I)

4. Viata studenteasca

The “Telephone” Better Late than Never! The Noun and the Article (Part II)

5. Viata citadina

At What Time ? Present Tense (Part I) The Personal Pronoun (Part I)

6. Impresii noi

A Surprise Visit Present Tense (Part II)

7. La cumparaturi

In Unirea Market The Past Tense (Part I)

8. Pofta buna!

Dinner at a Restaurant The Past Tense (Part II)

9. Cum e vremea?

Winter in the Mountains The Future Tense

10. Vin sarbatorile

Vacation Plans The Subjunctive 11. Radacini Family Album The Cases of Nouns (Part I) 12. Ce program ai? What is Your Schedule? The Cases of Nouns (Part II) 13. Craciunul la romani Romanian Christmas The Adjective (Part I) 14. Recapitulare Revision/ Consolidation 10. References: Rodica Botoman, Discover Romanian, Ohio State University Press, 1995 Date: 20.01.2011 Lecturer: Assoc. Prof. Constanta Avadanei, PhD

S y l l a b u s

R o m a n i a n L a n g u a g e 2

1. Lecturer: Assoc. Prof. Constanta Avadanei, PhD 2. Course type: DF EDLC118 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total

2 2 Oral examination 28 28

4. Course objectives:

The main objectives of the course consist in mastering both the active and the passive skills with emphasis on encoding, decoding and transmitting messages in fluent Romanian.

The achieve the above mentioned objectives we are going to stress on: - teaching the adequate vocabulary for beginners level / intermediate; - teaching elements of grammar (morpho-syntax); - developing the skills needed, later on, in using technical and scientific Romanian; - developing writing skills needed to produce different types of coherent texts; - developing communication skills (fluency and accuracy) on common topics; - developing translation skills.

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The objectives presented meet the requirements of the curriculum and of its main goal – that of training future specialists in the field of electronics and telecommunications, enabling them to participate in social and professional interactions. This correlation is achieved through training and guidance on multiple levels: topics, vocabulary, grammar, tasks and methodology. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills - recognizing the meaning of words from context; - reading for specific information; - recognizing the text structure; - ecpressing ideas; - organizing information in a coherent text. 7. Teaching methods In teaching and consolidation, we use such various and efficient methods and strategies as: a. classical (reading, translation, questions and answers, grammar exercises, etc.); b. modern (pair and group work, role play, etc.). Function of the level of study, we make use of teaching-learning strategies such as discussions and debates with stress on speaking skills. 8. Evaluation procedure: Final evaluation: Oral evalution ( C ) – 50% Continuous assessement – 50%

9. Course content: The content of the Romanian course complies wih the curriculum for 1st year, begginers and intermediate level students. At this stage, students will study general and technical Romanian,each unit focusing on one major skill and at least one other integrated skill. There are authentic reading and listening texts with a variety of tasks which aim at improving the students’ ability to comprehend spoken and written Romanian to write and speak in the target language. Each Unit will be taught in 2 hours. Syllabus 2nd Semester

1. Restaurante si Hoteluri The Cases of Nouns (Part I)

2. Profesiuni The Adjective (Part II)

3. O plimbare prin Bucuresti

The Cases of Nouns (Part II)

4. Arta modei The Imperative

5. In familie

The Personal Pronoun (Part II)

6. Viata la tara The Past Perfect (Part I)

7. Minte sanatoasa in corp sanatos

The Past Perfect (Part II)

8. In patria literaturii lui Eminescu The Possessive Pronoun

9. In patria literaturii lui Creanga

The Reflexive Pronoun

10. Viata culturala The Conditional (Part I) 11. Aspiratii si impliniri The Numeral

11. Stiinta Romaneasca The Conditional (Part II)

13. Corespondenta The Gerund

14. Recapitulare Revision/ Consolidation 10. References: Rodica Botoman, Discover Romanian, Ohio State University Press, 1995 Date: 20.01.2011 Lecturer: Assoc. Prof. Constanta Avadanei, PhD

S y l l a b u s

C o u r s e n a m e E l e c t r o n i c D e v i c e s 1. Lecturer: Associate Professor Mihail Florea Ph.D. 2. Course type: DT, DM EDID201 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 3 3 - 2 - E, 5k 42 - 28 - 70

4. Course objectives:

• Introducing of basic knowledge on the construction and operation of the main devices; • The study of the static and dynamic (small signal and large signal) operating conditions of the usual

devices and their switching behavior, emphasizing the parameters by which they are characterized; • The study of the theoretical and practical aspects of modeling of semiconductor devices including

their non-ideal behavior; • The presentation of some devices using examples that highlights the correlation between the devices

characteristics and the circuits performances, focusing on analysis and design of basic amplifier stages 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: On one side, this course requires a series of knowledge introduced in some previous courses like Physics, Materials and passive components and circuits, Fundamentals of electrical engineering or Signals circuits and systems and, on the other side, it contributes to the understanding of subjects from other courses, such as Computer-aided analysis of electronic circuits, Fundamental electronic circuits, Digital integrated circuits or Analog integrated circuits. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills Cognitive Skills: - The knowledge of the physical structure and the understanding of the operation of the electronic devices and of their behavior in different operating regimes; - The knowledge of the design and analysis techniques of some basic applications of the semiconductor devices using their models; - The knowledge of the parameters that characterize the semiconductor devices and the correlation between them, the models of the devices and the circuits performances; General Skills: - The creation of the basic capabilities of critical understanding, explanation, design and testing of some complex electronic systems or parts thereof; Specific Skills: - The creation of specific communication skills in microelectronics and electronics fields; - The creation of skills necessary to use the electronic circuits simulation software environments; - The creation of the electronic circuits analysis and design skills regarding the sizing and the stress assessing of the semiconductor devices. 7. Teaching methods Teaching the course is done by exposing the theoretical concepts accompanied by examples and applications and the projection of demonstration simulation or of materials available to students via the website. It seeks to initially understand the phenomena on an intuitive basis, supplemented by rigorous justification and demonstration of the key issues, highlighting the relevant issues in the engineering practice. During the lecture, an active dialogue with students is stimulated as a mechanism for setting the information submitted in the lecture. Applications are based both on the material taught in class and on the students indiviual documenting, guided by the teacher, the students having access to certain resources on the website of the discipline. The level of instruction, both theoretical and applied, is adjusted to the level of preparedness of students resulted from the dialogue during the course and the ongoing activities evaluation, focusing, on the one hand,

on bringing a larger number of students above the average level of competencies of the discipline and, on the other hand, on guiding the very good students to deepen their skills.

8. Evaluation procedure: Ongoing assessment: traditional Activity at: seminar and laboratory (share in final score: 30%) Tests on track: a mid-semester test (written test with two theoretical subjects and a problem - share in final score: 20%) Final assessment: Exam (written test with two theoretical issues and two problems – share in final score: 50%) 9. Course content: a) Course I. Introduction …………………………………………………………………………………........... 1 hour II. General Properties of the Electronic Devices .................................................................................. 2 hours III. Semiconductor Diode .................................................................................................................... 6 hours (Operation; equation; static and large signal regime modeling; bias; small signal regime modeling; basic diode circuits; electrical and thermal stresses, examples of circuits with diodes). IV. Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJT) ……………………………………………………………….. 6 hours (Operation; equations; static and large signal regime modeling; bias circuits; bias of BJT in integrated circuits; small signal regime modeling ; basic circuits with transistors; bipolar transistor circuits analysis, examples). V. Physical Processes in p-n Junction and BJT ................................................................................... 9 hours (Semiconductors; concentrations of free electrical charge carriers; the transportation of the electrical charge carriers through drift and diffusion; the injection of minority carriers; the pn junction structure and its operation in the equilibrium and perturbed regimes; the pn junction current equation; zener diode; tunnel diode; the BJT structure and operation). VI. Field Effect Transistors (FET) …………………………………………………………………… 9 hours (The structure, the physical processes, the equations and the operation of the enhancement n-channel MOSFET, of the depletion n-channel MOSFET and of the n-channel JFET; the p-channel MOSFET structure - CMOS technology; bias circuits; the FET small signal regime modeling; basic FET circuits; FET circuits analysis, examples). VII. The Switching Regime of the Semiconductor Devices …………………………………………. 6 hours (Physical processes in the semiconductor diode, BJT and MOSFET switching; the switching times definition; examples of switching circuits; CMOS logic inverter study). VIII. Other semiconductor devices and applications ………………………………………………… 3 hours (Thyristor, insulated gate bipolar transistor - IGBT, optoelectronic devices) Total: 42 hours b) Applications 16. Seminar 14 hours (solving problems with the content focused on the main chapters of the course, aimed at strengthening and the creative use of knowledge taught at course) 17. Laboratory 28 hours (the lab equipments operation, the static characteristic of the semiconductor diode at forward and reverse bias; simple diode circuits, diodes under small signal; BJT - static characteristics - determination of parameters of interest; BJT bias; mid-term test; basic BJT amplifier stages; two stage BJT amplifiers ; common source MOSFET amplifier; BJT under switching – applications; applications with thyristors and optocouplers; the final assessment practical laboratory test)

Total: 42 hours

10. References: 1. Adel S. Sedra, Kenneth C. Smith, Microelectronic Circuits-Fifth Edition, Oxford University Press, New York Oxford, 2004 2. Paul R. Gray, Paul J. Hurst, Stephen H Lewis, Robert G. Meyer, Analysis and Design of Analog Integrated Circuits-Fifth Edition, John Wiley & Sons Inc., New York, 2009 3. Allan R Humbley, Electronics, PRENTICE HALL, New Jersey , 2000 4. Course web page: http://dce.etti.tuiasi.ro

Signatures:

Date: January 25, 2011 Lecturer (name and surname)

Associate Professor Mihail Florea Ph.D. Instructor (s) (name and surname)

Asistant Professor Gabriel Bonteanu

S y l l a b u s S i g n a l s , C i r c u i t s a n d S y s t e m s 1

1. Lecturer: Liviu Goras 2. Course type: DT, DM EDID202 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 3 3 2 E 42 28 70

4. Course objectives:

- Presentation of the basic principles used in signal, circuits and systems modeling, and analysis. - Presentation of the principles of analysis of analog and discrete signals, circuits and systems and their

relationships. - Presentation of specific methods of circuit and system analysis. - Presentation of basic principles for temporal and spectral analysis. - Circuit analysis at the level of device and functional blocks.

- Linear systems response and orthogonal transforms 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The main objective of the discipline is to rigorously define the significance of basic concepts related to signal, circuit and system theory used in electronic engineering and to show their use in physical signals, circuits and systems modeling and analysis. Relationships with other disciplines in the curriculum are highlighted. Besides the mathematical approach, intuitive explanations are used. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills The student is expected to understand and to make connections between concepts and to acquire as well as to use them to analyze analog and discrete signals, circuits and systems in their relationship. 7. Teaching methods Black-board teaching – theory and examples. Laboratory works – theory, design and experiments.

8. Evaluation procedure: 80% exam + 10% laboratory tests + 10% final laboratory test. 9. Course content:

a) Course Chapter 1. From physical realities to models 1.1. Principles of physical signals, circuits and systems modelling. Models classification (linear/nonlinear, memory/memoryless, time variable/invariant, lumped/distributed etc.) and properties. (6h) 1.2. System elements (scalor, adder, integrator, multiplier and delay element) and circuit elements (resistive, inductive, capacitive and generalized, ideal and nonideal OA’s) Signal graphs. (8h) 1.3. Principle of signal analysis and linear system response to signals. Eigensignals and eigenvalues for linear systems. Particular cases - periodic signals. Functionals associated to signals. (6h) Chapter.2. Analog signals circuits and systems 2.1. Bode plots. Laplace and Fourier transforms. (6h)

2.2. Relationship between natural frequencies and time and frequency response of linear analog systems. (4h) 2.3. Analog convolution. (2h) 2.4. From analog signals and systems to discrete ones. Sampling theorem. Duality time-frequency formulas. (8h) Chapter 3. Discrete signals and systems 3.1. Linear discrete systems characterization and analysis. Discrete convolution. Z transform. (6h) 3.2. Discrete simulation of analog systems. (4h) 3.3. Discrete periodic signals. Discrete Fourier Series and principle of FFT. Circular convolution and applications in filtering. (6h) Total: 56 hours b) Applications 1. Models of laboratory equipment. (3h) 2. Analysis of memoryless (resistive/algebraic) circuits. (3h) 3. Applications of OA’s (memoryless - linear and nonlinear). (3h) 4. Fourier series. (3h) 5. Study of passive first order circuits. (3h) 6. Study of passive second order circuits. (3h) 7. Study of active first order circuits. (3h) 8. Study of active second order circuits. (3h) 9. Bode plots for higher order systems. (3h) 10. Relationship between time and frequency responses. (3h) 11. Sampling of analog signals. (3h) 12. Discrete Fourier Series. (3h) 13. Linear discrete systems analysis. (3h) 14. Individual test. (3h)

Total: 42 hours 10. References: L.O.Chua, C. Desoer, E. Kuh, Linear and Nonlinear Circuits, McGraw Hill 1987, A. Papoulis, Signal Theory, McGraw Hill 1977 L. Franks, Signal Theory, Prentice Hall 1977, S.K. Mitra, Digital Signal Theory, McGraw Hill, 2005 A. Mateescu, Semnale, circuite si sisteme, EDP 1984 L Goras, Semnale, circuite si sisteme, Ed. “Gh. Asachi” 1994

Signatures:

Date: Lecturer : Liviu Goaras Instructors: Radu Matei

Asist. Paul UNGUREANU, PhD

S Y L L A B U S Electrical and Electronic Measurements

1. Course holder: Lecturer Eduard Lunca 2. Course type:DT, DM EDID203 3. Course structure:

Number of hours per week Number of hours per semester Semester

C S L P

Type of final

assessment C S L P Total 3 2 - 2 - E 28 - 28 - 56

4. Course objectives: The aim of this course is to introduce the concept of measurement and the related instrumentation aspects as a vital ingredient of electronics and telecommunications engineering. The following major topics will be covered by the course:

basic measurement concepts; analog instruments; bridge measurements; digital instruments; data acquisition systems.

5. Consistency between course and curriculum goals: Recommended disciplines are: “Physics”, “Electronic Materials, Passive Devices and Circuits”, “Basics of Electrotechnics”. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical and professional skills Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to:

understand the principles and operation of different measuring instruments; know the construction of the instruments; select the appropriate instrument for measurement; interpret readings from different meters; know the precautions and applications of the instruments.

7. Teaching methodology: Methods: presentation, demonstration, heuristic conversation, experiment During the lectures, the students are encouraged to actively participate in learning the material as it is presented. They will be involved in clarifying key concepts and they will be asked to make connections with course topics. Materials used for lectures are: PowerPoint presentations, laptop computer and video projector. During the laboratory sessions, the students will work in small cooperative groups, sharing duties and responsibilities equally. The lab reports are written independently. 8. Methods of assessment:

(For all evaluation forms it must be specified the type: T – traditional, CC – computer based, M – mixed)

Continuous assessment:

Activity at seminar / laboratory / project / practice – M

Weight in the final grade: 15 %

Semester tests [1] – T Weight in the final grade: 10 %

Homeworks [2] – T

Weight in the final grade: 10 %

Final assessment: Exam Weight in the final grade: 65 %

Assignment(s): 1. Theme development, weight 40 % 2. Problem solving, weight 40 % 3. Knowledge test questions, weight 20 %

9. Course topics: a) Lectures I. Basics of measurement 4 hours I.1. Classification of instruments I.2. Static and dynamic characteristics

I.3. Types of errors I.4. Units and standards of measurement

II. Analog DC and AC meters 4 hours

II.1. Classification of analog instruments II.2. Definition of average and RMS value

II.3. PMMC – working principle, construction II.4. Analog DC ammeters and voltmeters II.5. Analog AC ammeters and voltmeters II.6. Analog multimeter

III. Bridge measurements 4 hours III.1. DC bridges III.2. AC bridges IV. Digital instruments 6 hours

IV.1. ADC and DAC concepts IV.2. Digital frequency meters

IV.3. Digital voltmeters IV.4. Digital multimeter IV.5. Digital LCR and Q-meters IV.6. Digital phase meter

V. Oscilloscope 4 hours

V.1. Cathode Ray Oscilloscope V.2. Digital storage oscilloscope

VI. Signal generators and analyzers 4 hours VI.1. Function generators VI.2. RF signal generators

VI.3. Sweep generators VI.4. Wave analyzer VI.5. Harmonic distorsion analyzer VI.6. Spectrum analyzer

VII. Data acquisitions systems 2 hours VII.1. Transducers

VII.2. Signal conditioning of the inputs VII.3. Single and multi-channel data acquisition systems Total: 28 hours b) Applications 1. Calibrating analog voltmeters and ammeters 2 hours 2. Extending the measurement range of an ammeter 2 hours 3. Measuring resistances using the VA-method 2 hours 4. DC Bridges 2 hours 5. AC Bridges 2 hours 6. Digital multimeter 2 hours 7. The study and use of the digital storage oscilloscope 4 hours 8. Testing the parameters of a signal generator 2 hours 9. Spectrum analyzer measurements 2 hours 10. Characterization of diodes and BJT transistors 2 hours 11. Measurements on amplifiers 2 hours 12. Using data acquisition systems 2 hours 13. Computer interfacing to laboratory instruments 2 hours Total: 28 hours 10. References (selection) 1. S. Tumanski, 2006, Principles of Electrical Measurement, Taylor and Francis.

2. W. Boyes (ed.), 2003, Instrumentation Reference Book, Butterworth-Heinemann.

3. J. McGhee, W. Kulesza, M. J. Korczynski, I. A. Henderson, 2001, Measurement data handling, Tehnical University of Lodz.

4. J.G. Webster (ed.), 1999, The Measurement, Instrumentation, and Sensor Handbook, CRC Press. IEEE Press, United States of America.

5. J.J. Carr, 1996, Elements of Electronic Instrumentation & Measurement, 3rd edition, Prentice Hall.

6. P.H. Sydenham (ed.), 1986, Handbook of Measurement Science, John Wiley & Sons.

7. Mihai Antoniu, Ştefan Poli, Eduard Antoniu, Octavian Baltag, Valeriu David, 2000, 2001, Măsurări electronice, Vol I, Vol II, Vol III, Editura Satya, Iaşi.

8. Codrin Donciu, Eduard Luncă, Mihai Creţu, 2005, Sisteme moderne de măsurare. Măsurări distribuite, Editura Politehnium, Iaşi.

Signatures: Date: 05.02.2011 Course and applications:

Lecturer Eduard Lunca

S y l l a b u s

Object Oriented Programming 1. Lecturer: prof. Adriana SÎRBU, PhD 2. Course type: DT, DM EDID204 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 3 2 0 1 1 C 28 0 14 14 56

4. Course objectives: This course introduces students to the object oriented programming paradigm, using C++. It provides necessary knowledge for developing medium complexity application in C++. 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: More and more, the electronic engineer career requires programming languages knowledge. As the object oriented paradigm is one of the most recent ones, it constitutes a more efficient tool in different areas involving electronics: DSP and microcontrollers programming, communication protocols, circuit verification etc. So, the course contributes to a solid preparation of the graduates future profesional careers. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following:

- Write complex programs in C++ language - Use the Standard Template Library basic components 7. Teaching methods

Course : Interactive whiteboard and slides presentation Laboratory : Programming application, quizz

8. Evaluation procedure: Laboratoty work : 20 %.

Projects : 30% Colloquium : 50 %

9. Course content: a) Course 1. Programming Paradigms and Their Evolution ................................................................................................. 2 h 1.1 Structured programming, modular programming , object oriented programming 1.2 Memory models 2. C++ as a Superset of the C language................................................................................................................. 2 h

2.1 Standard data types, operators, instructions and functions 2.2 Polymorphism using C language

3. Program Structure ............................................................................................................................................ 2 h

3.1 Scope, visibility and accessibility 3.2 Project architecture 4. Abstract Data Types ....................................................................................................................................... 4 h 4.1 Data and function encapsulation 4.2 this pointer 4.3 Constructors and destructors 4.4 Modifiers 5. Overloading ........................................................................................................................................................ 2 h 6.1 Function overloading 6.2 Operator overloading 6.3 Conversion operators 6. Inheritance and Polymorphism........................................................................................................................... 4 h 6.1 Class Derivation 6.2 Virtual Methods and Abstract Classes 6.3 Constructors and Destructors in Derived Classes 7. C++ Stream Input/Output ................................................................................................................................ 2 h 8. Templates ........................................................................................................................................................ 4 h 8.1 Function templates 8.2 Class templates 9. Standard Template Library .............................................................................................................................. 2 h 10. Exception Handling........................................................................................................................................ 2 h 11. Development and Design using C++.............................................................................................................. 2 h Total: 28 hours b) Applications 1. Integrated Development Environment. General Presentation. Preprocessing. (2h) 2. C++ , a better C. (2h) 3. Classes, constructors, destructors I. (2h) 4. Classes, constructors, destructors II. (2h) 5. Operator Overloading. (2h) 6. this Pointer. Friends. (2h) 7. Test. (2h) 8. Class derivation. (2h) 9. Polymorphism (2h) 10. IO Streams (2h) 11. Templates (2h) 12. STL (2h) 13. Exception handling(2h)

14. Test. (2h)

Total:28 hours 10. References: 3. 1. Stroustrup, B.,1991, The C++ Programming Language - 2nd edition,

Addison-Wesley Publishing Company. 2. Buzzi-Ferraris, G., 1993, Building Numerical Libraries the Object-Oriented Way,

Addison-Wesley Publishing Company. 4. 3. Stepanov, A. and M. Lee, 1995, The Standard Template Library, Hewlwtt-

Packard Company. 4. Documentaţia pentru Viscual C++ 5. 5. William H., I. Press et. al. , 1992, Numerical Recipes in C, the Art of

Scientific Computing, - 2nd edition, Cambridge univ. Press. 6. 6. Stepanov A., Lee M, 1995., The Standard Template Library Silicon Graphics

and Hewlett-Packard.

Signatures:

Date: 30.11.2010 Lecturer prof. Adriana SÎRBU, PhD Instructor (s) Andrei MAIORESCU, PhD

S y l l a b u s

I n f o r m a t i o n T h e o r y

1. Lecturer: Prof. Daniela Tarniceriu, PhD 2. Course type: DM EDID205 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 3 2 2 Exam 28 28 56

4. Course objectives: The objective of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and understanding of the central elements of coding theory (discrete sources, discrete transmission channels, information quantities, compression codes, error correcting codes). Specific objectives are:

− To introduce fundamentals of discrete sources and information measure; − To present discrete channels; − To develop source encoding techniques for noiseless channels; − To know unique decipherable codes of variable length; − To present basics of source coding for noisy channels.

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The discipline objectives are in agreement with the curricula aiming at transmitting information and creating competence for future professionals in the field of Electronics, Telecommunications and Information Technology. The discipline is integrated in the curricula for all specializations of the Faculty and uses in specific manner knowledge and methods that were introduced in the discipline of Mathematics, Signals, Circuits and Systems, Digital Integrated Circuits and is properly placed in the chronology of the curricula. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills Through lectures, homework, and laboratory experiments, students should have the following competencies: Cognitive Skills: Knowledge of theoretical and practical aspects specific to information theory (information source, transmission channel, source coding for noiseless channels, noisy channel coding, block codes). General Skills:

− Be able to understand, explain and interpret theoretical and practical aspects specific to information theory.

− Have specific communication skills; Specific Skills:

- To know specific models of information sources: without memory and with memory and to compute their information quantities;

- To know the main types of discrete transmission channels and evaluate the specific information quantities

- To know the procedures to implement and evaluate Shannon Fano and Huffman compression;

- To know and apply techniques for noisy channel coding. 7. Teaching methods The teaching methods combine lectures with explanations, discussions, case studies, in order to highlight theoretical concepts and specific applications. It allows connections with other disciplines, with information previously submitted and practical applications.

8. Evaluation procedure: The assessment is realized continuously, through practical laboratory and home works. The results are checked and analyzed. The weight of applications in the final grade is 25%. The final assessment is made by classical written exam, lasting two hours, with two problems and two issues of theory, with equal weight in the final grade of the thesis. The weight of the thesis in the final grade is 75%. Students have access to specific relationships to solve problems. 9. Course content: a) Course I. Discrete sources of information 4 hours 1.1. Discrete memoryless sources 1.2. Entropy properties 1.3. Extension of discrete memoryless sources 1.4. Markov discrete sources 1.5. Ergodic sources 1.6. Entropy of ergodic Markov sources II. Discrete transmission channels 6 hours 2.1. Entropy of the input-output jointed field 2.2. Conditional entropies 2.3. Relationships between entropies 2.4. Mutual information 2.5. Classification of discrete, stationary and memoryless channels 2.6. Capacity, redundancy and efficiency of discrete channels 2.7. Calculus of the binary discrete channel capacity 2.8. Capacity of "n" order symmetric channel 2.9. Capacity of the binary channels with cancellations III. Source coding for noiseless channels 8 hours 3.1. Code defining 3.2. The coding theorem for existence of instantaneous codes 3.3. Mean length of codeword 3.4. Code capacity, redundancy and efficiency 3.5. The theorem of source coding for noiseless channels 3.6. Shannon - Fano binary algorithm coding 3.7. Huffman binary algorithm coding 3.8. Huffman algorithm for M>2 IV. Source coding for noisy channels 10 hours 4.1. Error correction and detection 4.2. Relationships between detecting or correcting number of errors and Hamming distance 4.3. Defining of parity check and generator matrix for block linear codes 4.4. Coding operation 4.5. Error word 4.6. Defining of received word syndromes for linear block codes 4.7. Decoding of received words 4.8. Relationships between parity check matrix columns for "e" errors detection 4.9. Relationships between parity check matrix columns for "e" errors correction 4.10. Numbers of parity check symbols for "e" random errors correction. Hamming limit. 4.11. Varsamov limit 4.12. Burst of errors 4.13. Relationships between parity check matrix columns for detection or correction of burst of errors 4.14. Numbers of parity check symbols for burst of errors detection or correction Total: 28 hours b) Applications 1-2. Safety regulation. Basic concepts in information theory 4h 3. Linear sequential filters 4h 4. Pseudorandom binary sequences generator 4h

5. Variable entropy generator 4h 6. Analog digital converter 4h 7. Convolutional codes 4h 8. Synchronization codes. Barker sequences generator 4h Total: 28 hours 10. References: [1] Berlekamp, E. R. Algebraic Coding Theory. New-York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1968. [2] Brown, R. G., Hwang, P. Y. C., Intoduction to random signals and applied Kalman filtering, John Wiley

and Sons, Inc., Second Edition, 1992. [3] Papoulis, A., Probability, random variables and stochastic processes, McGraw-Hill Book Company,

1965, 1984, 1991. [4] Garcia, A. L., Probability and random processes for electrical engineering, Addison-Wesley Publishing

Company, 1989. [5] Van Trees, H., Detection, estimation and modulation theory, Part I, II, III, John Wiley & Sons Inc., 1968. [6] Borda M. E. Teoria transmisiunii informatiei, Partea I-a, Teoria informatiei si codarii (fundamente si

aplicatii), Universitatea Tehnica Cluj - Napoca, 1993. [7] Munteanu, V., Teoria transmiterii informatiei, Editura "Gh. Asachi" Iasi, 2001. [8] Munteanu V. Detectie si estimare, Editura "Gh. Asachi" Iasi, 1997. [9] Murgan, A. T., Teoria transmisiunii informatiei - Probleme, Editura Didactica si Pedagogica, Bucureati,

1983. [10] Spataru, Al., Teoria transmisiunii informatiei. Semnale si perturbatii, Editura Tehnica, Bucuresti, 1963. [11] Spataru, Al., Teoria transmisiunii informatiei. Coduri si decizii statistice, Editura Tehnica, Bucuresti,

1971. [12] Spataru, Al., Teoria transmisiunii informatiei, Editura Didactica si Pedagogica, Bucuresti, 1983. [13] Stark, H., Probability, random processes and estimation theory for engineers, John W. Woods, Prentice-

Hall, 1983. [14] Stoica V., Mihaescu A. Teoria transmisiunii informatiei Litografia I. P. Timisoara, 1990. Date: 20.01.2011 Lecturer: Prof. Daniela Tarniceriu, PhD Instructor: As. Prof. Lucian Trifina, PhD

S y l l a b u s Physical training and sport 3

1. Course leader(s): Lect. Drd. Abălaşei Cătălin Petronel 2. Topic characteristics: DC, DM EDIC206 3. Contents:

Number of hours per week

Number of hours per semester Semester

C S PW P

Final assessment

C S PW P TOTAL III 1 V.P 14 14

4. Objectives of the topic: a) Strengthening of health and the harmonious development of the body b) Improvement of basic movement qualities c) Learning and consolidation of some basic procedures and elements in athletics, gymnastics, games, fitness, their appliance in bilateral games or individual activities d) Learning of some basic notions of rules in carrying on a sports competition e) Creations of habituation in respecting sports hygiene norms and learning of schematic physical exercise with daily and weekly schedule 5. Concordance between the objectives of the topic and the objectives of the training plan (curriculum): Physical education and sports come to fulfill the learning plan of this engineering profile, contributing at the more useful scheduling of leisure, in the creation of premises for approaching professional qualities in good health conditions and with increased working strength. It is a mobilizing factor especially for team work. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in knowledge, technical skills and abilities a. Knowledge Theoretical and practical knowledge required to develop activities at the respective course. b. Technical skills and abilities - To identify the structural and functional purpose of physical exercise, basic mean in physical education; - To identify the proper means of developing physical activity; - To know the meaning of specialty documents in organizing the learning process - To individualize the physical effort based on particularities, options and preferences; - To identify actions and to dose the physical means used depending on the team - To adapt the possessed materials to the student groups and working methodology. 7. Teaching procedures: - Repeated actions in different conditions based on pace, strength and complexity of the movements; - Individual practicing of different exercises, their application in team play; - Individualizing of physical effort and work based on options and preferences with owned materials 8. Evaluation system: Stages: Continuous assessment: g) type of imposed assignments: participating in non-representative teams activity in sport types

or in performance sport; h) means of working conditions for reaching the goal: sports hall, the used didactic materials

are from the basic equipment(barbells, fitness devices, materials for games) i) percentage of evaluation in the final mark. Specialty projects (applications) Final evaluation(T): preliminary examination -grading of knowledge accumulated during the percentage 50% scholar year by comparative tasks, tests;

-grading the regular and active participation in percentage 50% practical assignments, representative teams in sport branches or in performance sports. 9. Content of the subject: 9.1. Course 9.2. Applications:

Name of task and content Nr of hrs. 1)Athletics

• running elements • jumping and standing start technique • middle-distance running • jogging

2) Basic, aerobics and artistic gymnastics • front and formation exercises, walking and running variety, simple

ground exercises • game exercises and dynamic simple elements from acrobatic

gymnastics(rollovers, rolling etc.) • combined course paths with equilibrium elements, climbing,

transport • classic, modern and traditional dancing steps on the appropriate

music 3) Sport games: basketball, handball, football, volleyball, badminton.

• Basic positions, pacing and field crossing • Easy hits, serves, first-touch exercises, still and motion grabbing

and passing of the ball • Elementary technique action finishing exercises, marking

exercising • Global participation in games on small and normal fields with

different purposes 4) improvement of basic motion qualities and specific to some sport branches, by using some fitness, athletics and body-building

• Strength and muscular mass improvement by proper use of weights and barbells

• Shape adjusting exercises and turning fat into active tissue • Improvement of speed characteristics(reaction, repeating,

movement, execution) by specific exercises • Increasing mobility and fitness at different levels • Increasing stamina

Total 14 hours 10. Selective bibliography: a) LUMPKIN, Angela Physical education a contemporary introduction St.Louis, MO Times Mirror/Mosby 1986, ISBN 0-8016-2998-5 b) Budescu, Emil I. Fundamentals of biomechanics in sports Iasi Sedcom Libris 2005, ISBN 9736701530 c) Ionescu, A., V., -Exercitiul fizic in slujba sanatatii, Stadion publisher, Buc, 1971. d) Ulmeanu, Constantin, -Notiuni de fiziologie cu aplicatii la exercitiile fizice, UCFS publisher, Buc, 1966. e) Dragnea, A., Bota, Aura, -Teoria activitatii motrice, Editura Didactica si Pedagogica publisher, R.A., Buc., 1999. f) Teodorescu, Leon.- Terminologia educatiei fizice si sportului, Stadion publisher, Buc., 1973. Date: 29.01.2011 Position and name Signatures: Course leader: lect.drd. Abălaşei Cătălin Petronel

S y l l a b u s C o u r s e n a m e F u n d a m e n t a l E l e c t r o n i c

C i r c u i t s 1. Lecturer: Associate Professor Mihail Florea Ph.D. 2. Course type: DT, DM EDID207 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 4 3 - 2 1 E, 6k 42 - 28 14 84

4. Course objectives:

• Introducing of basic knowledge on the operating principles of some important classes of electronic circuits and their characterization;

• The study of the design and analysis techniques and the initiation in some categories of electronic circuits design;.

• The presentation of the theoretical and practical aspects of the performances evaluation of the electronic circuits.

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: On one side, this course requires a series of knowledge introduced in some previous courses like Fundamentals of electrical engineering, Signals circuits and systems or Electronic devices and, on the other side, it contributes to the understanding of subjects from other courses, such as Digital integrated circuits or Analog integrated circuits. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills Cognitive Skills: - The knowledge of some electronic circuits categories such as amplifiers, voltage stabilizers, oscillators and of their functioning peculiarities determined by the frequency range. - The knowledge of some design and analysis techniques of those categories of electronic circuits, including concepts such as feedback; - The knowledge of the parameters that characterize the electronic circuits and of their experimental methods of investigation; General Skills: - The creation of the basic capabilities of critical understanding, explanation, design and testing of some complex electronic systems or parts thereof; Specific Skills: - The creation of specific communication skills in microelectronics and electronics fields; - The creation of skills necessary to use the electronic circuits simulation software environments; - The creation of skills necessary for the electronic circuits analysis and design, as well as for the experimental evaluation of their performances. 7. Teaching methods

• Teaching the course is done by exposing the theoretical concepts accompanied by examples and applications and the projection of demonstration simulation or of materials available to students via the website. It seeks to initially understand the phenomena on an intuitive basis, supplemented by rigorous justification and demonstration of the key issues, highlighting the relevant issues in the engineering practice. During the lecture, an active dialogue with students is stimulated as a mechanism for setting the information submitted in the lecture. Applications are based both on the material taught in class and on the students individual documenting, guided by the teacher, the students having access to certain resources on the website of the discipline. Students receive design tasks that have to be solved as individual projects, receive guidance on the steps to

be followed and use the software environments available in the laboratories of the Department of Electronics Fundamentals to simulate their designed circuits

The level of instruction, both theoretical and applied, is adjusted to the level of preparedness of students resulted from the dialogue during the course and the ongoing activities evaluation, focusing, on the one hand, on bringing a larger number of students above the average level of competencies of the discipline and, on the other hand, on guiding the very good students to deepen their skills.

8. Evaluation procedure: Ongoing assessment: traditional Activity at: project and laboratory (share in final score: 30%) Tests on track: a mid-semester test (written test with two theoretical subjects and a problem - share in final score: 20%) Final assessment: Exam (oral examination with two theoretical issues and two problems; for solving problems, the students may use any material they want – share in final score: 50%) 9. Course content: a) Course I. Introduction …………………………………………………………………………………........... 1 hour II. Review of the Electronic Devices and of the Basic Single Stage Amplifiers ................................. 2 hours III. Electronic Aplifiers ..................................................................................................................... 21 hours (Definitions; the steady state parameters and characteristics; the high frequency operation of the basic amplifier stages; the approximate determination of the amplifiers bandwidth limits using the time constants method; two-stages amplifiers having good behavior at high frequency; multi-stages amplifiers; differential amplifiers; amplifiers with negative feedback; the stability and the frequency compensation of the feedback amplifiers; large signal amplifiers, types and sources of noise in amplifiers) IV. DC Voltage Regulators ………………………………………………………….……………….. 9 hours (parametric voltage stabilizers; the static and dynamic parameters; feedback voltage regulators with series or paralel control element; the analysis of the voltage regulators as feedback amplifiers; the output short- circuit protection of the voltage regulators; voltage regulators examples; switched mode dc-dc converters and voltage regulators) V. Harmonic Oscillators ...................................................................................................................... 9 hours (the parameters of the oscillators; the oscillator types; the linear theory - the general conditions of oscillation (Barkhausen); the cvasilinear oscillators theory – the limiting of the oscillation amplitude; RC oscillators; oscillator with paralel RLC circuit; 3 points LC oscillators). Total: 42 hours b) Applications 18. Project 14 hours (The general theme: designing amplifiers; the students receive different types of schemes and individual design data; Stages: choosing of the supply voltage and the bias circuit design for a given peack-to-peack swing of the output voltage, determining the open loop gain using the small signal equivalent scheme; the negative feedback network design for a given closed loop gain; the performances evaluation by simulation; the project presentation) 19. Laboratory 28 hours (the review of the basic single stage amplifiers; multi stages amplifiers; the low frequency behaviour of the common emitter amplifier; the high frequency behaviour of the cascode (common emitter-common base)amplifier; paralel input – paralel output feedback amplifier; voltage amplifier with negative feedback; mid-term test; the frequency compensation of the feedback amplifiers; differential amplifiers; large signals amplifiers; voltage regulators; RC oscillators; the final assessment practical laboratory test)

Total: 42 hours

10. References: 1. Adel S. Sedra, Kenneth C. Smith, Microelectronic Circuits-Fifth Edition, Oxford University Press, New York Oxford, 2004 2. Paul R. Gray, Paul J. Hurst, Stephen H Lewis, Robert G. Meyer, Analysis and Design of Analog Integrated Circuits-Fifth Edition, John Wiley & Sons Inc., New York, 2009 3. Allan R Humbley, Electronics, PRENTICE HALL, New Jersey , 2000 4. Course web page: http://dce.etti.tuiasi.ro

Signatures:

Date: January 25, 2011 Lecturer (name and surname)

Associate Professor Mihail Florea Ph.D. Instructor (s) (name and surname)

Asistant Professor Gabriel Bonteanu

S y l l a b u s C o u r s e n a m e Signals, Circuits and Systems 2

1. Lecturer Prof. Victor GRIGORAŞ, PhD 2. Course type: DT, DM EDID208 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 4 3 - 2 E 42 - 28 70

4. Course objectives: The course introduces complex methods of circuit design and signal processing regarding modulated signals generation, filtering and demodulation, feedback system stability, state space descryption and electronic filter synthesis. 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The course aims at fundamental technical training of communications undergraduate students. It mainly relies on knowledge aquired at the Signals, Circuits and Systems 1 course and offers the necessary background for future courses, such as ‘Analogue Integrated Circuits’, ‘Computer Aided Design’, ‘Communication systems’, ‘Analogue Circuit Synthesis’ and ‘Radio communications’. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills Durring Signals, Circuits and Systems 2 study, undergraduate students acquire skills in modulated signals analysis and processing, analogue system stability, state space description of analogue systems and filter synthesis. 7. Teaching methods Course presentation: theoretical exposition, examples and applications. Applications: design calculations followed by computer simulations and/or experimental measurements.

8. Evaluation procedure: At each laboratory, a 15’ test is given; the last week a final lab test is performed. The overall semester activity is weghted with 20%. The final examination is a written test, without access to any documentation, weighted 80%. 9. Course content: a) Course:

I. Modulated signals and band-pass systems.18 hours Amplitude modulation with harmonic and impulse carrier; modulation index; specific measurements and demodulation methods; time and frequency multiplexing. Angular (phase – frequency) modulation with harmonic carrier; specific measurements and demodulation methods. Band-pass system response to modulated signals; direct method, cuasistationary hipothesys; base-band equivalent.

II. Analogue linear, time-invariant system stability10 hours Open-loop stability; Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion. General fedback stability principle; Barkhausen oscilation conditions.

Nyquist stability criterion; applications. Root-locus method; applications.

III. Analogue linear, time-invariant state equations. 8 hours Input-state output analog system characterization; state equations; analogue implementation block diagrams. State equations deduction and solving. The relation between state equations and the transfer function. State transition matrix diagonalization; implementation block diagrams.

IV. Introduction to analogue filter synthesis. 6 hours The general design framework. Approximation of analogue transfer functions; Butterworth, tchebishev and eliptic filters Active implementation of analogue filters; cascade and parallel implementations; state-variable implementation of filter biquads.

Total: 42 hours b) ApplicationsSeminary: 20. Amplitude modulation with harmonic carrier.2 hours 21. Amplitude demodulation. 2 hours 22. Amplitude modulation impulse carrier; time vs frequency multiplexing. 2 hours 23. Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion; Barkhausen oscilation conditions. 1 hour 24. Nyquist stability criterion. 2 hours 25. Root-locus method. 2 hours 26. Analogue systems state equations. 1 hour 27. Filter synthesis methods. 2 hours Total: 14 hours Laboratory: 1. Amplitude modulation with harmonic carrier.2 hours 2. Synchronous demodulator. 2 hours 3. Anvelope demodulator. 2 hours 4. Amplitude modulation impulse carrier. 2 hours 5. Angular modulation. 2 hours 6. Swept frequency generators analysis. 2 hours 7. 2nd order band-pass system response to modulated signals. 2 hours 8. RC oscillators stability analysis. 2 hours 9. LC oscillators stability analysis. 2 hours 10. Feedback amplifier state-space stability analysis. 2 hours 11. 2nd order state equations filter design. 2 hours 12. Transfer function approximation. 2 hours 13. State-variable analogue filter design. 2 hours 14. Final laboratory test. 2 hours

Total: 28 hours 10. References: 1. William N. Siebert, Signals, Circuits and Systems, MIT Press, 1988, ISBN 0-262-19229-

2 2. Ciocoiu, I.B., Leuciuc, A., Signals, Circuits and Systems – Laboratory notes (in

Romanian), Editura Stef, Iaşi, 2007, ISBN 978-973-8961-88-3 3. Ghinea, R.E., Maiorescu, A.V., Applied Symbolic Calculus: Lab notes for Signals,

Circuits and Systems, http://scs.etti.tuiasi.ro/scslabs/SimboliceSCS/index.html

4. Gh. Cartianu, s.a., Signals, Circuits and Systems (in Romanian), Editura Didactica şi Pedagogica, Bucureşti 1982.

Signatures: Date: November 29th 2010 Lecturer (name and surname)

Prof. Victor GRIGORAŞ, PhD Instructor (s) (name and surname)

Radu Matei Asist. Paul UNGUREANU, PhD

S y l l a b u s C o u r s e n a m e

D i g i t a l I n t e g r a t e d C i r c u i t s 1. Lecturer : Associate prof. Damian Imbrea, PhD 2. Course type: DT, DM EDID209 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 4 3 - 2 1 E 42 - 28 14 84

4. Course objectives:

Presentation of digital IC families Design of logic circuits

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum:

Very good 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills 7. Teaching methods Paper and pencil explanations Image projections on a screen CAD tools 8. Evaluation procedure: Continuous evaluation (laboratory, project, assignments) and a final test. 9. Course content: a) Course I. Boolean Algebra – 3 hours

I.1 Binary numbers and codes I.2 Postulates and theorems I.3 Logic functions

II. Synthesis and analysis of combinational logic – 6 hours II.1 Logic gates and practical considerations II.2 Canonical forms of logic functions and gate implementations II.3 Minimization procedures II.4 Two level and multi-level circuits II.5 Hazard of combinational logic III. Classes of combinational circuits – 6 hours

III.1 Multiplexers/demultiplexers III.2 Decoders/encoders III.3 Code converters III.4 Comparators III.5 Shifters

III.6 Parity detectors/generators III.7 Adders/subtractors III.8 Arithmetic-logic units

IV. Families of digital integrated circuits – 3 hours IV.1 Transistor level MOS circuits (NMOS, PMOS, CMOS) IV.2 Scaling of MOS circuits

IV.3 BiCMOS circuits V. Latches and Flip-Flops – 6 hours

V.1 Clock signals, synchronous and asynchronous signals V.2 RS and D latches V.3 D and JK flip-flops V.4 Set-up and hold timing constraints

VI. Synthesis and analysis of Finite State Machines – 9 hours VI.1 Mealy and Moore sequential machines VI.2 Design with D flip-flops VI.3 Design with JK flip-flops VI.4 Analysis procedure of sequential machines VII. Counters and Registers – 6 hours VII.1 Modulo 2n counters VII.2 Modulo p ≠ 2n counters VII.3 BCD counters VII.4 Frequency dividers with counters VII.5 Basic operation modes (parallel load, shift and hold) VII.6 Linear and nonlinear feedback shift registers VIII. Memory and programmable logic circuits – 3 hours VIII.1 Advanced CMOS technologies VIII.2 RAM and ROM memories VIII.3 PLA, PAL, CPLD and FPGA Total: 42 hours b) ApplicationsProject: Finite State Machine design P1. Desin specifications – 2 hours P2. Presentation of Mentor Graphics design tools – 2 hours P3. Design some elementary logic cells – 4 hours P4. Gate level implementation of FSM – 2 hours P5. Design simulation – 2 hours P6. Results evaluation – 2 hours

Total: 14 hours Laboratory L1. Presentation of the laboratory equipment and security rules – 2 hours L2. TTL and CMOS logic gates – 2 hours L3. Gate level implementation of combinational logic – 2 hours L4. Multiplexers – 2 hours L5. Decoders – 2 hours L6. Latches – 2 hours L7. D flip-flops – 2 hours L8. JK flip-flops – 2 hours L9. Asynchronous sequential circuits – 2 hours L10. Periodical signal generators with FSM – 2 hours L11. Counters – 4 hours

L12. Registers – 2 hours L13. Final evaluation – 2 hours

Total: 28 hours 10. References: 1. D. A. Hodges and H. G. Jackson, Analysis and Design of Digital Integrated Circuits, McGraw-Hill, 1983 2. Wayne Wolf, Modern VLSI Design: System on Silicon, 2nd edition, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1998 3. M. Morris Mano, Digital Design, 2nd edition, Prentice Hall, LA, 1991 4. R. Jacob Baker, Harry W. Li, David E. Boyce, CMOS: Circuit Design, Layout and Simulation, IEEE Press, New York, 1998 5. D. Imbrea, Circuite Logice Combinaţionale, Ed. Gh. Asachi, Iaşi, 2004 6. *** Design Consideration for Logic Products: Application Book, Texas Instruments, 1998 7. Richard F. Tinder, Engineering Digital Design, 2nd edition, Academic Press, San Diego, 2000 8. ***Mentor Graphics documentation

Signatures:

Date: Lecturer (name and surname): 25.11.2010 Damian Imbrea Instructor (s) (name and surname) Gabriel Bonteanu

S y l l a b u s DATABASES

1. Lecturer : Assoc. Prof. Dr.Eng. Luminiţa SCRIPCARIU 2. Course type: DM EDID210 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 4 2 - - 1 C 28 - - 14 42

4. Course objectives: 1. Knowledge of the fundamentals and terminology of databases 2. Study of the specific elements of a relational database 3. Knowledge of SQL 4. Practical competencies building in database design, implementation and testing 5. Applicative competencies in SQL programming 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The objectives of this discipline are included in the „Electronics and Telecommunications Engineering” profile curriculum. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills The course represents an introduction to telecommunications techniques and systems. The discipline is intended to build the following skills:

• Knowing the fundamentals and terminology of databases • Knowing the data modeling techniques • Knowing the databases programming language SQL • Practical skills in relational databases design • Applicative skills in databases programming language SQL

7. Teaching methods

• Oral presentation based on PowerPoint slide shows • Exemplify • Case studies • DB Design • Experimental works in the laboratory • SQL Programming

8. Evaluation procedure: Final evaluation (20 %): Theory quiz

Laboratory: 20 % Project: 60 % 9. Course content:

a) Course Chapter I. Fundamentals and terminology of databases ...……….……….……... 2 hours I.1 Definitions and aplicativity I.2 Categories of personal I.3 The elements of a database I.4 Conceptual Data Modeling I.5 Physical Modeling I.6 Database Architectures Chapter II. Specific elements of a database ………………………………………. 4 hours II.1 Entities II.2 Atributs II.3 Relationships II.4 Entity-Relation Diagram (ERD) II.5 Cardinality II.6 View II.7 CODD’s Rules II.8 Transactions Chapter III. Entity-Relation Diagram …………………………………..…..……. 4 hours

III.1 Choosing the set of entities and atributes III.2 Entity-Relation Model III.3 Graphical Representation of the ERD III.4 Connection Traps III.5 Interpreting ERD III.6 Relationships Matrix III.7 Normalization

Chapter IV. Data Modeling ………………………….…………………..……..…. 6 hours IV.1 Redundant Relationships

IV.2 Solving Many-to-many Relationships IV.3 Hierarchic Relationships. Recursive Relationships IV.4 Relationships Transferability IV.5 Types and Subtypes IV.6 Historical Modeling. Time Modeling IV.7 Generic Modeling IV.8 Physical Modeling

Chapter V. Finalizing the Database Design Process ...……………......…….……... 2 hours V.1 ”CRUD” Analysis V.2 Sequence. Index. Role V.3 Tranzaction Control V.4 Life Cycle of a Database Application Chapter VI. Structured Query Language …………………..……..….…..….…... 10 hours VI.1 Data Types VI.2 SQL Functions (case functions, group functions, arithmetic functions etc.) VI.1 Definition Language Commands (CREATE, DROP, ALTER, RENAME) VI.2 Data Manipulation Commands (INSERT, SELECT, TRUNCATE, UPDATE, DELETE etc.) VI.3 JOIN Types VI.4 Control the Users Rights (ROLE, GRANT, REVOKE)

Total: 28 hours b) Laboratory

1. Creating Tables .............................................................................................................2 hours 2. How to define a query? ……..………………...…………………………………….... 2 hours 3. Forms and Reports ...………………………………… …..…….……..…………...… 2 hours 4. SQL Definition Commands .......................................................................................... 2 hours 5. SQL Data Manipulation Commands ............................................................................. 2 hours 6. Queries in SQL ……………………...………………………………………………… 2 hours 7. SQL Commands for user’s rights .................................................................................. 2 hours

Total: 14 hours

c) Project

1. Choosing entities and atributes for a database ............................................................. 2 hours 2. ERD.............................................................................................................................. 2 hours 3. Normalizing ERD ...........................................………………………………………... 2 hours 4. DB Implementation using SQL ..................................................................................... 4 hours 5. Populate the DB ........................................................................................................... 2 hours 6. DB Testing ………………...…………………………………………………………... 2 hours

Total: 14 hours

10. References: [1] Hugh Darwen, An Introduction to Relational Databases Theory, www.bookboon.com (free textbook), 2010, Hugh Darwen & Ventus Publishing ApS, ISBN 978-87-7681-500-4 [2] Akeel I Din, Structured Query Language (SQL) A Practical Introduction, NCC Blackwell, 1994, http://www.managedtime.com/freesqlbook.php[3] Thomas Connolly and Carolyn Begg, Database Systems, 4th Edition, 2005, Pearson Education, ISBN 0-273-70413-3. [4] Ramez Elmasri and Shamkant B. Navathe, Fundamentals of Database Systems, 5th Edition, 2007, Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-321-36957-2. [5] C. J. Date, An Introduction to Database Systems, 8th Edition, 2003, Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-321-19784-4.

Signatures:

Date: Jan. 21st, 2011 Lecturer: Luminiţa SCRIPCARIU Instructor: Petre Daniel Mătăsaru

S y l l a b u s

D i g i t a l s i g n a l p r o c e s s i n g

1. Lecturer: Prof. Daniela Tarniceriu, PhD 2. Course type: DM EDID211 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total

4 3 2 Written Exam 42 28 70

4. Course objectives: The objective of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and understanding of the central elements of digital signal processing theory (including sampling theory, FIR and IIR filter theory, and spectral analysis) and the ability to apply this theory to real-world signal processing applications. Specific objectives are:

- Understand how digital to analog (D/A) and analog to digital (A/D) converters operate on a signal and be able to model these operations mathematically;

- Analyze discrete signals and systems in time, Z and frequency domain; - Design and implement simple finite impulse response (FIR) filters; - Design and implement simple infinite impulse response (IIR) filters; - Define and use Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT).

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The discipline objectives are in agreement with the curricula aiming at transmitting information and creating competence for future professionals in the field of Electronics, Telecommunications and Information Technology. The discipline is integrated in the curricula for Applied Electronics and Telecommunications Systems and Technologies and uses in specific manner knowledge and methods that were introduced in the disciplines of Mathematics, Signals, circuits and systems, Information Theory and is properly placed in the chronology of the curricula. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills Through lectures, homework, and laboratory experiments, students should acquire the following skills: 1. Cognitive

a. Knowledge and understanding: - deep knowledge of theoretical, methodological and practical developments used in digital

signal processing techniques (discrete signals and systems, analysis and synthesis of discrete linear time invariant systems, implementation structures).

b. Explanation and interpretation - Ability to apply knowledge of math, science and engineering. - Ability to design and conduct experiments, analyze and interpret data. - Ability to design a systems to meet desired needs within realistic constraints.

2. Technical / professional: − Analyze discrete signals and systems in time, Z and frequency domain. − Design digital filters through pole-placement techniques. − Design digital IIR filters by designing prototypical analogue filters and then applying analog

to digital conversion techniques such as the bilinear transformation. − Design digital FIR filters using the window method. − Implement digital filters in a variety of forms: direct form I and II, parallel, and cascade.

− Analyze signals using the discrete Fourier transform (DFT). − Understand circular convolution, its relationship to linear convolution, and how linear

convolution can be achieved via the discrete Fourier transform. 3. Attitude – value

- Implication in scientific/development activities connected with design and construction of digital systems;

- Capacity of having an ethical behavior; - To be able to critically understand, to explain and interpret theoretical, methodological and

practical developments that are specific to digital communications systems and techniques; - To have communication abilities specific to the discipline object; - To work in an international context.

7. Teaching methods Course: - procedural resources: In teaching the course one combines the oral exposé with video projector use and explanations, case studies, etc. In order to evidence the theoretical notions and specific applications, one creates connections with the content of other specialty disciplines and previously introduced information within this discipline or with practical applications of the investigated problems. The course content is periodically updated.

- methods – oral exposé, conversation, use of visual means, demonstration, synthesis of knowledge, case studies;

- academic procedures – academic course, explanation, exposé - training procedures and organization - frontal, groups

- material resources: - PC, video projector, whiteboard

Applications: - procedural resources:

- methods – conversation, discussion, practical works, use of visual means, demonstration, synthesis of knowledge, case studies;

- academic procedures – explanation, academic exposé, learning by discovery, observation

training procedures and organization – group, individual 8. Evaluation procedure: The assessment is realized continuously, through practical laboratory and home works. The results are checked and analyzed. The weight of applications in the final grade is 20%. During the semester there are 4 homeworks, whose weight is 20% in the final grade. The final assessment is made by classical written exam, lasting two hours, with two problems and two issues of theory, with equal weight in the final grade of the thesis. The weight of the thesis in the final grade is 60%. Students have access to relations that are necessary to solve the problems. 9. Course content: a) Course I. DISCRETE SIGNALS SETS 2 hours 1.1. Principles of digital signal processing 1.2. Analog and discrete signals 1.3. Signal acquisition, processing and distribution II. ORTHOGONAL DISCRETE TRANSFORMS 8 hours 2.1. The Z transform 2.1.1. Properties 2.1.2. Basic Z transforms 2.2. The discrete Fourier transform 2.2.1. Definition 2.2.2. Properties 2.2.3. Basic Fourier transforms 2.3. The discrete Fourier series

2.3.1. Definition 2.3.2. The relationship between the Fourier series and the Fourier transform 2.3.3. Properties III. DISCRETE-TIME LINEAR INVARIANT SYSTEMS 10 hours 3.1. Discrete time systems classifying 3.2. FIR and IIR filters 3.3. Transient and permanent response 3.4. The input-output characterization for discrete time systems 3.4.1. Response computation in the time domain 3.4.2. Response computation using the Z transform 3.4.3. Permanent response computation using the discrete Fourier transform 3.4.4. Periodic signal response using the Fourier series 3.4.5. The relationship between pole position, time and frequency response 3.4.6. Equivalent forms of characterization for discrete time systems IV. FINITE IMPULSE RESPONSE FILTERS 10 hours 4.1. Introduction to digital filter design 4.1.1. Types of digital filters 4.1.2. Choosing between FIR and IIR filters 4.1.3. Filter design steps 4.1.3.1. Specification of the filter requirements 4.1.3.2. Coefficient calculation 4.1.3.3. Structures for filter realization 4.1.3.4. Filter implementation 4.2. Characteristic features of FIR filters 4.3. Linear phase response 4.4. Using of z transform in linear phase FIR filters design 4.5. FIR coefficient calculation methods 4.5.1. Window method 4.5.1.1. Advantages and disadvantages of the window method 4.5.2. Frequency sampling method 4.5.2.1. Nonrecursive frequency sampling filters 4.5.3. The optimal method 4.6. Realization structures for FIR filters 4.6.1. Direct form structure 4.6.2. Cascade form structure 4.6.3. Frequency sampling structure V. INFINITE IMPULSE RESPONSE FILTERS 12 hours 5.1. Introduction 5.1.1. Commonly used analogue filters 5.1.2. Design stages for digital IIR filters 5.2. Performance specification 5.3. Calculation of IIR filter coefficients 5.3.1. Pole zero placement method 5.3.1.1. Lowpass, highpass and bandpass filters 5.3.2. Impulse invariant method 5.3.3. Bilinear transform method 5.3.4. Designing of highpass, bandpass and bandstop filters by frequency transformation 5.4. Structures for IIR filters 5.4.1. Direct form I structure based on state variables and direct form II structure based on transfer

function 5.4.2. Signal flow graphs and transposed structures 5.4.3. Cascade form structures 5.4.4. Parallel form structures 5.4.5. Comparison between structures Total: 42 hours b) Applications1. Introduction to Matlab 2h 2. Discrete signals 2h 3. Discrete, linear, time invariant systems 2h 4. Convolution 2h

5. Algorithms for convolution computation 2h 6. Sampling 2h 7. Discrete Fourier Transform 4h 8. Synthesis of FIR filters 4h 9. Synthesis of IIR filters 2 10.Direct design techniques for digital IIR filters 2h 11. Filter implementation 2h

Total: ..28. hours 10. References:

1. V. Oppenheim, R. W. Shafer, Discrete - Time Signal Processing, Englewood Cliffs, NJ. Prentice Hall, 1989.

2. Proakis, J. G., Manolakis, D. G., Introduction to Digital Signal Processing, New York Macmillian, 1992.

3. Jackson, L. B., Digital Filters and Signal Processing, Kluwer Academic Publisher, Hingham, 1989. 4. Mitra, S. K., Digital signal Processing, McGraw Hill, 2002. 5. Ciochină, S., Prelucrarea numerică a semnalelor- partea I, U. P. B., 1995. 6. Grigoraş, V., Tărniceriu, D., Prelucrarea numerică a semnalelor, Ed. Gh. Asachi Iaşi, 1995. 7. Munteanu, V., Teoria Transmisiunii Informaţiei, Ed. Gh. Asachi Iaşi, 2002. 8. Naforniţă, I., Câmpeanu, A., Isar, A., Semnale, circuite şi sisteme, Universitatea Politehnica

Timişoara, 1995. 9. D. Tărniceriu, Filtrare digitală, Ed. Tehnopres, Iasi 2004, ISBN 973 – 702 – 044 – 8, 2004, 331 pagini. 10. D. Tarniceriu, Bazele prelucrarii numerice a semnalelor, Ed. Politechnium, Iaşi, 2008, 372

pagini, ISBN 978-973-621-196-6. Date: 20.01.2011 Lecturer: Prof. Daniela Tarniceriu, PhD Instructor: As. Prof. Lucian Trifina, PhD

S y l l a b u s THEORY OF PROBABILITY 1. Lecturer: Assoc. Prof. PhD. Liliana Popa 2. Course type: DE EDOF212A 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 3 2 2 Exam 28 28 56

4. Course objectives:

• To give an introduction of the mathematical study of randomness and uncertainly • To apply them to statistics and computer engineering. • To carry out analysis to computer engineering

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: Previous courses like Algebra and Calculus (Mathematical analysis) are mandatory and are recommended for the course of Theory of Probability. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills

• To perform a wide variety of probability calculations • To have a well found knowledge of standard distributions which can describe real

life phenomena • To carry out statistical analysis of data.

7. Teaching methods The teaching methods are traditional; the students have to solve some problems during the seminary. Some classical models from technic and phisical reality are chosen. The problems are chosen in correlation with the general level of the group of students.

8. Evaluation procedure:

- The activity during the seminary is traditional and consists in problems solving. The students have also to prepare a homework which consists in a statistical analysis of data. The weigh in the final evaluation is : 20%

- A written paper in the middle of the semester, with the weigh 50 % in

in the final evaluation, is given. - The final examination is an oral examination with the weigh of 30_% in the final

evaluation. The Exam has two stages: a) – The first stage is to present the homework which consists in a statistical analysis of data. The students have to prove the understanding of statistical tools in research of the random fenomena. b) – The second stage is to answer to some questions from the most important theoretical subjects of the course and to carry them in some real situations. The both stages have the same grade in the examination.

9. Course content: a) Course I. Probability Space Conditional Probabilities and Independent Events; Total Probability and Bayes’Rule; Sampling with and without Replacement; the Binomial Probability Law; the Multinomial Probability Law; the Geometric Probability Law. …4 hours II Random Variables :The Notion of Random Variable; Some Important Discrete Random Variables: Binomial, Geometric, Poisson; Continuous Random Variables; the Cumulative Distribution Function; the Probability Density Function; Some Important Continuous Distributions: Uniform, Normal, Gamma, Rayleigh, Exponential, Weibull, Student, Chi-square. Basic Reliability Calculations: the Failure Rate Function; Reliability of Systems. 6 hours III. Multiple Random Variables: Pairs of Random Variables; the Joint Cumulative Distribution Function; the Joint Probability Density Function ;Functions of Several Random Variables; Transformations of Random Vectors; Sums of Random Variables Relations between Continuous Random Variables; Characteristic Function 4...hours IV Characteristic Values of Random Variables:Mean and Variance of a Random Variable; Chebyshev Inequality; The Correlation and Covariance of Two Random Variables; Mean Square Estimation;;The Law of Large Numbers The Central Limit Theorem. 4 hours V. Statistics. Data analysis. Mean. Variance. Confidence intervals for mean and variance. Hypothesis testing. Chi-square test.Linear regression 6 hours VI. Random Processes: Definition of a Random Process;The Mean, Autocorrelation and Autocovariance Functions; Gaussian Random Processes; Poisson Process; Stationary Random Processes; Markov Chains. 4 hours Total: 28 hours b) Applications I. Probability Space 4 hours II Random Variables 6 hours III. Multiple Random Variables 4...hours IV Characteristic Values of Random Variables: 4 hours V. Statistics. 6 hours VI. Random Processes: 4 hours

Total: 28 hours 10. References:

1.Alberto Leon-Garcia,1989: Probability and Random Processes for Electrical Engineering, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 2.Henry Stark, John W. Woods, 1986: Probability, Random Processes, and Estimation Theory for Engineers, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 3.E. Wentzel, L. Ovcharov, 1986: Applied Problems in Probability Theory, Mir Publishers, 4.A.Pletea, L.Popa, 2001:Teoria probabilităţilor,Universitatea Tehnică "Gh.Asachi",Iaşi 5. P.Talpalaru, L.Popa, E.Popovici, 1995, Probleme de teoria probabilităţilor şi statistică matematică, Universitatea Tehnică "Gh.Asachi", Iaşi

Signatures:

Date: 21.01. 2011 Lecturer Liliana Popa Instructor Rosu Daniela

S y l l a b u s

Statistics

1. Lecturer: Assoc. Prof. PhD. Liliana Popa 2. Course type: DE EDOF212B 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 3 2 2 Exam 28 28 56

4. Course objectives:

• To give an introduction of the mathematical study of randomness and uncertainly • To apply them to statistics and computer engineering. • To carry out analysis to computer engineering

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: Previous courses like Algebra, Calculus (Mathematical analysis) and Theory of Probability are mandatory. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills

• To have a well found knowledge of standard distributions which can describe real life phenomena

• To carry out statistical analysis of data. 7. Teaching methods The teaching methods are traditional; the students have to solve some problems during the seminary. Some classical models from technic and phisical reality are chosen. The problems are chosen in correlation with the general level of the group of students.

8. Evaluation procedure:

- The activity during the seminary is traditional and consists in problems solving. The students have also to prepare a homework which consists in a statistical analysis of data. The weigh in the final evaluation is : 20%

- A written paper in the middle of the semester, with the weigh 50 % in

in the final evaluation, is given. - The final examination is an oral examination with the weigh of 30_% in the final

evaluation. The Exam has two stages: a) – The first stage is to present the homework which consists in a statistical analysis of data. The students have to prove the understanding of statistical tools in research of the random fenomena. b) – The second stage is to answer to some questions from the most important theoretical subjects of the course and to carry them in some real situations. The both stages have the same grade in the examination.

9. Course content: a) Course I. Basic Concepts from Theory of Probability Conditional Probabilities and Independent Events; Total Probability and Bayes’Rule; Sampling with and without Replacement; the Binomial Probability Law; the Multinomial Probability Law; the Geometric Probability Law. …4 hours II Random Variables :The Notion of Random Variable; Some Important Discrete Random Variables: Binomial, Geometric, Poisson; Continuous Random Variables; the Cumulative Distribution Function; the Probability Density Function; Some Important Continuous Distributions: Uniform, Normal, Gamma, Rayleigh, Exponential, Weibull, Student, Chi-square. Basic Reliability Calculations: the Failure Rate Function; Reliability of Systems. 6 hours III Sampling Distributions: Finite population. Data analysis. Mean. Variance.Sampling Distributions associated with Normal Distribution . Normal Approximation of the Binomial Distribution 4...hours IV Point Estimation: The Method of Moments; The Method of Maximum Likelihood; Properties of a Point Estimator 2 hours V Interval Estimation. Confidence intervals for mean and variance. Confinence Interval Concerning Two Population Paramater 2 hours VI Hypothesis Testing. Neyman-Pearson Lemma. Likelihood Ratio Test.Chi-square test. Hypothesis for a Single Parameter…………………………… 6 hours VII. Linear Regression Models: The Method of Least Squares. Correlation Analysis. Regression Diagnostics. 4 hours Total: 28 hours b) Applications I. Basic Concepts from Theory of Probability …4 hours II Random Variables : 6 hours III Sampling Distributions: 4 hours IV Point Estimation: 2 hours V Interval Estimation. 2 hours VI Hypothesis Testing. 6 hours VII. Linear Regression Models 4 hours

Total: 28 hours

10. References: 1.Alberto Leon-Garcia,1989: Probability and Random Processes for Electrical Engineering, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 2.Henry Stark, John W. Woods, 1986: Probability, Random Processes, and Estimation Theory for Engineers, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 3.E. Wentzel, L. Ovcharov, 1986: Applied Problems in Probability Theory, Mir Publishers, 4.A.Pletea, L.Popa, 2001:Teoria probabilităţilor,Universitatea Tehnică "Gh.Asachi",Iaşi 5. P.Talpalaru, L.Popa, E.Popovici, 1995, Probleme de teoria probabilităţilor şi statistică matematică, Universitatea Tehnică "Gh.Asachi", Iaşi

Signatures:

Date: 21.01. 2011 Lecturer Liliana Popa Instructor Rosu Daniela

S y l l a b u s

T r a i n i n g 1. Lecturer : 2. Course type: IA EDID213 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 4 - - Com-

pressed - E - - 120 - 120

4. Course objectives: - Developing a systemic approach in circuit analysis and signal processing areas; - Stressing the similarity between the signal characterizing analog and discrete circuits; - Device-level and functional block-level circuit analisys; - Practialities in using dedicated simulation packages; 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The objectives of this discipline are included in the „Electronics and Telecommunications Engineering” profile curriculum. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills Cognitive, technical or professional skills

o Cognitive skills: familiarization with different simulation environments. o Technical and profesional skills : instalation and configuration for simple applications,

configuration and operating issues. o Transversal skills: knowledge of the operating methodologies and basic aspects of the signal

processing interdisciplinarity 7. Teaching methods

• Oral presentation based on PowerPoint slide shows 8. Evaluation procedure: Continuous evaluation: 20%

Final evaluation 80 % 9. Course content: b) Laboratory

1. Labour protection regulation .......................................................................................... 4 h 2. Theoretical Breviary.......................................................................................................14 h 3. Presentation of the simulation programs .......................................................................16 h 4. Case studies ................................................................... .............................................. 76 h 5. Weekly tests...... ............................................................................................................. 6 h 6. Final test ........................................................................................................................ 4 h Total: 120 h Signatures

Teach. assist. Felix Diaconu 30.01.2011

S y l l a b u s

R o m a n i a n L a n g u a g e 3

1. Lecturer: Assoc. Prof. Constanta Avadanei, PhD 2. Course type: DF EDLC213 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total

3 2 Oral examination 28 28

4. Course objectives:

The main objectives of the course consist in mastering both the active and the passive skills with emphasis on encoding, decoding and transmitting messages in fluent Romanian.

The achieve the above mentioned objectives we are going to stress on: - teaching the adequate vocabulary for intermediate level; - teaching elements of grammar (morpho-syntax); - developing the skills needed, later on, in using technical and scientific Romanian; - developing writing skills needed to produce different types of coherent texts; - developing communication skills (fluency and accuracy) on common topics; - developing translation skills.

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The objectives presented meet the requirements of the curriculum and of its main goal – that of training future specialicts in the field of electronics and telecommunications, enabling them to participate in social and professional interactions. This correlation is achieved through training and guidance on multiple levels: topics, vocabulary, grammar, tasks and methodology. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills - recognizing the meaning of words from context; - reading for specific information; - recognizing the text structure; - expressing ideas; - organizing information in a coherent text. 7. Teaching methods In teaching and consolidation, we use such various and efficient methods and strategies as: a. classical (reading, translation, questions and answers, grammar exercises, etc.); b. modern (pair and group work, role play, etc.). Function of the level of study, we make use of teaching-learning strategies such as discussions and debates with stress on speaking skills. 8. Evaluation procedure: Final evaluation: Oral evalution ( C ) – 50% Continuous assessement – 50%

9. Course content: The content of the Romanian course complies wih the curriculum for 2nd year, intermediate level students. At this stage, students will study general and technical Romanian, each unit focusing on one major skill and at least one other integrated skill. There are authentic reading and listening texts with a variety of tasks which aim at improving the students’ ability to comprehend spoken and written Romanian to write and speak in the target language. Each Unit will be taught in 2 hours. Syllabus 1st Semester

1. De la Papirusul Rhind la calculatorul electronic. 2. In tovarasia numerelor admirate de Pitagora. 3. Primul pas catre creierul electronic. 4. Oglinda lui Arhimede. 5. Automatele au peste 2000 de ani. 6. Robotica. 7. Semiconductori. 8. Telecomunicatiile prin cablu optic. 9. Atomul. 10. Energie neconventionala (I) 11. Energie neconventionala (II). 12. Televiziunea. 13. Antene. 14. Consolidare.

10. References: Constanta Avadanei, N. Apetroaie, Culegere de texte tehnice pentru studentii straini,

Institutul Politehnic “Gh. Asachi”, Iasi, 1978 Constanta Avadanei, Limba Romana pentru studentii cetateni straini. Facultatea de

Electrotehnica, Institutul Politehnic “Gh. Asachi”, Iasi, 1982 Date: 20.01.2011 Lecturer: Assoc. Prof. Constanta Avadanei, PhD

S y l l a b u s

R o m a n i a n a s a f o r e i g n l a n g u a g e

1. Lecturer: Assoc. Prof. Constanta Avadanei, PhD 2. Course type: DF EDLC218 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total

4 2 Oral examination 28 28

4. Course objectives:

The main objectives of the course consist in mastering both the active and the passive skills with emphasis on encoding, decoding and transmitting messages in fluent Romanian.

The achieve the above mentioned objectives we are going to stress on: - teaching the adequate vocabulary for intermediate level; - teaching elements of grammar (morpho-syntax); - developing the skills needed, later on, in using technical and scientific Romanian; - developing writing skills needed to produce different types of coherent texts; - developing communication skills (fluency and accuracy) on common topics; - developing translation skills.

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The objectives presented meet the requirements of the curriculum and of its main goal – that of training future specialists in the field of electronics and telecommunications, enabling them to participate in social and professional interactions. This correlation is achieved through training and guidance on multiple levels: topics, vocabulary, grammar, tasks and methodology. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills - recognizing the meaning of words from context; - reading for specific information; - recognizing the text structure; - expressing ideas; - organizing information in a coherent text. 7. Teaching methods In teaching and consolidation, we use such various and efficient methods and strategies as: a. classical (reading, translation, questions and answers, grammar exercises, etc.); b. modern (pair and group work, role play, etc.). Function of the level of study, we make use of teaching-learning strategies such as discussions and debates with stress on speaking skills. 8. Evaluation procedure: Final evaluation: Oral evalution ( C ) – 50% Continuous assessement – 50%

9. Course content: The content of the Romanian course complies with the curriculum for 2nd year, intermediate level students. At this stage, students will study general and technical Romanian, each unit focusing on one major skill and at least one other integrated skill. There are authentic reading and listening texts with a variety of tasks which aim at improving the students’ ability to comprehend spoken and written Romanian to write and speak in the target language. Each Unit will be taught in 2 hours. Syllabus 2nd Semester

1. Calculatoarele digitale. 2. Sa facem un program. 3. Calculatoare electronice de conceptie romaneasca. 4. Informatica si tehnica de calcul. 5. Microprocesoarele, memorii integrate. 6. Primul circuit integrat romanesc. 7. Automatizarea flexibila si robotii industriali. 8. Robotii domestici. 9. Cinci generatii de telefoane. 10. Video-informatii la solicitare telefonica. 11. Inceputurile magnetofonului. 12. Optimizarea retelelor telefonice. 13. Laserele. 14. Televiziunea.

10. References: Constanta Avadanei, N. Apetroaie, Culegere de texte tehnice pentru studentii straini,

Institutul Politehnic “Gh. Asachi”, Iasi, 1978 Constanta Avadanei, Limba Romana pentru studentii cetateni straini. Facultatea de

Electrotehnica, Institutul Politehnic “Gh. Asachi”, Iasi, 1982 Constanta Avadanei, Constructii idiomatice in limbile romana si engleza, Editura

Universitatii “ Al.I. Cuza” Iasi , 2000 Date: 20.01.2011 Lecturer: Assoc. Prof. Constanta Avadanei, PhD

S y l l a b u s

C o u r s e n a m e A n a l o g I n t e g r a t e d C i r c u i t 1. Lecturer: Associate Professor Neculai Cojan Ph.D. 2. Course type: DM EDID301 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 5 3 - 2 1 E, 6k 42 - 28 14 84

4. Course objectives:

• The course introduces concepts and applications based on fundamental amplifiers types and theirs applications;

• The study of the circuit implementations, performances , analysis and design for each fundamental amplifier type;

• The study of the theoretical and practical aspects of applications with basic amplifier types in analog systems;

• The course present highlights correlations between amplifier type, practical device limitations and applications performances;

• The course present design-oriented analog applications based design specifications and insist for their functional understanding.

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: On one side, this course requires a series of knowledge introduced in some previous courses like Physics, Electronic Devices, Fundamental Electronic Circuits and Signal, Circuits and Systems and, on the other side, it contributes to the understanding of subjects from other courses, such as Computer-aided analysis of electronic circuits, Digital integrated circuits, VLSI Analog integrated circuits and VLSI Digital integrated Circuits. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills Cognitive Skills: - The knowledge of the circuit configurations and the understanding of the operation of the fundamental analog integrated circuits types in different analog applications; - The knowledge of the design and analysis techniques of some basic analog integrated stages, their models and applications; - The knowledge of the parameters that characterize the basic analog integrated stages and the correlation between them and the circuits performances; -The knowledge of the practical limitations of the basic analog integrated circuits. General Skills: - The creation of the basic capabilities of critical understanding, explanation, design and testing of some complex analog systems or parts thereof; Specific Skills: - The creation of specific communication skills in microelectronics and electronics fields; - The creation of skills necessary to use the analog integrated circuits simulation software environments; - The creation of the electronic circuits analysis and design skills regarding the sizing and the stress assessing of the analog integrated circuits. 7. Teaching methods Teaching the course is done by exposing the theoretical concepts accompanied by examples and applications and the projection of demonstration simulation or of materials available to students via the website. It seeks to initially understand the phenomena on an intuitive basis, supplemented by rigorous justification and demonstration of the key issues, highlighting the relevant issues in the engineering practice. During the lecture, an active dialogue with students is stimulated as a mechanism for setting the information submitted in the lecture. Applications are based both on the material taught in class and on the students indiviual documenting, guided

by the teacher, the students having access to certain resources on the website of the discipline. The level of instruction, both theoretical and applied, is adjusted to the level of preparedness of students resulted from the dialogue during the course and the ongoing activities evaluation, focusing, on the one hand, on bringing a larger number of students above the average level of competencies of the discipline and, on the other hand, on guiding the very good students to deepen their skills.

8. Evaluation procedure: Ongoing assessment: traditional Activity at: project and laboratory (share in final score: 20%) Tests on track: a mid-semester test (written test with two theoretical subjects and three problems - share in final score: 40%; this is 50% of exam score at option of the student) Final assessment: Exam (written test with three theoretical issues and five problems – share in final score: 80%) 9. Course content: a) Course I. Elementary stage with ideal transistors ; accurate and aproximative estimation............................ 1 hour II Elementary stages with real transistors; accurate and aproximative estimations………………….2 hours III Fundamental amplifiers types; circuits and performances; statics and dynamics limitations (Operational amplifier, Operational transconductance amplifie, Norton amplifier, Current amplifier, Current Conveior)…….....................................................................................................................................3 hours IV Elementary applications with fundamentals amplifiers (Inverting Amplifier, Noninverting amplifier, Adder, Differential amplifier, Instrumentations amplifier Integrators, Differentiators.)………………………………………………………………………….8 hours V Converters ( V to I converters, I to V converters, F to V converters, V to F converters, D/A converters and A/D converters)……………………………………………………………………………………………6 hours. VI Signal generators (Sine wave generators, Triangular wave generators, Multivibrators, Monolitic timers)…………..7 hours VII Voltage references and regulators (Voltage references and applications, Voltage regulators, Switch regulators, LDO regulators, Monolitic regulators)…………………………………………………………………………………………...3 hours VIII Nonlinear applications (Comparators, Schmitt trigger, Precision rectifiers, Peak detectors, Sample and hold circuits, Log/antilog circuits, Multipliers)……………………………………………………………………………….…9 hours IX Phase Locked Loops (Circuits, performances and applications)……………………………………………………….….3 hours Total: 42 hours b) Applications • Project 14 hours -Inverting and noninverting amplifier based OA………………………………………………………3hours -Dual slope analog to digital converter……………………………………………………………….. 3 hours -R-2R analog to digital converter………………………………………………………………………1 hours -Sine wave generator with amplitude control loop …………………………………………………….6 hours -Monoolitic multivibrator with 555……………………………………………………………………..1 hours • Laboratory 28 hours -Static performance and limitations for AO (741)…………………………………………………..2 hours -Dynamic performance and limitations for AO (741)………………………………………...……. 4 hours -Norton amplifier (3900) ……………………………………………………………………..……..2 hours -Fundamenatal amplifiers with AO………………………………………………………….………4 hours -Integrators-Differentiators……………………………………………………………….…………2 hours -Comparators with AO and applications……………………………………………………….……2 hours

-Precise rectifier with AO……………………………………………………………………………2 hours -Reference and voltage regulators……………………………………………………………………2 hours -Signal generators…………………………………………………………………………………....2 hours -V to I converters…………………………………………………………………………………….2 hours -Monolitic generators…………………………………………………………………………………2 hours -Peak detectors an sample and hold circuits………………………………………………………….2 hours

Total: 42 hours 10. References: 1. S. Franco, Design with operational amplifiers and analog integrated circuits, Mc Graw-Hill, Higher Educations, 2002. 2. Paul R. Gray, Paul J. Hurst, Stephen H Lewis, Robert G. Meyer, Analysis and Design of Analog Integrated Circuits-Fifth Edition, John Wiley & Sons Inc., New York, 2009 3. David Stout, Milton Kaufman, Handbook of operational amplifier circuit design, Mc Graw-Hill Book Company, 1976. 4. A Manolescu, A. Manolescu, L Turic s.a., Circuite Integrate Liniare, Editura didactica si Pedagogica, 1983 5. Course and applications on web page: http://vlsi.etti.tuiasi.ro

Signatures:

Date: January 25, 2011 Lecturer (name and surname)

Associate Professor Neculai Cojan Ph.D. Instructor (s) (name and surname)

Asistant Professor Gabriel Bonteanu

S y l l a b u s D e c i s i o n a n d E s t i m a t i o n i n D a t a P r o c e s s i n g

1. Lecturer: Prof. Daniela Tarniceriu, PhD 2. Course type: DM EDID302 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 5 2 1 1 Exam 28 14 14 56

4. Course objectives: The objective of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and understanding of the central elements of cyclic error correcting codes, decision and estimation theory. Specific objectives are:

− To develop fundamentals of group codes; − To present cyclic codes, including coding and decoding based on multiplication and division

circuits; − To present statistical properties of random signals; − To present the topics of signal detection; − To apply decision criteria both for discrete and continuous observation.

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The discipline objectives are in agreement with the curricula aiming at transmitting information and creating competence for future professionals in the field of Electronics, Telecommunications and Information Technology. The discipline is integrated in the curricula for Telecommunications Systems and Technologies and uses in specific manner knowledge and methods that were introduced in the discipline of Coding Theory and is properly placed in the chronology of the curricula. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills Through lectures, homework, and laboratory experiments, students should have the following competencies: Cognitive Skills: Knowledge of theoretical and practical aspects specific to nosy channel coding, statistical characterization of random processes and the principles and decision criteria used in signal detection, for both continuous and discrete observation. General Skills:

− Be able to understand, explain and interpret theoretical and practical aspects specific to noisy channel coding and decision methods in signal detection.

− Have specific communication skills; Specific Skills:

− To know specific mathematical methods for statistical characterization of random processes; − To obtain systematic and nonsystematic cyclic codes by means of control and generator

matrices; − To know and use the encoding and decoding schemes for one error and two adjacent errors

cyclic correcting code; − To characterize random processes using statistical and time average values; − To know and apply decision criteria for signal detection between two or more alternatives.

7. Teaching methods The teaching methods combine lectures with explanations, discussions, case studies, in order to highlight theoretical concepts and specific applications. It allows connections with other disciplines, with information previously submitted and practical applications. 8. Evaluation procedure:

The assessment is realized continuously, through practical laboratory and home works. The results are checked and analyzed. The weight of applications in the final grade is 25%. The final assessment is made by classical written exam, lasting two hours, with two problems and two issues of theory, with equal weight in the final grade of the thesis. The weight of the thesis in the final grade is 75%. Students have access to specific relationships to solve problems. 9. Course content: a) Course I. Group codes 4 hours 1.1. Parity check and generator matrix 1.2. The syndrome and error word 1.3. Decoding tables 1.4. One error correcting Hamming group code 1.5. Decoding of Hamming group code 1.6. One error correcting, two errors detecting group Hamming code II. Cyclic codes 8 hours 2.1. Defining of the code word for systematic and nonsystematic cyclic codes 2.2. Circuits for polynomial multiplication and division 2.3. Coding and decoding based on multiplication and division circuits 2.4. Coding and decoding based on feedback registers 2.5. Single error correcting cyclic coder with feedback registers 2.6. Single error correcting cyclic decoder with feedback registers 2.7. Defining of parity check and generator matrix for cyclic codes 2.8. Threshold decoding 2.9. Two adjacent errors decoding 2.10. The syndrome for two adjacent errors III. Random signals 8 hours 3.1. Defining of random signal, random variable, probability density function and cumulative distribution function 3.2. The expected value of random variables 3.3. Stationary random processes 3.4. Finding of the threshold voltage for noisy channel receiving 3.5. Wiener Hincin theorem 3.6. Main properties of autocorrelation 3.7. Finding the autocorrelation of the received noisy signals 3.8. Finding the autocorrelation and power spectral density of a random binary sequence 3.9. Finding the autocorrelation and power spectral density of a random telegraphic signal 3.10. Finding the autocorrelation of a pseudorandom periodic sequence 3.11. Finding the weighing function of a linear time invariant system using the correlation method. 3.12. Finding the autocorrelation and power spectral density at the output of a linear time invariant system IV. Signal detection 8 hours 4.1 Transmission system model for signal detection 4.2 Detection between two alternatives in discrete time observation 4.3 Minimum risk criterion (Bayes' rule) 4.4. The ideal observer criterion 4.5. Maximum likelihood criterion 4.6. Neyman - Pearson criterion 4.7. Minimax criterion 4.8. Sufficient statistic 4.9. Detection of two known signals in discrete time observation 4.10. Finding the probabilities of the correct and false decisions in discrete time observation 4.11. Inferring of the sufficient statistic in continuous time observation 4.12 Finding likelihood ratio for continuous time observation 4.13. Receiver implementing for continuous time observation 4.14. Finding the probabilities of the correct and false decisions in continuous time observation 4.15. Sequential detection. Wald test 4.16. Sequential detection of a known signal 4.17. Signal detection between several alternatives Total: 28 hours b) Applications

1-2. One error correcting, two errors detecting Hamming coder decoder 4h 3-4. One error correcting cyclic coder decoder 4h 5. Finding cumulative distribution function 2h 6. Transmission system with binary decision 4h Total: 14 hours 10. References: [1] Anderson, B. D. O., Moore, J., Optimal filtering, Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N.J. 07632, 1979. [2] Berlekamp, E. R. Algebraic Coding Theory. New-York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1968. [3] Brown, R. G., Hwang, P. Y. C., Intoduction to random signals and applied Kalman filtering, John Wiley

and Sons, Inc., Second Edition, 1992. [4] Garcia, A. L., Probability and random processes for electrical engineering, Addison-Wesley Publishing

Company, 1989. [5] Mendel, J. M. Lessons in digital estimation theory, Prentice-Hall, Inc. 1992. [6] Papoulis, A., Probability, random variables and stochastic processes, McGraw-Hill Book Company,

1965, 1984, 1991. [7] Stark, H., Probability, random processes and estimation theory for engineers, John W. Woods, Prentice-

Hall, 1983. [8] Van Trees, H., Detection, estimation and modulation theory, Part I, II, III, John Wiley & Sons Inc., 1968. [9] Borda M. E. Teoria transmisiunii informatiei, Partea I-a, Teoria informatiei si codarii (fundamente si

aplicatii), Universitatea Tehnica Cluj - Napoca, 1993. [10] Munteanu, V., Teoria transmiterii informatiei, Editura "Gh. Asachi" Iasi, 2001. [11] Munteanu V. Detectie si estimare, Editura "Gh. Asachi" Iasi, 1997. [12] Murgan, A. T., Teoria transmisiunii informatiei - Probleme, Editura Didactica si Pedagogica, Bucureati,

1983. [13] Spataru, Al., Teoria transmisiunii informatiei. Coduri si decizii statistice, Editura Tehnica, Bucuresti,

1971. [14] Spataru, Al., Teoria transmisiunii informatiei, Editura Didactica si Pedagogica, Bucuresti, 1983. [15] Stoica V., Mihaescu A. Teoria transmisiunii informatiei Litografia I. P. Timisoara, 1990. Date: 25.11.2010 Lecturer: Prof. Daniela Tarniceriu, PhD Instructor: As. Prof. Lucian Trifina, PhD

S y l l a b u s FUNDAMENTALS OF RADIOCOMMUNICATIONS

1. Lecturer: professor assistant eng. Radu Gabriel Bozomitu 2. Course type: DM EDIS303 3. Course structure:

Semester No. hours/week No. hours/semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 5 2 2 Exam 28 28 56

4. Course objectives: - The course is intended to offer knowledge on radio-communications systems analysis and design; - To provide students knowledge on the structure of radio-communications systems; - To provide students knowledge to develop and design radio-communications systems; - To provide students the necessary skills to use a computer simulation program for designing electronic circuits used in radio-communications systems implementation. 5. Consistency between discipline and curriculum goals:

Course objectives are consistent with the objectives of the curriculum for the training of specialists in telecommunications domain. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical and professional skills Cognitive skills:

Proficiency in theoretical developments, methodological and practical designing of the modern radio communications systems (oscillation sources in radio-communications, signals and modulations in radio-communications, radio-receiving principles, emission and receiving antennas, amplitude modulation, phase and frequency modulation, single side band signals). General skills:

- To be able to critically understand, explain and interpret the theoretical, methodological and practical developments to designing of the modern radio-communications systems;

- To be able to use computer simulation programs used in the design of RF electronic circuits (at the system and schematic levels);

- To be able to select and apply appropriate behavioral models for system-level simulations;

- To have communication skills in the field of radio-communications; - To work in an international context.

Specific skills: - To understand the theoretical principles underlying radio-communications systems; - To be able to design radio-communications systems; - To be able to create a behavioral model suitable for a radio communication system

for system-level simulations; - To understand and use different techniques for RF circuit simulation (transient

analysis, small signal analysis, large signal analysis, total harmonic distortion calculation, etc.).

7. Teaching methods: Teaching: Oral presentation using the video-projector and case discussions. Laboratories: Completion of the computer laboratory papers and carrying out the practical laboratory subjects. Discussions based on the laboratory papers. Tracking and guidance to perform the laboratory work. Scoring on the results.

The examination requirements: knowing the course and applications subjects, oral and written examination of the students. 8. Evaluation procedure

Continuous evaluation: Activity in the seminar / laboratory / project / practice

Share of final grade: 10 %

Tests during the semester Share of final grade: 10 %

Specialty papers:

Share of final grade: 10 %

Final evaluation: Exam Share of final grade: 70 %

Evaluations: 1. Written evaluation – problems 50 %;

2. Oral evaluation, verification of theoretical knowledge 50 %; 9. Course content: I. INTRODUCTION I.1. Radio-communication system. Modulation I.2. Source, load, adaptation Chapter 1. OSCILLATION SOURCES IN RADIO-COMMUNICATIONS 1.1. Introduction. Local exciters and oscillators 1.2. Oscillation sources signals perturbations

1.2.1. Frequency stability 1.2.2. Oscillation sources signals’ spectrum 1.2.3. Oscillation sources signals perturbations

a. Phase noise b. Perturbations’ level (non-essential radiations, spurious outputs)

1.3. Harmonic oscillators with transistors 1.3.1. Generalities. Auto-oscillation condition 1.3.2. Three point transistorized oscillators

a. Oscillations magnitude auto-limitation. Low and high auto-excitation b. Oscillation frequency

1.3.3. Oscillation frequency stability 1.4. Quartz controlled oscillators

1.4.1. Quartz as a piezoelectric resonator 1.4.2. Equivalent schematic of the quartz resonator 1.4.3. Piezoceramic resonators. Surface elastic (acoustic) wave resonators (SAWR)

Magnetostatic wave devices 1.4.3.1. Piezoceramic resonators elastic 1.4.3.2. Surface elastic (acoustic) wave resonators (SAWR) 1.4.3.3. Magnetostatic wave devices

1.4.4. Quartz resonator equivalent impedance. Resonance frequencies 1.4.5. Oscillation frequency changing for quartz oscillators 1.4.6. Quartz oscillators schematics

1.4.6.1. Realization principles for quartz oscillators. Oscillation frequency a. Three point quartz oscillators b. Feedback quartz oscillators c. Considerations on quartz oscillators calculation 1.5. Frequency synthesizers

1.5.1. Generalities. Characteristics and classification of synthesizers 1.5.2. Indirect frequency synthesis, with phase locked loop

1.5.2.1. Introduction. PLL operating principles 1.5.2.2. Indirect frequency synthesis principles

a. PLL frequency translation loop principle b. PLL frequency multiplication principle.

1.5.2.3. Digital blocks PLL frequency synthesis a. One loop synthesizers b. Phase locked two loop synthesizers Chapter 2. SIGNALS AND MODULATIONS IN RADIO-COMMUNICATIONS 2.1. Signals

2.1.1. Introduction 2.1.2. Telecommunication useful signals

2.1.2.1. Introduction 2.1.2.2. Audio signal 2.1.2.3. TV signal 2.1.2.4. Data signal 2.1.2.5. Relative (dB, Np) and absolute (dBW, dBm, dBu) levels.

Section 1.01 2.2. Amplitude modulation 2.2.1. AM signals. Specters 2.2.2. Energetic relations in AM 2.2.3. AM signal obtaining principles

Section 1.02 2.3. Frequency and phase modulation 2.3.1. Frequency and phase modulation signals’ expression

2.3.1.1. Frequency modulation (FM) signals 2.3.1.2. Phase modulation (PM) signals 2.3.1.3. FM signal may be obtained by phase modulation of RF carrier with useful signal’s integral.

2.3.2. FM and PM signals specters 2.3.2.1. Narrowed band UM signals 2.3.2.2. Wide band UM signals 2.3.2.3. Comparison between FM and PM signals specters

2.3.3. FM signal passing through nonlinear circuits. Frequency shifting multiplication 2.3.4. FM signals obtaining principles

2.3.4.1. FM signals generation with varicap diode oscillators 2.3.4.2. Quartz controlled oscillators FM signals generation with varicap diode in the resonant

circuit 2.4. Single Sideband (SSB) radio-emitters

2.4.1. Generalities. General characteristics of AM-SSB transmission 2.4.2. AM-SSB signals

2.4.2.1. AM-SSB signals spectrum and envelope a. AM-SSB signal spectrum b. AM-SSB signal envelope c. Energetic relations for the AM-SSB signal

2.4.2.2. Frequency stability problem in AM-SSB communications 2.4.3. Advantages of AM-SSB transmission

2.4.4. AM-SSB signals synthesis (generation) 2.4.4.1. AM-SSB signals synthesis by filtering method

Chapter 3. RADIO-RECEIVING PRINCIPLES 3.1. Introduction 3.2. Radio-receivers main characteristics 3.3. Radio-receivers main types

3.3.1. Direct amplification receivers 3.3.2. Reaction and super-reaction receivers

Chapter 4. EMISSION AND RECEIVING ANTENNAS 4.1. Elementary data about antennas

4.1.1. Operating principles of emission antennas 4.1.2. Radiation diagram of emission antennas 4.1.3. Antennas gain 4.1.4. Asymmetric dipole type emission antennas. Earth influence 4.1.5. Reflective antennas 4.1.6. Slot antennas, wave-guide and horn antennas 4.1.7. Receiving antennas

Chapter 5. AMPLITUDE MODULATION 5.1. General aspects 5.2. Basics of amplitude modulation 5.3. Amplitude modulated signal’s amplification 5.4. Amplitude modulation in transistorized RFPA

5.4.1. Generalities 5.4.2. Collector amplitude modulation. Combined collector – base modulation

5.5. Increase of am emitters’ efficiency Chapter 6. PHASE AND FREQUENCY MODULATION 6.1. General aspects 6.2. Frequency modulated signals’ generation

6.2.1. Generalities. Principles of FM signals’ obtaining 6.2.2. FM integral-differential equation 6.2.3. FM quasistatic equation. Modeling 6.2.4. FM signals generation with varicap diodes oscillators 6.2.5. FM signals generation with tube or reactance transistor 6.2.6. FM signals generation using Miller’s effect 6.2.7. FM signals generation using commended triangular and rectangular signal generators 6.2.8. FM signals generation by Armstrong’s method 6.2.9. Center frequency stability assurance for FM emitters

6.3. Phase modulation signal generation 6.3.1. PM signals generation by a resonant unmatching LC circuit 6.3.2. PM signals generation using shift phase AM signal 6.3.3. PM signals generation by Cartianu proceeding

Chapter 7. SINGLE SIDE BAND SIGNALS 7.1. Generalities 7.2. AM-SSB signals formation

7.2.1. AM-SSB signals formation by filtering method 7.2.2. AM-SSB signals formation by shift phase method (phase compensation) 7.2.3. AM-SSB signals formation by Weaver method (diphase and filtration)

7.3. Balanced modulators 7.3.1. Generalities. Balanced modulator functions 7.3.2. Differential stage as balanced modulator 7.3.3. Gilbert cell analog multiplier as a double balanced modulator 7.3.4. Diodes balanced modulators

7.4. AM-SSB signals amplification 7.4.1. Specific problems of AM-SSB signals amplifiers 7.4.2. Energetic efficiency and PRFA distortions for AM-SSB signals 7.4.3. PRFA stages configuration for SSB signals

Total courses ......................... 28 hours b) Applications:

Laboratory + Project 1. Resonant circuits 2. Coupling oscillation circuits 3. Narrow band matching cells 4. Amplitude modulated signals generation 5. Frequency and phase modulated signals generation 6. Superheterodyne reception

Total applications ..................... 28 hours

10. Selective references: [1] D. F. Bartlett and T. R. Core, „Measuring Maxwell’s Displacement Current Inside a Capacitor”,

Physical Review Letters, Vol. 55, No. 1, July, 1985; [2] D. F. Bartlett and Glenn Gengel, „Measurement of quasistatic Maxwell’s displacement current”,

Physical Review A, vol. 39, No. 3, February 1, 1989; [3] Sophocles J. Orfanidis, „Electromagnetic Waves and Antennas”, Rutgers University, 2008; [4] Robert E. Collin, „Antennas and Radiowave Propagation”, McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1985; [5] Constantine A. Balanis, „Antenna theory: Analysis and design”, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1997; [6] T. Lee, „The Design of CMOS Radio-Frequency Integrated Circuits”, Cambridge, Cambridge

University Press, 1998; [7] Grebennikov, A., Sokal, N. O., „Switch mode RF Power Amplifiers”, Elsevier Inc., 2007; [8] Kazimierczuk, M. K., „RF Power Amplifiers”, J. Wiley & Sons, 2008; [9] Steve C. Cripps, „Advanced Techniques in RF Power Amplifier Design”, Artech House, Inc., 2002;

[10] J. Sewick, „Transmission Line Transformers”, American Radio Relay League, 1990; [11] David Johns, Ken Martin, „Analog Integrated Circuit Design”, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1997; [12] Kenneth R. Laker, Willy M. C. Sansen, „Design of Analog Integrated Circuits and Systems”, McGraw-

Hill, New York, 1994; [13] C. Toumazou, F. J. Lidgey, and D. G. Haigh (eds.), „Analogue IC Design: The Current-Mode

Approach”, London: Peter Peregrinus Ltd., 1990; [14] Behzad Razavi, „Design of Analog CMOS Integrated Circuits”, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, Inc.,

2001; [15] Kevin McClaning, Tom Vito, „Radio Receiver Design”, Noble Publishing Corporation, 2000; [16] A. B. Carlson, „Communication Systems”, McGraw-Hill, 1986; [17] Jack R. Smith, „Modern Communication Circuits”, McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 1998; [18] K. K. Clarke, D. T. Hess, „Communication Circuits: Analysis and Design”, Addison-Wesley Publishing

Company, Reading Massachusetts, 1971; [19] Alan Bensky, „Short-range Wireless Communication. Fundamentals of RF System Design and

Application”, Elsevier’s Science & Technology, Inc., 2004; [20] Věnceslav F. Kroupa, „Direct Digital Frequency Synthesizers”, IEEE Press, Piscataway, NJ 08855-

1331 U.S.A., 1999; [21] Simon Haykin, „Digital Communications”, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1988; [22] Vlad Cehan, „Bazele radioemiţătoarelor” – Editura MatrixRom, Bucureşti, 1997; [23] Vlad Cehan, „Radiocomunicaţii digitale. Vol. I, Radiocomunicaţii”, Editura Stef, Iaşi, 2006; [24] Paul R. Gray, Robert G. Meyer, „Circuite Integrate Analogice - Analiză şi Proiectare”, Editura Tehnică,

Bucureşti, 1999; [25] Gheorghe Maxim, „Radiorecepţie”, Vol. I, Editura Institutului Politehnic Iaşi, 1985; [26] Vlad Cehan, Radu Gabriel Bozomitu, „Bazele Radioemisiei - Îndrumar de laborator”, Editura Stef, Iaşi,

2002;

[27] Radu Gabriel Bozomitu, „Tehnici de liniarizare pentru circuitele integrate de radiofrecvenţă”, Editura Fundaţiei Academice AXIS, Iaşi, 2009;

[28] TDA 5210, Specification and Application Note, http://www.infineon.com/cms/en/product/index.html 22.01.2011

Professor assistant eng. Radu Gabriel Bozomitu, PhD

S y l l a b u s COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN OF ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS

1. Lecturer: Assoc. prof. Dănuţ BURDIA, PhD 2. Course type: DM, DF EDID304 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 5 - - 2 - C 0 0 28 0 28

4. Course objectives:

This course is intended to offer basic knowledge of computer-aided analysis and design of electronic circuits by using appropriate device models, computationally efficient algorithms and simulation tools. Topics to be covered include: principle of device modeling, formulation of circuit equations, sparse matrix algorithms for the solution of large systems, algorithms for dc and transient analysis. The lab includes practical issues of the analog circuit analysis using a general purpose simulation tool (SPICE).

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The course is placed in the fifth semester after the students completed other courses regarding the basic electronic circuits and devices or signal, circuits and systems. The course provides the underlying knowledge about simulation algorithms and computer-aided analysis methods to efficiently simulate electronic circuits and devices, including circuits and devices used in the communication systems. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills

Upon completion of this course the student will be able to: - Demonstrate familiarity with the simulation models of the main electronic devices - Determine the topological matrices of an electrical network. - Analyze linear circuits using Modified Nodal Analysis (MNA) method and Tableau formulation method. - Analyze non-linear resistive circuits using Newton-Raphson methods. - Understand the numerical-integration algorithms used for transient analysis. - Identify the convergence problem of the simulation algorithms. - Edit the circuit file (netlist and statements) according SPICE syntax. - Perform dc, ac or transient analysis using the Orcad PSpice simulator - Using the Orcad PSpice tool kit capabilities for circuit simulation and waveforms representation. 7. Teaching methods

Course : Interactive whiteboard and slides presentation Laboratory : Computer simulations, readings, assignments,

8. Evaluation procedure:

Laboratoty work : 15 %. Tests : 25% Circuit analysis using PSpice simulation tool.

Exam : : 60 % Solving three problems and a theoretical subject 9. Course content:

a) Course 1. Introduction ...................................................................................................................................2h

1.1. Simulation techniques: principles and advantages 1.2. Examples of simulation based analysis types. 1.3. General structure of a simulation software

2. Computer circuit models of electronic devices and components ..................................................4h 2.1. Basic set of the elements used in circuit modeling 2.2. Hierarchy and types of circuit models 2.3. Foundation of model making 2.4. Circuit model for junction diodes 2.5. Circuit model for bipolar transistors

3. Electrical networks topology: the key to computer formulation of the Kirchhoff laws................4h 3.1. Basic concepts in electrical network topology 3.2. Topological matrices: incidence, loop, cutset 3.3. Fundamental relationships among branch variables 3.4. Computer generation of the topological matrices A, B, and D

4. Nodal linear network analysis .......................................................................................................8h 4.1. Computer formulation of nodal equations for linear networks: nodal analysis, modified nodal analysis, tableau method 4.2. Algorithms for solving of linear algebraic equation systems: Gaussian elimination, LU factorization 4.3. Rounding errors. Precision and options for linear network analysis with SPICE 4.4. Sparse matrix techniques for circuit analysis: effect of ordering of equations, determination of fills in LU factorization, a near-optimum ordering algorithm, data structures for sparse matrices

5. Nodal non-linear resistive network analysis .................................................................................4h 5.1. Topological formulation of nodal equations 5.2. Fixed-point iteration concept 5.3. Newton-Raphson algorithm 5.4. Solving the nodal equations by the Newton-Raphson algorithm and its associated discrete equivalent circuit 5.5. The convergence of the Newton-Raphson algorithm. Modified Newton-Raphson techniques. Convergence options in SPICE

6. Hybrid linear resistive n-port formulation algorithms ..................................................................4h 6.1. Formulation of a linear resistive m-port 6.2. Linear resistive n-port without sources 6.3. Linear resistive m-port with independent sources 6.4. Linear resistive m-port with controlled sources

7. Hybrid nonlinear network analysis ...............................................................................................3h 7.1. Formulation of hybrid equations for resistive nonlinear networks 7.2 Piecewise-linear version of the Newton-Raphson algorithm 7.3. Piecewise-linear Katzenelson algorithm

8. Computer formulation of state equations for dynamic linear networks ........................................3h 8.1. State variables, order of complexity and initial conditions 8.2. Computer formulation of state equations for linear active networks 8.3. Computer formulation of the output equations

9. Numerical solution of state equations for dynamic nonlinear networks .......................................5h 9.1. Existence and uniqueness of solutions 9.2. Error considerations in the numerical solution of initial-value problems 9.3. Numerical solution by Taylor series expansion 9.4. Runge-Kutta algorithm 9.5. Numerical solution by polynomial approximation

10.Multistep numerical-integration algorithms.................................................................................3h 10.1. Exactness constraints for multistep algorithms

10.2. Adams-Bashforth algorithm 10.3. Adams-Moulton algorithm

11. Steady state solution of dynamic nonlinear networks .................................................................2h 11.1. Harmonic Balance algorithm 11.2. Periodic steady state algorithm

Total: 42 hours b) Applications 1. Circuit simulation history 2. Overview of SPICE simulation tool: programm structure, files, topological conditions, common conventions and expressions used in a circuit description 3. SPICE description and modeling of passive devices 4. SPICE description of independent sources. 5. SPICE description of controlled sources. 6. DC analysis 7. AC analysis 8. Transient analysis 9. Harmonic distorsion analysis 10. Parametric analysis. Performance analysis. Subcircuits 11. SPICE description and modeling of junction diodes and bipolar transistors. 12. SPICE description and modeling of TEC-J si TEC-MOS devices. 13. Statistical analysis 14. Evaluation test

Total: 28 hours 10. References: 1. Chua L.O. and P.M. Lin, Computer Aided Analysis of Electronic Circuits, Prentice Hall, 1975.

2. Vlach, J. and K. Singhal, Computer Methods for Circuit Analysis and Design, New York, van Nostrand Reinhold, 1983

3. Ioinovici, A. – Computer-Aided Analysis of Active Circuits, Ed. Marcel Dekker, NY, 1990.

4. D. Burdia, Analiza asistata de calculator a circuitelor electronice, Ed. Tehnopres, Iaşi, 2009.

5. D. Burdia, G.S. Popescu Proiectarea asistata de calculator a circuitelor electronice. SPICE si VHDL, Partea I: SPICE, Matrixrom, 1999.

6. Ruehli A.E., Circuit Analysis, Simulation and Design, Advances in CAD for VLSI, vol. 3, North-Holland, 1987

7. Jenkins D.G. and R.C. Welland, Software Engineering for Electronic Systems, IEE Computing Series 18, 1990.

8. Tuinenga, Paul W, SPICE – A Guide to Circuit Simulation & Analysis Using Pspice, Prentice Hall, 1992

9. Vladimirescu, A. – SPICE, Ed. Tehnică, Bucuresti, 1999.

10. *** The Design Center, Circuit Analysis Reference Manual, MicroSim Corp., 1994

11. *** The Design Center, Circuit Analysis User’s Guide, MicroSim Corp., 1994

12. www.pspice.com - manuale de utilizare, download Pspice 9.1 Student Version, etc.

Signatures: Date: 20.01.2011 Lecturer: Assoc. prof. Dănuţ BURDIA, PhD Instructor: Felix DIACONU

S y l l a b u s

FUNDAMENTALS OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS

1. Lecturer : Assoc. Prof. Dr.Eng. Luminiţa SCRIPCARIU 2. Course type: DM EDIS305 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 5 2 1 1 - C 28 14 14 - 56

4. Course objectives:

• Knowledge of fundamentals and terminology of telecommunications • Study of the data coding techniques • Competencies building for data coding algorithms implementation • Knowledge of the analogue and digital modulation techniques • Knowledge of the types, characteristics and perturbations of the

communication channel • Study of the radio communication link • Practical competencies building in radio link design • Applicative competencies in communication techniques simulation

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The objectives of this discipline are included in the „Electronics and Telecommunications Engineering” profile curriculum. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills The course represents an introduction to telecommunications techniques and systems. The discipline is intended to build the following skills:

• Knowing the fundamentals and terminology of telecommunications • Knowing the data coding techniques • Knowing the modulation techniques • Knowing the communication channel types and characteristics • Knowing the receiving techniques (synchronization, equalizing) • Practical skills in using specific telecommunication software. • Applicative skills in telecommunication techniques and algorithms simulation • Skills in communication link design

7. Teaching methods

• Oral presentation based on PowerPoint slide shows • Solving numerical examples • Case studies • Experimental works in the laboratory • Computer Aided Design

8. Evaluation procedure: Final evaluation (60 %): 1. Theory quiz 2. Solving two problems

Laboratory 20 % Assignments 20 % 9. Course content: a) Course Chapter I. Telecommunication Systems Principles. Signal Sources ...……………... 2 hours (principles, schema, vocal signal, transducers, text coding, image signals, digital information sources modelling, analogue-to-digital conversion techniques) Chapter II. Data Coding Techniques ……………………………………………….... 8 hours (compression, encryption, error-correction, translation, line coding) Chapter III. Principles and Analysis of the Modulation Techniques ……….…….. 6 hours (AM, FM, PM, ASK, PSK, FSK, QAM, DSSS, FHSS) Chapter IV. Communication Channel …………………………………………………. 4 hours (transmission lines, wiring, radio-channel, antenna, optical channel) Chapter V. Specific Perturbations on Communication Channels ….……...….…….. 4 hours (white noise, noise temperature, noise factor, equivalent noise bandwidth, fading, radio link design) Chapter VI. Synchronization Principles on Telecommunications ………….….…….. 2 hours (PLL, Costas Loop, Quadratic Loop, DLL, carrier synchronization, bit synchronization, symbol synchronization) Chapter VII. Equalizers ..…………….………...………...……………………...……….. 2 hours (time and frequency equalizing principles, Nyquist first criterium, Zero-Forcing Algorithm, Gradient Algorithm) Total: 28 hours b) Laboratory

8. Probabilistic Analysis of Discrete Information Sources. Lossless Compression Algorithms ……….……………………………………………………………………………. 2 hours

9. Encryption Algorithms ………………………………………………………………... 2 hours 10. Galois Fields. Testing the Error-Correction Algorithms …..…….……..…………...… 2

hours 11. Line Codes ………………...…………………………………………………………... 2

hours 12. Intersymbol Interference ................................ ………………………………………... 2

hours 6. Modulation Techniques ................................................................................................ 2 hours 7. PLL ....................................................................................................................... 2 hours

Total: 14 hours

c) Seminar

1. Probabilistic Analysis of Discrete Information Sources. Lossless Compression Algorithms .2h 2. Encryption and Decryption Techniques ………………..……………………………... 2 hours

3. Galois Fields. Error-Correction Codes …..…….…………...………………..……...… 2 hours 4. Line Codes ………………...…………………………………………………………... 2 hours 5. Noise temperature, noise factor, equivalent noise bandwidth, ………………... ........... 2 hours 6. Antennas. Radio link design ......................................................................................... 2 hours 7. Digital Modulation. Equalizers...................................................................................... 2 hours

Total: 14 hours

10. References:

1. Alexandru N.D., Introducere în telecomunicaţii, Iaşi: CERMI, 2004; 2. Luminiţa Scripcariu, Sisteme de comunicatii digitale, Ed. "Gh. Asachi" Iaşi, ISBN 973-

99210-3-5, 1999. 3. Luminita Scripcariu, Radu Gabriel Bozomitu, Introducere în comunicaţii – îndrumar de

laborator, Editura Karro Iaşi, ISBN 973-87727-1-0, 2006. 4. Luminiţa Scripcariu, Sisteme de comunicaţii digitale – îndrumar de laborator, Editura Karro

Iaşi, ISBN 973-87727-0-2, 2005 5. Roger L. Freeman, Fundamentals of Telecommunications, Second Edition, John Wiley &

Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey, 2005 (copyright Roger L. Freeman) 6. Blahut R.E., Digital Transmission of Information, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company,

1990; 7. Ziemer R.E., Tranter W.H., PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNICATIONS - Systems, Modulation

and Noise, Houghton Mifflin Company USA, 1995;

Signatures: Date: Jan. 21st, 2011 Lecturer: Luminiţa SCRIPCARIU Instructor: Radu Gabriel BOZOMITU

S y l l a b u s Microwaves

1. Lecturer: Nicolae LUCANU, PhD 2. Course type: DT, DM EDID306 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 6 2 0 2 - E 28 0 28 - 56

4. Course objectives: - to explain physical effects of microwave field propagation - to promote familiarity with individual microwave circuit components - to provide a means of building microwave circuits - to realise projects by integrating various systems from microwave, antenna, and communication technology 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum:

Microwave engineering as a subject brings together knowledge from several other subjects that are studied in undergraduate programmes in e.g. electrical engineering. The relationships between currents and voltages from electrical circuit theory are combined with the electromagnetic fields studied in electromagnetics and optics, through the dependencies between flowing charges and propagating fields. Every engineer who works with electronics at frequencies of about 1GHz or higher needs to know at least the basics of microwave engineering. In modern electronics and electrical engineering an alternative to the term "microwave engineering" is therefore in practice "high-frequency electronics". 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills After the course the participants should be able to: - Apply electromagnetc theory to calculations regarding waveguides and transmission lines - Describe, analyse and design simple microwave circuits and devices e g matching circuits, couplers, antennas and amplifiers - Describe and coarsely design common systems: radar and microwave transmission links - Describe common devices such as microwave high-speed transistors and ferrite devices - Handle microwave equipment and be able to make measurements. 7. Teaching methods

Course : Interactive whiteboard and slides presentation Laboratory : Applications

8. Evaluation procedure:

Laboratoty work : 10 %. Assignements : 40%

Exam : 50 % 9. Course content: a) Course

1. Introduction to microwaves................................................................................................................................... 2 h 2. Electromagnetic fields ............................................................................................................................................ 2 h 3. Waves on transmission lines ................................................................................................................................. 2 h 4. Field analysis of transmission lines ....................................................................................................................... 2 h 5. Impedance transformation and matching............................................................................................................... 2 h 6. S-parameters.......................................................................................................................................................... 2 h 7. Passive devices ..................................................................................................................................................... 4 h 8. Resonators ............................................................................................................................................................. 2 h 9. Microwave antennas.............................................................................................................................................. 2 h 10. Active devices ..................................................................................................................................................... 4 h 11. Circuit design, applications ................................................................................................................................. 2 h 12. Measurements techniques.................................................................................................................................... 2 h Total: 28 hours b) Applications 14. Introduction. Lab equipment and safety issues presentation (2h) 15. Microwave circuits particularities (2h) 16. Waveguide propagation (2h) 17. SWR measurement (2h) 18. Impedance measurement (2h) 19. Problems and solving examples (2h) 20. Test. (2h) 21. Smith Chart (2h) 22. S parameters measurement (2h) 23. Microwave office (6h) 24. Problems and solving examples. Last year exam applications (2h) 25. Final Test (2h)

Total:28 hours 10. References: 7. 1. David M. Pozar, 2005, Microwave Engineering - 3rd edition, John Wiley and

Sons. 2. Robert E. Collin, 2001, Foundations for Microwave Engineerig – Second Edition,

IEEE Press. 8. 3. Bal S. Virdee, Avtar S. Virdee and Ben Y. Banyamin, 2004, Broadband

Microwave Amplifiers, Artech House. 9. 4. Inder Bahl, 2003, Lumped Elements for RF and Microwave Circuits, Artech

House Date: 26.01.2011 Lecturer Nicolae LUCANU, PhD

S y l l a b u s ANTENNAS AND PROPAGATION

1. Lecturer : Prof. Ion Bogdan, PhD 2. Course type: DM EDIS307 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester C S L P

Final examination C S L P

Total

6 2 2 E 28 0 28 0 56

4. Objectives: Maxwell equations Wire antennas Aperture antennas Antenna arrays Wave propagation 5. Teaching techniques: Exposition, sketches on whiteboard, videoprojection, on line acces for pdf text, interactive exercizes, homework, computer simulations, miniprojects, discussions. 6. Exam requirements: Proving the understanding of theoretical and practical aspects of antennas and wave propapagtion by solving appropriate problems.

7. Content:

1. FUNDAMENTALS OF FIELD THEORY 2 hours 1.1. Short history 1.2. Types of antennas 1.3. Maxwell equations 1.4. Energy and power 1.5. Wave equation 1.6. Boundary conditions 1.7. Electrical vector potential 1.8. General reciprocity principle 1.9. Duality principle 1.10. Image principle

2. SIMPLE SOURCE RADIATION 9 hours

2.1. Electrical dipole radiation 2.2. Basic parameters of antennas

2.2.1. Radiation pattern 2.2.2. Directivity 2.2.3. Equivalent spatial angle 2.2.4. Directivity estimation formulae 2.2.5. Gain 2.2.6. Polarisation 2.2.7. Input impedance 2.2.8. Antenna cross area

2.3. Radiation of an arbitrary current distribution 2.4. Radiation of wire antennas

2.4.1. Travelling wave thin wire antenna 2.4.2. Types of wire antennas

3. APERTURE ANTENNAS 5 hours

3.1. Rectangular aperture in perfect conductor infinite plane 3.2. Field equivalence principle

3.2.1. Application to rectangular aperture 3.3. Typical field distributions 3.4. Focused apertures 3.5. Horn antennas

4. ANTENNA FOR RECEPTION 5 hours 4.1. Reciprocity 4.2. Equivalent circuit for an arbitrary antenna system 4.3. Directional properties 4.4. Antenna cross area 4.5. Missmatching influence 4.6. Reception of completely polarized waves 4.7. Noise in antennas

5. ANTENNA ARRAYS 9 hours 5.1. Factorisation 5.2. Linear uniform arrays 5.3. Directional properties of a linear array

5.3.1. Main lobe beamwidth 5.3.2. Side lobe maximum level 5.3.3. Maximum directivity 5.3.4. Hansen-Woodyard condition

5.4. Tapered linear arrays 5.4.1. Polynomial method 5.4.2. Z transform method

5.5. Circular arrays 5.6. Array of arrays 5.7. Array optimization

5.7.1. Tschebyshev polinomials 5.7.2. Tschebyshev polynomial equivalence of an array factor 5.7.3. Polar diagram for Dolph-Tschebyshev arrays 5.7.4. Dolph-Tschebyshev array design

5.8. Parasitic antenna arrays 6. FREQUENCY INDEPENDENT ANNTENAS 2 hours

6.1. Principles 6.2. Types of antennas 6.3. Equiangular antenna 6.4. Log-periodic antenna 6.5. Dipole logarithmic array

7. REFLECTOR ANTENNA 5 hours 7.1. Angle reflector antenna 7.2. Analysis of 90 degree angle reflector antenna 7.3. Reflectors with angles less than 90 degrees 7.4. Parabolic reflector

7.4.1. Geometrical considerations 7.4.2. Remarcable properties 7.4.3. Practical configurations 7.4.4. Current distribution on parabolic surface 7.4.5. Radiation pattern of a parabolic reflector

[1]. Field distribution in aperture plane method [2]. Current distribution on parabolic surface method

7.4.6. Parabolic reflector gain 7.4.7. Optimal beamwidth 7.4.8. Back lobe interference 7.4.9. Aperture efficiency 7.4.10. Parabolic reflector design

8. ANTENNA MEASUREMENTS 2 hours

8.1. Introduction 8.2. Terms and definitions 8.3. Measurement techniques 8.4. Far-filed measurements

8.4.1. Range dimensioning 8.4.2. Radiation pattern measurement 8.4.3. Gain measurement 8.4.4. Measurement errors 8.4.5. Compact ranges

8.5. Near-field measurements 8.5.1. Principles and measurement techniques 8.5.2. Measurement system 8.5.3. Measurement errors

9. WAVE PROPAGATION 3 hours 9.1. Influence factors 9.2. Plane surface propagation 9.3. Path gain factor 9.4. Wave diffraction 9.5. Surface wave 9.6. Ionospheric propagation 9.7. Microwave propagation 9.8. Fading

Total ......................... 42 hours Recommended bibliography:

R.E.Collin, Antenna Theory and Design, McGraw Hill, 1969 C.A. Balanis, Antenna Theory, Analysis and Design, Wiley, 1998 R. Garo et all., Microstrip Antenna Design Handbook, Artech House, 2001 D.B. Davidson, Computational Electromagnetics for RF and Microwave Engineering, Cambridge 2005 I. Bogdan, “Antene şi propagare”, Casa Venus, Iaşi 2007

8. Laboratory works: Design of typical microstrip antennas - General design of a rectangular microstrip design - Detailed design of a rectangular microstrip design - Microstrip antenna radiation pattern plot - Design of a circular microstrip antenna - Design of linear microstrip antenna arrays Prof. Ion Bogdan, PhD

S y l l a b u s Computer Networks

1. Lecturer: Conf.dr.ing. Adrian Brezulianu 2. Course type: DM EDIS308 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 6 2 1 1 E 28 14 14 56

4. Course objectives: The discipline is aimed training skills to use local networks of computers and information and communication services offered in the Internet environment by providing knowledge about networking models, by international standards OSI and TCP / IP, networking hardware, Windows and Linux operating systems, the security of computer networks and encrypted data transmission methodologies. Specific objectives are:

□ Assimilation of basic concepts in terms of networking models used by international standards OSI and TCP / IP

□ Assimilation main functionalities used in networking hardware (NIC, switch, birdge, router, firewall)

□ Presenting a case study in terms of structured wiring as a basic element in the design of computer networks

□ Assimilation of basic concepts regarding the use of Windows and Linux operating systems; □ Assimilation of basic concepts regarding the security of computer networks (issues NIDS -

Network Intruders detection systems, secure communications methods - encryption algorithms); □ Presentation of encrypted data transmission methodologies □ Presenting intelligent solutions in terms of Distributed Computing - genetic algorithms

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The discipline objectives are in agreement with the curriculum aiming at transmitting information and creating competence for the future professionals in the field of Electronics, Telecommunications and Information Technology. The discipline is integrated in the curriculum for “Telecommunications Systems and Technologies” and uses in a specific manner knowledge and methods that were introduced in the disciplines of Computer programming and programming languages, Databases and is properly placed in the chronology of the curriculum. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills 1. Cognitive

a. Knowledge and understanding: - to understand the principles of computer networks, general features of modern cryptography; - to know the types and characteristics of various computer networks; b. Explanation and interpretation - explaining the operation of international standards OSI and TCP / IP, routing protocols; - explaining the importance of Firewall.

2. Tehnical / professional: - capacity of practical implementation of wireless local area networks, metropolitan area

network wireless transmission infrared and Bluetooth transmission - ability to use routing protocols - ability to use parallel computing methods to solve a problem

3. Attitude – value - positive feedback to the requirement of using computer networks; - implication in scientific/development activities connected with design and construction of

computer networks; - capacity of having an ethical behavior; - to be able to critically understand, to explain and interpret theoretical,

methodological and practical developments that are specific to computer networks; - to have communication abilities specific to the discipline object; - to work in an international context.

7. Teaching methods Course: - Procedural resources: In teaching the course one combines the oral exposé with video-projector use and explanations, case studies, etc. In order evidence the theoretical notions and specific applications. One creates connexions with the content of other specialty disciplines and previously introduced information within this discipline or with practical applications of the investigated problems. The course content is periodically updated with the newest communication techniques.

- methods – oral exposé, conversation, use of visual means, demonstration, synthesis of knowledge, case studies;

- academic procedures – academic course, explanation, exposé

- training procedures and organization - frontal, groups

- Material resources: - PC, video-projector, whiteboard

Applications: - Procedural resources:

- methods – conversation, discussion, practical works, use of visual means, demonstration, synthesis of knowledge, case studies;

- academic procedures – explanation, academic exposé, learning by discovery, observation

- training procedures and organization – group, individual

8. Evaluation procedure:

Continuous Evaluation:: Activity in seminar / laboratory / project / practice

Weight in final grade: 40 % (It is evaluated as a function of attendance and pertinence of oral interventions, quality of effected work, progress, etc..)

Final Evaluation: (exam.) Weight in final grade: 60 %

9. Course content: a) Course

10. C1: Introduction to networking 2 hours 11. The main components of computer networks, Internet history, 12. C2: Theory of networking 2 hours 13. Referencing the need for computer networks, international networking standards

C3: network devices. Types, network topologies and architectures 2 hours

14. Dispozitive de reţea: hub, switch, router; Clasificarea reţelelor; Tehnologia Ethernet; Tehnologia TokenRing C4: Protocols: Generalities. LAN Protocols 2 hours C5: Routing Protocols. WAN Basics 2 hours C6: Structured Cabling 2 hours

15. General considerations on structured cabling, structured network elements, network design and implementation of structured cable types, connector types C7: Wireless LAN, Wireless Metropolitan Networks, Transmission of infrared and Bluetooth transmission 2 hours

16. Wireless networks, types of equipment, antennas, Categories, Structure of the IEEE 802.11 Wireless Network Security, hardware implementation, limitations C8: Firewall 2 hours

17. Security obtained by using a firewall, a firewall components, types of firewalls, Get a firewall, How does a firewall, advantages and disadvantages of a firewall C9: General features of modern cryptography. Resolving the interception, modification and authentication messages 2 hours

18. Introduction, development of cryptography in the modern era, basic concepts, authentication problem, problem change messages C10: Applications of Geographic Networks widespread 2 hours

19. Introduction; examples C11: Unix operating system. Basics 2 hours

20. Introduction; Considerations Hardware, Boot Loader / Boot Manager, GNU / Linux rescue Structure GNU / Linux, a command structure, system files, user accounts, system permissions, networking in GNU / Linux; C12: IT security elements. - NIDS: Network Intruders Detection Systems 2 hours

21. Introduction; basic concepts C13: Parallel computing methods: Genetic Algorithms I:

22. General Aspects. Representation. Fitness Function 2 hours C14: Genetic Algorithms II: 2 hours

23. Genetic Operators. Selection Methods Total: 28 hours b) Laboratory + Project(14 + 14 hours)

24. L1: Introduction to networking 2 hours L2: OSI model 2 hours L3: The TCP / IP 2 hours L4: Network Hardware: NICs, switches 2 hours L5: network hardware devices: routers 2 hours L6: Addressing flat, hierarchical addressing 2 hours L7: Routed Protocols 2 hours L8: Routing Protocols 2 hours L9: Structured Cabling Project 2 hours L10: Linux User Items 2 hours L11: Elements Configuration / Windows Server Service 2 hours L12: Elements of IT security: viruses 2 hours L13: Optimization of functions with genetic algorimi (Matlab) - Part I 2 hours L14: Optimization of functions with genetic algorimi (Matlab) - Part II 2 hours

Total 28 hours

10. References: 1. Tools for teaching computer networking and hardware concepts Hershey, PA London Information Science Publishing 2006, ISBN 1591407354 2. Handbook of networked and embedded control systems Boston [etc.] Birkhäuser 2005, ISBN 9780817632397 3. Reţele de calculatoare si aplicaţii, Adrian Brezulianu, Eduard Mihăilescu, Alexandru Toderiţă, Ed. Politehnium, iasi, 2010 4. Note de curs – Adrian Brezulianu 5. Retele locale de calculatoare (Proiectare si Administrare) – Adrian Munteanu, Valerica Greavu Serban, Polirom, 2002 6. Retele de calculatoare – A.S. Tannenbaum, Computer Press Agora, 1996

Signatures:

Date: January, 2011 Conf. dr. ing. Adrian Brezulianu

S y l l a b u s Electronic Equipments

1. Lecturer: Laurenţiu Dimitriu, Professor, PhD 2. Course type: DM, DS EDIS309 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 6 2 -- 1 1 E 28 -- 14 14 56

4. Course objectives: Knowledge of the main aspects of non-electric quantities measurement techniques; Study the principles of operation of the transducers; Familiarization with the main analog signal processing methods, technique applicable in the EAMC; Understanding the digital techniques in systems for non-electric measuring quantities. 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum The course objectives aim at acquiring competence on the functioning and the main design and technology of EAMC. These objectives correspond to the curriculum aims. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills The discipline aims at teaching students so that they acquire the knowledge and technical skills allowing a faster integration into the research, development and / or production activity in the design of EAMC. 7. Teaching methods The teaching methods include the lecture, with a presentation at the board and/or projector. The material used can be found in the selective bibliography indicated. The examination is conducted in written form, requiring a minimum grade 5 to pass this discipline.

8. Evaluation procedure: Continuous assessment: Laboratory work / project - assessment of laboratory work is mixed. Share in final score: 25% Verification will be done in mixed mode, based on applications developed under the design theme. The lab evaluates the frequency and relevance of oral interventions - such as answers to questions and problems raised – and the involvement in the work done. On-going tests Share in final score: 10% Students take two on-going test. The test is taken on written form and it aims at assessing the theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the classroom and laboratory. Final assessment: Exam - the traditional type

Share in final score: 50% Written exam; answers to two equally important subjects and a problem, verifying competence based on the treatment of subjects and answers to questions; diagrams and charts are available to students; each subject is graded separately and the final grade is the average of the three grades. In order to pass the examination, the students must obtain at least 5 for both subjects and problem. 9. Course content: a) Course

1.Generalities on Electronic Apparatus for Measurement and Control …...……………...….... 3 hours General characteristics. Measuring methods. Static and dynamic characteristics. Errors. Noise.

2.Transducers. General principles …………………………………………………….....……. 5 hours General principles. Direct analog transducers: parameter transducers and generators transducers. Complex transducers: differential transducers, transducers with successive parameter transformations, transducers with compensation. Pulse transducers: with variable reluctance, ferro-static, with pre-recorded magnetic disc, photoelectric, inductive, transducers for spark ignition engines. Incremental and absolute numerical transducers.

3.Specific blocks in Electronic Apparatus for Measurement and Control ..………………..... 15 hours

A/D and D/A conversion circuits. Digital-to-analog conversion. Block diagram, principle, transfer characteristic, parameters. Main elements of D/A converters: voltage switches, current switches, resistor networks. Circuits for analog-digital conversion: parallel A/D converter, feedback A/D converter, two slopes A/D converter. Circuits for analog - digital conversion. Instrumentation amplifiers. Definition, characteristics, and applications. Differential amplifier. Differential amplifier with two operational amplifiers and low input impedance. Differential amplifier with two operational amplifiers and high input impedance. Quality instrumentation amplifier. Isolation amplifiers. Structure, characteristics, applications. Optical isolation servo-amplifier. Isolation amplifier of differential type. Digital isolation techniques Logarithmic amplifiers. Logarithmic amplifier with diodes. Logarithmic amplifier with diodes and thermal compensation. Ratio logarithmic amplifier. Antilogarithm amplifier with diodes. Logarithmic amplifier with one transistor. Logarithmic amplifier with two transistors. Antilogarithm amplifier with one transistor. Protection and guarding techniques. Measuring amplifier protection: parallel limitation, limitation by reaction and using Zener diodes. Analog conversion circuits. Voltage-to-frequency converter with pulse train. Frequency-to-voltage converters: with time integration, with period measuring. Voltage-to-current converters: with floating load, with grounded load. Current-to-voltage converters. Analog multipliers. Logarithmic multipliers, variable transconductance multiplier. Modulators and demodulators. Electromagnetic modulator, transistors modulators, Varicap diodes modulators. Demodulators: phase detector with diode, diode rectifier, phase detector with transistors. Amplifier with modulation-demodulation. Analog multiplexing and demultiplexing circuits Sample & hold circuits. Structure and principles. Basic type. Sample & hold circuits with integration.

4.Data acquisition systems ……………………………………………………………….…... 5 hours General structure. Classifying. Single channel acquisition systems. Multi channel acquisition systems. Total: ……28 hours b) ApplicationsLab: 11. Overview of problems specific to the discipline of laboratory activities on

EAMC. Instructions for safety ............................................................................ 2 hours; 12. Single-slope analog-to-digital converter ………………………………………. 2

hours; 13. Digital-to-analog converter ……………………………………………………. 2

hours; 14. Single-channel infrared remote control ……..…………………………………. 2

hours; 15. LCD alphanumeric display system controlled with microcontroller (I) ………... 2

hours;

16. LCD alphanumeric display system controlled with microcontroller (II) ………. 2 hours;

17. Final Discussions Total: ... 14 hours

Design: It deals with design issues for electronic devices for measurement and numerical control. Topic: digital measuring devices. Digital tachometer. Digital twist tester. Apparatus for determining the ratio of two speeds. Analog-digital conversion system for slowly varying sizes. Assigned to design activity: 7 sessions of 2 hours ………………………. Total: ... 14 hours 10. References: 1. *** - BURR-BROWN - General Catalogue, 1979 2. David F. Start, Milton Kaufman - Handbook of Operational Amplifier. Circuit Design, McGraw-Hill Book

Co., 1976 3. Jerald G. Graeme, Gene E. Tobey - Operational Amplifiers. Design and Aplications, McGraw-Hill Book

Co., 1971 4. *** - Hewlett-Packard - Optoelectronics Designer's Catalog, 1979 5. Gh. I. Mitrofan - Generatoare de impulsuri şi tensiune liniar variabilă, Editura Tehnică, Bucureşti, 1980 6. L. J. Giacoletto - Electronics Designer's Handbook, McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1976 7. M. Bodea, L. Turic, ş.a. - Aparate electronice pentru măsurare şi control, Editura Didactică şi pedagogică,

Bucureşti, 1985 8. L. Dimitriu, V. Nica - Aparete electronice de măsurare şi control, Litografia Universităţii Tehnice "Gh.

Asachi" Iaşi, 1997 9. R. Stere - Aparate electronice de măsurare şi control, Editura Didactică şi pedagogică, Bucureşti, 1968 10. E. Nicolau - Manualul inginerului electronist, Editura Tehnică, Bucureşti, 1979 11. C. Sâmpăleanu - Circuite de conversie a datelor, Editura Tehnică, Bucureşti, 1980 12. L.Dimitriu, V. Nica, D. Neacşu - Aparate electronice de măsură şi control - Îndrumar de laborator,

Litografia Universităţii Tehnice "Gh. Asachi" Iaşi, 1993 13. Liliana Vornicu, L. Dimitriu, V. Nica - Aparate electronice de măsură şi control, Litografia Universităţii

Tehnice "Gh. Asachi" Iaşi, 2001 Signatures: Date: October 1, 2010 Lecturer: Prof. Laurenţiu Dimitriu, PhD Instructors: Prof. Laurenţiu Dimitriu, PhD Assoc. Prof. Liliana Vornicu, PhD

S y l l a b u s C o m m u n i c a t i o n S y s t e m s

1. Lecturer: Prof.dr.ing. Nicolae Dumitru ALEXANDRU 2. Course type: DM EDID310 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 6 2 2 E 28 28 56

4. Course objectives: At present the communication systems are realized in digital form and they co-exist with a few number of analog systems. They vehiculate signals generated by varius information sources (audio, video, and data). The discipline is aimed at providing knowledge about coding/decoding and modulation/demodulation techniques used in signal transmission, the perturbations that affect the transmission channels and methods to mitigate them. It is furnished the theoretical support for the proper analysis of the communication systems performance and the design of component blocks. Specific objectives are:

□ Acquiring knowledge about digital techniques used for signal transmission □ Presentation of calculation methods to assess the performance of the receiver □ Learning advanced coding/decoding and modulation/demodulation techniques □ Knowing the effects of perturbation that affect various communication channels □ Presentation of correction methods for the characteristics of received signal □ Presentation of methods and transmission techniques that are specific to the

modern communication systems, performance assessment and improvement

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The discipline objectives are in agreement with the curriculum aiming at transmitting information and creating competence for the future professionals in the field of Electronics, Telecommunications and Information Technology. The discipline is integrated in the curriculum for “Telecommunications Systems and Technologies” and uses in a specific manner knowledge and methods that were introduced in the disciplines of Mathematics, Signals, circuits and systems, Probability theory and Introduction to Communications and is properly placed in the chronology of the curriculum. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills 1. Cognitive

a. Knowledge and understanding: - to know the types and characteristics of various communications types; - to understand the principles of communication systems; b. Explanation and interpretation - explaining the operation of various coding/decoding and modulation/demodulation circuits; - interpretation of the parameters of various coding/decoding and modulation/demodulation

circuits and of operation requirements in diverse structures; - explaining the importance of data acquisition for modelling or controlling a proces.

2. Tehnical / professional: - elaboration of methodologies for experiments; - processing of experimental data that were obtained for various functional blocks;

- defining analysis and simulation techniques using application software; - capacity of practical implementation for the acquired information; - capacity of conceiving block designs in the structure of communications systems and

implementing them. 3. Attitude – value

- satisfaction to analyze and simulate parts of a digital communications systems; - positive feedback to the requirement of using digital communications techniques; - implication în scientific/development activities connected with design and construction of

digital communications systems; - capacity of having an ethical behaviour;. - to be able to critically understand, to explain and interpret theoretical,

methodological and practical developments that are specific to digital communications systems and techniques;

- to have communication abilities specific to the discipline object; - to work in an international context.

7. Teaching methods Course: - procedural resources: In teaching the course one combines the oral exposé with videoprojector use and explanations, case studies, etc. In order evidence the theoretical notions and specific applications. One cretaes connexions with the content of other speciality disciplines and prevoisly introduced information within this discipline or with practical applications of the investigated problems. The course content is periodically updated with the newest communication techniques..

- methods – oral exposé, conversation, use of visual means, demonstration, synthesis of knowledge, case studies;

- academic procedures – academic course, explanation, exposé

- training procedures and organization - frontal, groups

- material resources: - PC, videoprojector, whiteboard

Applications: - procedural resources:

- methods – conversation, discussion, practical works, use of visual means, demonstration, synthesis of knowledge, case studies;

- academic procedures – explanation, academic exposé, learning by discovery, observation

- training procedures and organization – group, individual

8. Evaluation procedure:

Continuous Evaluation:: Activity in seminar / laboratory / project / practice

Weight in final grade: 25 % (It is evaluated as a function of attendance and pertinence of oral interventions, quality of effected work, progress, etc..)

Tests previous to final examination Weight in final grade: 15%

Essays, case studies and projects Weight in final grade: 10 %

Final Evaluation: (exam.)

Weight in final grade: 50 % Probes in exam evaluation:

1. Written ; tasks : 3 problems; work conditions: 2 hours, open books; weight: 60 %; Traditional Students have acces to relations that are necessary to solve the problems.

2. Optional oral examination for extra credits: discussions with 3 relevant topics; work conditions: groups of 5 students. 9. Course content: a) Course

25. I. Digital transmission of analog signals 9 hours Model of a PCM system, sampling, quantization, quality of PCM transmission,companding, PCM transmission systems, differential PCM, delta modulation, LPC coding.

26. II Signal multiplexing 3 hours Introduction, Frequency-, time-, and code multiplexing, examples, replacing the FDM systems cu TDM systems, Digital hierachies: PDH and SDH.

27. III Introduction to digital communication 6 hours Electrical representation, coding, types, spectral analysis of binary signals, codes for modulation, data recording and line transmission IV Baseband data transmission 9 hours

ISI-free signals, Nyquist criteria, baseband digital signals, partial response signals, precoding, error probability, distribution of spectral characteristic between transmitter and receiver.

28. V Digital modulations 9 hours Introduction, block schemes, fold-over, PSK, DPSK, FSK and ASK signals, signal bandwidth, QAM, QPSK, OQPSK, π/4 QPSK, QASK and OQASK, MSK, APK, SFSK, GMSK and GFSK, TFM, Q2PSK, CSK, Edge modulation, HPSK, MDMA technique.

29. VI OFDM 6 hours Introduction, advantages and disadvantages, guard intervals, OFDM generation, cyclic prefix, OFDM synchronization, an example- IEEE802.11a, power spectral density of OFDM, OFDM receiver with coherent detection, increasing the performance of OFDM, spectrum limitation, DAB, DVB.

Total: 42 hours b) Applications

LABORATORY (14 hours)

30. 1. Introduction in MATLAB 2 hours 31. 2. Uniform quantization 2 hours 32. 3. Non-uniform quantization 2 hours 33. 4. DPCM with linear prediction 2 hours 34. 5. Delta modulation 2 hours 35. 6. Baseband digital tranmission. Eye diagram 2 hours 36. 7. Scrambling 2 hours 37. 8. HDBn codes 2 hours 38. 9. Baseband digital tranmission according to Nyquist I criterion 2 hours 39. 10. Partial response signals 2 hours 40. 11. ASK and BPSK 2 hours 41. 12. FSK, QAM and QPSK 2 hours 42. 13. Numerical generation of waveforms 2 hours 43. 14. Test 2 hours

Total 28 hours 10. References: [1] Couch II L.W., “Digital and Analog Communication Systems”, Fifth Edition, Prentice Hall, 1997. [2] Glover I. A., Grant P. M., “Digital Communications” – book & solutions manual, 1st Edition, Prentice Hall, 2000. [3] Proakis J. G., Salehi M., “Communication Systems Engineering”, Second Edition, Prentice Hall, 2002. [4] Rappaport T. S., “Wireless Communications Principles and Practice”, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2002. [5] Haykin S., “Adaptive Filter Theory”, Third Edition, Prentice Hall, 1996. [6] Peebles P. Z., “Digital Communications Systems”, Prentice Hall Inc., 1987. [7] Peebles P. Z., “Probability, Random Variables and Random Signal Principles”, Second Edition, McGraw Hill Inc., 1987. [8] Proakis J. G., “Digital Communications”, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall, 1995. [9] Simon M. K., Alouini M.-S., “Digital Communication over Fading Channels: A Unified Approach to Performance Analysis”, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2000. [10] Wilson S., “Digital Modulation and Coding”, Prentice Hall, 1996. [11] Ziemer R. E., Peterson R. L., “Digital Communications and Spread Spectrum Systems”, MacMillan, 1985. [12] Ziemer R. E., Peterson R. L., “Introduction to Digital Communication”, MacMillan, 1992. [13] Meyr H., Moeneclaey M., Fechtel St. A., “Digital Communication Receivers: Synchronization, Channel Estimation, and Signal Processing”, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1998 [14] N.D.Alexandru, “Comunicaţii Digitale”, CERMI Iaşi, 2009 [15] Alexandru N.D., Graur, A., „Sisteme Spread Spectrum”. MEDIAMIRA, Cluj,. 2005 [16] Alexandru N.D., „Radiocomunicaţii digitale”, vol.II, Comunicaţii digitale, STEF, Iasi, 2006 [17] Alexandru N.D., Graur, A., „DOMOTICA”. MEDIAMIRA, Cluj, 2006 [18] Alexandru N. D., Cotae P., “Tehnica Modernă a Comunicaţiilor”, Rotaprint, Iaşi, 1990. [19] Bogdan I., “Comunicaţii Mobile”, Ed. Tehnopress, Iaşi, 2003. [20] Munteanu V., “Teoria Transmiterii Informaţiei”, Ed. “Gh. Asachi”, Iaşi, 2001.

Signatures:

Date: November 25, 2010 Lecturer Nicolae Dumitru Alexandru Instructor (s) Felix Diaconu

S Y L L A B U S MICROPROCESSORS AND MICROCONTROLLERS

1. Head of discipline: Prof. dr. Horia-Nicolai Teodorescu, m.c. A.R. 2. Type discipline: DE EDOD312A 3. Structure in the educational plan:

The number of hours per week Total number of hours per semester Semester

C S L P

Final evaluation

form C S L P Total 5 2 2 C 28 28 56

4. Contents of discipline:

a) Course (Depending on the available time and the response capacity and prior knowledge of the audience, the owner reserves the right to reduce or extend some topics) Introduction of general knowledge about the various classes of microsystems – microcontrollers,

microprocessors, DSP etc. Presentation of processor architectures: Von Newman, Harvard and extended Harvard and how to configure

the main blocks of a processor like memory, data bus, interfaces, ALU-aritmetico-logical unit etc. (examples), pipeline, comparisons between different microcontroller families.

Presentation types of sets of instructions: CISC, RISC. (examples) Presentation of microcontroller architecture from series PIC 16FX .... 17YXX, presentation of ALU, data

register and how to transfer data between them, the presentation of their control (status) register and of the instruction set for loading data in the registry, arithmetic instructions, clearing instructions at byte and bit level.

Comparisons between architectures of various microcontroller families, depending on their use (industrial, communications, dedicated) and according to the manufacturer.

RISC microcontroller: family PIC, exemplification on 16F84. The set of instructions for family PIC16XXX.

Programming environments for microcontrollers. MPLAB. Introduction, deepening and systematization of design elements of routines (procedures, functions) for signal processing. Presentation of examples of digital filters and algorithmic optimization techniques for obtaining small computing times.

Main registers. I/O. How to design and execute complex operations for a RISC processor, in the absence of specific

instructions of the respective operations. I/O Ports (input/output blocks) for external signals acquisition and sending commands to the external

devices. (examples). Memory. How to organize and acess the memory banks (direct, indirect addressing) Learning annex circuits for certain microcontrollers. Introduction and deepening of interrupt types, of operations performed by the microcontroller for the

achievement of a interrupt, of interrupt configuration registers, presentation of peripherals reading manner. Comparisons between interrupts working for different processors. Optimizing tehniques for interrupts.

Programmable timers. Types, uses of timers. (examples: PIC). Microcontroller applications. Industrial applications. Applications of signal processing

and measurement. "Embedded" applications. We reserve the right to make additions or changes to the above matter, according to the news that appeared in the field and the responsiveness and the interests of thestudents.. Total class hours: 28 b) Applications Laboratory 1. Labour protection instructions for students. Fire prevention measures

in laboratories. Rules for the labour protection specific to the laboratory. Conversions in various bases (from binary to decimal, hexa in binary etc.). Addition and difference operations with carry bit, between the two words. The representation of numbers in C2-complement of 2.

Laboratory 2. Presentation of development environment MPLABTM provided Microchip Technologies Inc., creating the skills of working with menus and windows application, the making of a first project that includes header files *. h, *.inc. and source files *. asm, presentation of directive lines (pre-processing code) and commenting of the code. [Application: Comparing two values using the subtraction instruction SUBWF on the basis of the information stored in transport bit CF (carry flag)]

Configuring the MPLAB simulator. Creating skills of working with ALU, with accumulator register and with the memory registers using the simple instructions of data transfer and addition. [Applications: Interchanging values contained in the two locations of memory using 3 ways: an auxiliary register, or without auxiliary register through the add/subtract operations, exclusively or operation].

Laboratory 3. Viewing the disassembly list, the program and data memory (register content) execution/ running of programs step by step. Syntax elements of writing assembling programs, directives for asamblor, presentation of the affected states (flag C, DC, Z) by arithmetic operations, transfer, delete, rotating operation. [Applications: The addition of two values with the preservation of the result on the 2 bytes SumH, SumL. The affition of words with 2 bytes. Dividing, multiplying of a power of 2 using rotate instructions RLF, RRF]

Laboratory 4. Presentation of conditional decision instructions at bit level, jump instruction to a label, the implementation of the loops, the view of flags used by the test instructions, troubleshoot of the program, the breakpoint introduction, the times delay computing in loops. [Applications: Generating a arithmetical series of n terms, and the computing of their sum. Generating the elements of Fibonacci series. Achievement of multiplication between two integer values – through repeated addition in a loop]

Laboratory 5. The accesing of memory banks (direct and indirect accesing). Calling of a procedure. Explaining how the stack works [Applications: Direct accesing of different memory banks: Copying the values from bank 1 to bank 0. Ordering of values copied after a clasical sorting method (bubble method). Indirect accessing of memory: Fill an area of memory (specifying the size) – with a constant value or with the value of a counter variable. Deleting of a memory zone/area].

Laboratory 6. The implementation of a elementary digital filter (weighted averaging) with an analysis window of a specified a number of samples (the order of the filter). [Applications: In the first phase is considered that the LPF filter coefficients are fixed and the accesing of samples values is made by a direct access of memmory . In a second phase we use an indirect access of memmory, the number of coefficients – order filter is specified by a global parameter.]

Laboratory 7. Learning the configuration of ports manner (setting port pins as input or output using TRISA and TRISB register from Bank 1 of memory). [Applications: Generating a waveform on a pin of PORTB. Periodic generation of a complementary waveform on other output pin. You will use delay loops – with times expressed in microseconds, milliseconds].

Laboratory 8. Serial data communication [Application: Submit to a computer a sequence of values readed from input ports, using the serial interface and save this values into a file. The computer transmits microcontroller a set of parameters to read data].

Laboratory 9. PWM signal generation for complex waveforms [For signal generation do not use a microcontroller with dedicated functions for PWM. Generation will be made by the program].

Laboratory 10. The using of digital-analog converter ADC [Application: The reading using ADC of the values provided by an external sensor and monitoring the variation limits of these values.]

Laboratory 11. The using of interrupt sources of PIC16F84. Masked and unmasked Interrupts. Automatic starting of interrupts routines. The configuring interrupt registry INTCON, OPTION_REG. [Applications: Generation using the counter TIMER0 of masked and

unmasked interruptions. For each situation will present the different way of genetating the interrupt (by the inspection of two sequences of code. ]

Laboratory 12. Ierarhizare Software of the interrupts [Application: Read a keyboard / button by external interrupt on PORTB and TIMER0. How to work with several interruptions simultaneously]

Laboratory 13. Presentation of microprojects, the loading of the machine code on microcontrollers and the test of the programme correctness through the development kits PICKIT:- the use of switches, buttons foractivatig/desactivaing some leds, the reading of the value of a potentiometer (A/D converter), the mouse control using the microcontroller, etc

Laboratory #14 Evaluation of the lab activity during the semester, recovery of laboratory sessions

Micro-projects 1. Planning and designing a muscular stimulant for passive muscle exercise, which generate stimulus for four electrodes, with four programs of stimulation. The fifth electrode will be the passive electrode (ground). The stimulant will be achieved with a PIC16F84 microcontroller or PIC10F220. The parameters needed to establish thr programmes of stimulation (duration of the stimulus, the duration between the application of two successive stimulus, the amplitude of stimulus necessary to obtain a reaction from muscle etc. are given in the laboratory about the muscular stimulant at the discipline of Medical Electronics)

2. Planning and design of a system with the microcontroller to control by the PWM method a DC engine so that the voltage equivalent (effective) by motor vary in accordance with a previously established waveform (rectangular, triangular, trapezoidal, sinusoidal, etc.)

3. The implementation of an application with the microcontroller that generate sounds as a sequence of musical notes (musical ring). Each note is obtained as a sequence of pulse, so that the period for the signal correspond to the period = 1/frequency of sounds notes. Example: f1 = f2 = 470Hz, 530Hz, f3 = 240 Hz, etc.

4. Projects suggested by students (including for M. Konteschweller contest of microcontrollers).

Club of microcontrollers (outside the teaching workload of the teachers, at the request of the students)

Total hours of application: 28 Bibliography [1]. H.N. Teodorescu, L. Jain, A. Kandel (Eds.): „Hardware Implementation of Intelligent Systems”, Physica

Verlag / Springer Verlag, 2001, ISBN 3-7908-1399-0 [2]. H.N. Teodorescu, and L.C. Jain (Eds.): „Intelligent Technologies in Rehabilitation”. CRC

Press, Florida, USA, 520 pp. + xvi, December 2000 ISBN: 0849301408 [3]. H.N. Teodorescu, D. Mlynek, A. Kandel, H.J. Zimmermann (Eds.): „Intelligent Systems and

Interfaces”, 480pp., ISBN: 079237763X, Kluwer Academic Press, Boston. 2000 [4]. H.N. Teodorescu, A. Kandel, and L.C. Jain (Eds.): „Fuzzy and Neuro-fuzzy Systems in

Medicine”, CRC Press, Florida, USA, 394 pp.+ xxviii, (ISBN0-8493-9806-1), 1998 [5]. H.N.Teodorescu, Microcontrolere si microprocesoare. Aplicatii.Ed. Politehnium 2010 [6]. H.N. Teodorescu - “Elemente de utilizare a Micro-controlerelor”, Partea I Procesarea datelor şi

aplicaţii cu Sisteme bazate pe micro-controlere, Tipografia Universităţii Tehnice „Gh. Asachi” Iaşi, 2005

[7]. Hutanu, C., Postolache, M., „Sisteme cu microprocesoare în conducerea automată a proceselor”, Vol. 1, Ediţia a 2-a, Ed. Academică, Iaşi 2001

[8]. Microchip Technology Inc., Manuale PIC. http://www.microchip.com/ [9]. Microchip Technology Inc., Note de aplicaţie, Programming Specifications for PIC16C6/7/9XX

OTP MCUs. 2001

Signatures: Date: Teacher: Prof. dr. Horia-Nicolai Teodorescu m.c. A.R.

Laboratory classes: asist.univ. dr. Zbancioc Marius-Dan

S y l l a b u s

DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSORS AND APPLICATIONS 1. Head of discipline: Prof. dr. Horia-Nicolai Teodorescu, m.c. A.R. 2. Type discipline: DS speciality discipline EDOD312B 3. Structure in the educational plan:

The number of hours per week Total number of hours per semester Semester

C S L P

Final evaluation

form C S L P Total 7 2 2 Exam 28 28 56

4. Contents of discipline:

b) Course (Depending on the available time and the response capacity and prior knowledge of the audience, the owner reserves the right to reduce or extend some topics) Introduction, deepening and systematization of knowledge on various classes of signal

processing microsystems – DSP, specialized embedded systems, and GPUs. Introduction to DSPs: principles, architectures, levels (layers) of memory, examples; TI

and Microchip DSP families as examples. Interfaces for DSPs and embedded systems – connecting to the real world (sensors,

ADCs, DACs, PWM modules); external memory access; architectures Familiarize students with DSP programming Introduction to GPUs: principles, parallelism, architectures, programming; introduction

to MPI and CUDA Comparisons between architectures of various DSP families, GPU families, and SoC

families Programming environments I/O modules Applications. Industrial applications. Communication applications

We reserve the right to make additions or changes to the above matter, according to the news that appeared in the field and the responsiveness and the interests of thestudents. Total class hours: 28 b) Applications Laboratory 1. Labour protection instructions for students. Fire prevention measures

in laboratories. Rules for the labour protection specific to the laboratory. Conversions in various bases (from binary to decimal, hexa in binary etc.). Addition and difference operations with carry bit, between the two words. The representation of numbers in C2-complement of 2.

Laboratory 2 -4. A family of simple DSPs: PICDSPs. First rules for programming. Laboratory 5,6 Interfaces Laboratory 7-11. Development of embedded systems Laboratory 12-13. GPUs

Laboratory 14 Evaluation of the lab activity during the semester, recovery of laboratory sessions

Micro-projects 1. Designing a DSP-based system for audio applications.

2. Designing an embedded system for industrial appllications

2. Designing an embedded system for communication appllications

Total hours of application: 28 Bibliography [1]. Microchip Technology Inc., DSP-PIC Manuals. http://www.microchip.com/ [2]. Microchip Technology Inc., Application notes [3]. Texas Instruments. DSP manuals and application notes [4]. H.N. Teodorescu, L. Jain, A. Kandel (Eds.): „Hardware Implementation of Intelligent

Systems”, Physica Verlag / Springer Verlag, 2001, ISBN 3-7908-1399-0 [5]. H.N. Teodorescu, D. Mlynek, A. Kandel, H.J. Zimmermann (Eds.): „Intelligent Systems and

Interfaces”, 480pp., ISBN: 079237763X, Kluwer Academic Press, Boston. 2000 Signatures: Date: Teacher: Prof. dr. Horia-Nicolai Teodorescu m.c. A.R.

Laboratory classes: asist.univ. dr. Zbancioc Marius-Dan

S y l l a b u s A u t o m o t i v e E l e c t r o n i c s

1. Lecturer : Professor Laurenţiu Dimitriu, PhD 2. Course type: DE EDOS313A 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 6 2 -- 1 -- C 28 -- 14 -- 42

4. Course objectives: Understanding the operating principles of vehicles main systems and how to use the electronic control for better performances, safety and reliability. 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: As a discipline related to a very dynamic field, the objectives are consistent with the curriculum. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills: By acquiring specific knowledge to ensure the competence necessary course of research and development, design, production and maintenance in the field of electronic control systems for automobiles. 7. Teaching methods: The teaching using free exposure, using video-projector. The course material information is available at Rotaprint multiplied (in Romanian). The course is available to students and in electronic form. There is also a book published by a recognized Publisher House. The discussions with students on the various solutions used in the systems studied. Some topics are presented using videos.

8. Evaluation procedure: Continuous assessment: Laboratory work - assessment of laboratory work is mixed. Share in final score: 25% The lab evaluates the frequency and relevance of oral interventions - such as answers to questions and problems raised – and the involvement in the work done. On-going tests Share in final score: 25% Students take two on-going test. The test is taken on written form and it aims at assessing the theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the classroom and laboratory. Final assessment: Colloquy - traditional type

Share in final score: 50% Written form; answers to two equally important subjects, verifying competence based on the treatment of subjects and answers to questions; diagrams and charts are available to students; each subject is graded separately and the final grade is the average of the two grades. In order to pass the examination, the students must obtain at least 5 for both subjects. 9. Course content: a) Course 1. Spark ignition engine. Principles, characteristics ……...…………………...…...…… 2 hours

Specific terms. Four-stroke engine working. Exchange of gases. Mixture formation system imposed rules. Ignition and combustion processes. Normal combustion in spark ignition engine. Fuel metering. Pollutant emissions, emissions limits. 2. Control structures for spark ignition engines ……………….……………...……..…… 2 hour Classic structures. Closed-loop control systems. Advanced control systems. 3. Electronic ignition control …….…………………………………………………...…. 2 hours Breakerless transistorized ignition. Induction-type generators. Hall-type pulse generators. Electronic switching of primary current of ignition coil. Block diagram of control system. Electronic ignition control circuit. Electronic dwell-angle control. Closed-loop dwell-angle control. Primary current limiting. Switching-off with engine stopped. Electronic ignition system. Signal processing in the electronic control unit. Knock control. 4. Electronic fuel injection control in spark ignition engines ………………………...…. 2 hours Overview. Mixture-formation systems. Electronic injection systems. Air supply. Air filters. Superchargers. Intake air control. Electronic idle-speed control. Electronic throttle control (ETC). Electronic boost-pressure control. Exhaust-gas recirculation (EGR). Evaporative-emissions control systems. Variable-length intake manifold. Fuel-supply system. Fuel metering. Adaptation to operating conditions. 5. Emissions-control technology …………………………………………………………….. 2 hours Generalities. Combustion process. Exhaust-gas constituents. Lambda closed-loop control. Lambda oxygen sensor. Operation of lambda closed-loop control. Catalytic exhaust treatment. Catalytic converter. Emissions limits in the EC. 6. Electronic idle-speed control ……………………………………………………...………. 1 hour Overview. Operation of electronic idle-speed control unit. Idle-speed control with electronic throttle control. 7. Braking control …………………………………………………...………………………. 2 hours Introduction. Vehicle braking fundamentals. Tire-to-road interface. Vehicle dynamics during braking. Brake system components. Antilock systems (ABS). Objectives. Antilock components. Antilock control logic fundamentals. Some economics aspects. An example of an ABS system. 8. Air bag and seat-belt tightener system ………………………….………………...…... 3 hours Introduction. Components of the system and electronic control unit. The airbag. Warning lamp. Right side seat switch. Pyrotechnical air bag inflator (gas generator). Squib. Crash detection sensors. Electronic control unit. Seat-belt tightener. Operation of seat-belt tightener system. Multipoint electromechanical sensing systems or distributed air bag systems. Single-point electronic sensing systems or central air bag. Micromachined accelerometers. Overview. Characteristics. Operation. Self-test function. Perspectives of air bag systems. 9. Cruise control ……………………………………………………………………...…... 2 hour System's operation. System's using. Components. Actuators. Main switch and warning lamp. "Set" and "Resume" switches. Brake pedal switch. Clutch pedal and automatic transmission switch. Speed sensor. Electronic control unit. An example of cruise control (GM). Structure of control system. Operation of control unit. Considerations on safety. Adaptive cruise control. 10. Trip computer ………………………………………………………………...…..…... 1 hour Trip computer basics. Basic system configurations. A trip computer example from Bosch. Components. Operation. The microcomputer.

11. Electronic automatic heating ………………………………………………………... 1 hour Introduction. Control system structure. Operation. Electronic control unit. 12. Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) ………………………….…….. 2 hours Introduction. Refrigeration principle. An example of air conditioning system (GM). Cycling electromagnetic clutch system. Refrigerant. Compressor. Condenser. Expansion tube. Evaporator. Accumulator. Cycling pressure switch. Overpressure switch. Electronic control unit. Actuators. Fans. 13. Electronic control for Diesel engines ……………………………...….…………….. 6 hours Diesel engine. Mixture formation. Direct injection. Divided-chamber combustion systems. Combustion process. Combustion problems and limits. Exhaust emissions. Control of mixture formation. Start of pump delivery and start of injection (synchronization). Injection time (injection quantity). Discharge intensity. Injection pressure. Direction of injection jet. Multiple-hole nozzle. Air-fuel ratio. Electronic glow-control unit. Glow plug. Flame plug. Preheating system using. Typical glow sequence. Electronic Diesel control system (EDC). Open-loop and closed-loop control. Data processing. Electronic control of in-line fuel-injection pump (PE). In-line control-sleeve injection pump. Nozzles and nozzle holders. Distributor-type injection pump (VE). Unit injectors (PDE) system. Common-rail injection system. Structure of common-rail system. High pressure pump. Rail pressure sensor. Pressure regulation. Injector. Electronic control unit. Exhaust control. Exhaust emissions from diesel engines. Emissions control. Engine measures. Possibilities to reduce pollutant level. Exhaust-gas recirculation (EGR). HDI engine, an example of pollutant problem solving.

Total: 28 hours b) Applications1. Main systems of the vehicles. Four-stroke spark ignition engine. Operation. Ignition system. Cooling

system – 2 hours; 2. Main systems of the vehicles. Transmission. Suspension. Brake system. Electrical system – 2 hours; 3. TDi system (Turbo-Diesel direct injection) (I) – Overview. Injector. Sensors – 2 hours; 4. TDi system (Turbo-Diesel direct injection) (II) – Actuators. Control systems – 2 hours; 5. Studiul simulat al injecţiei şi al aprinderii de la sistemul Bosch Motronic System. Fuel injection and

ignition. Simulation using the module AST04/EV – Elettronica Veneta – 2 hours; 6. Bosch Motronic System. Sensors and actuators. Simulation using the module AST05/EV – Elettronica

Veneta - 2 hour; 7. Final discussions – 2 hours.

Total: 14 hours 10. References: 1. * * - BOSCH Automotive Handbook, Third Edition, Stuttgart, 1993; 2. BONCOI, J; TURCOIU, T; TIME, AL. — Echipamente de injecţie pentru motoare cu ardere internă, Editura

Tehnică, Bucureşti 1987; 3. ADLER, U. — BOSCH - Technical Instruction, Electronic Gasoline Fuel Injection System with Lambda

Closed-Loop Control MOTRONIC, Robert Bosch GmbH, Stuttgart 1985, Delta Press Ltd.; 4. ADLER, U. — BOSCH - Technical Instruction, Electronic Gasoline Fuel Injection System with Lambda

Closed-Loop Control L-Jetronic, Robert Bosch GmbH, Stuttgart 1985, Delta Press Ltd.; 5. ADLER, U.; BAUER, H. — Engine Electronics. Bosch Technical Instruction, Robert Bosch GmbH, 1985; 6. JURGEN RONALD – Automotive Electronics Handbook, McGraw-Hill, Inc., New-York, 1995, ISBN 0-

07-033189-8. 7. ARAMĂ, C.; GRÜNWALD, B. — Motoare cu ardere internă. Procese şi caracteristici, Editura Tehnică,

Bucureşti, 1966; 8. DIMITRIU, L. — Electronică pentru automobile, Rotaprint, Universitatea Tehnică “Gh. Asachi” Iaşi, 2003; 9. DIMITRIU, L.; PANTILIMONESCU, FL.; NICULESCU, T. — Sisteme Electronice de control pentru

automobile. Injecţia de benzină şi aprindrea, Editura Militară, Bucureşti 1995; 10. DIMITRIU, L. – Electronică pentru automobile, ISBN 978-973-8930-35-3, Editura Fides, Iaşi, 2008; 11. STRATULAT, M.; COPAE, I. — Alimentarea motoarelor cu aprindere prin scânteie. Scheme comentate de

carburatoare, injecţia de benzină şi lemente auxiliare, Editura Tehnică, Bucureşti, 1992. 12. NEGURESCU, N.; PANĂ, C.; POPA, M.G. – Motoare cu ardere internă. Procese, Editura MATRIX ROM,

Bucureşti, 1995 13. PANĂ, C.; POPA, M.G.; NEGURESCU, N. – Motoare cu ardere internă. Cinematică, dinamică, echilibraj,

Editura MATRIX ROM, Bucureşti, 1997

14. ADLER, U.; BAUER, H. — Pkw-Bremsanlagen. Techniche Unterrichtung, Robert Bosch GmbH, 1991; 15. ADLER, U.; BAUER, H. — Schaltzeichen und Schaltplane fur Kraftfahrzeuge. Techniche Unterrichtung,

Robert Bosch GmbH, 1990; 16. ADLER, U.; BAUER, H. — Generatoren. Techniche Unterrichtung, Robert Bosch GmbH, 1993; 17. ADLER, U.; BAUER, H. — Elektronisches Benzineinspritzsystem mit Lambda-Regelung L-Jetronic.

Techniche Unterrichtung, Robert Bosch GmbH, 1985; 18. ADLER, U.; BAUER, H. — Elektronisches Benzineinspritzsystem mit Lambda-Regelung Mono-Jetronic.

Techniche Unterrichtung, Robert Bosch GmbH, 1991; 19. ADLER, U.; BAUER, H. — Mechanisch-elektroninisches Benzineinspritzsystem mit Lambda-Regelung KE-

Jetronic. Techniche Unterrichtung, Robert Bosch GmbH, 1985; 20. ADLER, U.; BAUER, H. — Mechanisches Benzineinspritzsystem mit Lambda-Regelung K-Jetronic.

Techniche Unterrichtung, Robert Bosch GmbH, 1985; 21. ADLER, U.; BAUER, H. — Elektronik und Mikrocomputer. Techniche Unterrichtung, Robert Bosch GmbH,

1991; 22. ADLER, U.; BAUER, H. — Abgastechnik fur Ottomotoren. Techniche Unterrichtung, Robert Bosch GmbH,

1990; 23. ADLER, U.; BAUER, H. — Zundkerzen. Techniche Unterrichtung, Robert Bosch GmbH, 1990;

Signatures:

Date: January 10, 2011

Lecturer: Professor Laurenţiu Dimitriu, PhD

Instructor: Assoc. Prof. Liliana Vornicu, PdD

S y l l a b u s C o u r s e n a m e

T E L E C O M M U N I C A T I O N P O W E R S U P P L I E S 1. Lecturer Ovidiu Ursaru, PhD 2. Course type: DE EDOS313B 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 6 2 1 C 28 14 42

4. Course objectives: The students acquire information related to industrial electronics and are trained to deal with new requirements in the field. 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The course objectives aim at acquiring competence on the functioning and the main design and technology problems of electronic systems in power electronics. These objectives correspond to the curriculum aims. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills The discipline aims at teaching students so that they acquire the knowledge and technical skills allowing a faster integration into the research, development and / or production activity in the design of power electronics circuits. 7. Teaching methods The teaching methods include the lecture, with a presentation at the board and/or projector. The material used can be found in the selective bibliography indicated. The examination is conducted in written form, requiring a minimum grade 5 to pass this discipline.

8. Evaluation procedure: Continuous assessment: Laboratory work / project - assessment of laboratory work is mixed. Share in final score: 20% Verification will be done in mixed mode, based on applications developed under the design theme. The lab evaluates the frequency and relevance of oral interventions - such as answers to questions and problems raised – and the involvement in the work done. On-going tests - written evaluation. Share in final score: 20%

Students take an on-going test. The test is taken on a computer and it aims at assessing the theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the classroom and laboratory. Final assessment: Exam - the traditional type Share in final score: 60% Written exam; answers to two equally important subjects, verifying competence based on the treatment of subjects and answers to questions; diagrams and charts are available to students; each subject is graded separately and the final grade is the average of the two grades. In order to pass the examination, the students must obtain at least 5 for both subjects.

9. Course content: a) Course

I. Introduction ………………………………………………………………………...2 hours II. Power semiconductors: Thyristors, Power bipolar transistors, Power MOSFET, Insulated gate biploar transistors,…………………………………………………….6 hours III. Single-phase diode rectifiers, three-phase diode rectifiers, Single-phase controlled rectifiers, Three-phase controlled rectifiers, Filtering systems in rectifier circuits……8hours IV. Inverters: Single -phase voltage source inverters, Three -phase voltage source inverters, Current source inverters, Modulating Techniques and Control Strategies....................6hours V. DC-DC converter: buck converter, boost converter, buck-boost converter, cuk converter, forward converter, push-pull converter, fly-back converter……………….6hours Total: 28 hours b) Applications

1. DC Motor control with: Single-phase diode rectifiers, three-phase diode rectifiers, Single-phase controlled rectifiers, Three-phase controlled rectifiers…………4 hours

2. Applications of inverters: Single-phase voltage source inverters, Three -phase voltage source inverters, Simulation of power electronic circuits and electric machines, Simulations of modulating Techniques and control strategies......6 hours

3. Applications of dc-dc converters: buck, boost, buck-boost, push-pull, forword and flyback.............................................................................................................4 hours.

Total: 14 hours

10. References: 1. M. Rashid, ‘’Power Electronics Handbook’’, Academic Press, SUA, 2001 2.N. Mohan, T. Undeland, W. Robbins,,Power Electronics-Converters, Applications, and Design’’Johan Wiley& Sons, Inc, New York

3.M. Lucanu, 1980, Electronică industrială, Rotaprint I. P. Iaşi,. 4.F. Ionescu, s.a.m.d ,1997,,Electronica de Putere,, Ed. TEHNICA,, Bucuresti ,

5.M. Lucanu ,C. Galea, O. Ursaru, N. Lucanu, 2001,Electronică de putere, Vol. 1, Ed. ICPE, Bucuresti,. 6. O.Ursaru, C.Aghion, M.Lucanu,, Aplicatii in electronica de putere,, Ed. PIM, Iasi, 2010

Signatures:

Date: Lecturer: Ovidiu Ursaru, PhD. 21-01-2011 Instructor: Ovidiu Ursaru, PhD.

S y l l a b u s T r a i n i n g

1. Lecturer : 2. Course type: IA EDID314 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 6 - - Com-

pressed - E - - 120 - 120

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 6 - - Cond. - E - - 120 - 120

4. Course objectives: - Presentation of the production/reasearch unit specific technologies and equipments. 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The objectives of this discipline are included in the „Electronics and Telecommunications Engineering” profile curriculum. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills Cognitive, technical or professional skills

o Cognitive skills: familiarization with different equipments and technologies for design, development, instalation and mainenance.

o Technical and profesional skills : instalation and configuration for simple equipments, configuration and operating issues.

o Tansversal skills: knowledge of the operating methodologies and basic aspects of the technological discipline

7. Teaching methods

• Oral presentation based on PowerPoint slide shows • Teaching in formal and informal environment and familiarization with specific

technological performances evaluation. • Technological applications, practical implementation and evaluation of the results.

7. Evaluation procedure: Continuous evaluation: 20% Final evaluation 80 %

9. Course content: b) Laboratory

8. Specific Work Security Regulation............................................................................. 4 h 9. Presentation of the equipments and technologies ....................................................... 8 h 10. Presentation of the operating mode ............................................................................ 8 h 11. Technological process exemplification .................................................................... 92 h 12. Weekly revision ......................................................................................................... 4 h 13. Final test ..................................................................................................................... 4 h Total: 120 h

Signatures: Teach. assist. Felix Diaconu

30.01 2011

S y l l a b u s D i g i t a l C o m m u n i c a t i o n s

1. Lecturer Prof.dr.ing. Nicolae Dumitru ALEXANDRU 2. Course type: DM EDIS401 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 7 3 1 2 E 42 14 28 84

4. Course objectives: The objective of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and understanding of digital telecommunications systems with special emphasis on wireless communications. The students should be capable of choosing an appropriate modulation system for a given application, do a comparative analysis of the noise performance of different modulation systems, and design appropriate receiver structures to achieve given design goals. Students learn some of the most fundamental receiver architectures and schemes used in practice.

It analyses transmission in fading multipath channel and determines the performance of various modulation formats. Several diversity techniques are discussed to overcome transmission problems encountered due to multipath propagation. Methods of diversity can be extended to frequency, time and space diversity as well as to code diversity. Specific objectives are:

□ Acquiring knowledge about digital techniques used for signal transmission □ Learning the advanced coding/decoding and modulation/demodulation techniques □ Knowing the effects of perturbation that affect the mobile communication channels □ Presentation of correction methods for the characteristics of received signal □ Presentation of methods and transmission techniques that are specific to the modern

communication systems, performance assessment and improvement

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The discipline objectives are in agreement with the curriculum aiming at transmitting information and creating competence for the future professionals in the field of Electronics, Telecommunications and Information Technology. The discipline is integrated in the curriculum for “Telecommunications Systems and Technologies” and uses in a specific manner knowledge and methods that were introduced in the disciplines of Mathematics, Signals, circuits and systems, Introduction to Communications and Communication Systems and is properly placed in the chronology of the curriculum. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills 1. Cognitive

a. Knowledge and understanding: - To know the types and characteristics of digital techniques used in several types of

communications; - To understand digital communication techniques; - deep knowledge of theoretical, methodologic and practical developments used in

digital communication techniques. b. Explanation and interpretation - explaining the operation of various digital receiver circuits;

- interpretation of the parameters of various coding/decoding and modulation/demodulation circuits and of operation requirements;

- explaining the importance of data acquisition for modelling or controlling a system. 2. Technical / professional:

- elaboration of methodologies for experiments; - Processing of experimental data that were obtained for various functional blocks; - Defining analysis and simulation techniques using application software; - Capacity of practical implementation for the acquired information; - Capacity of conceiving block designs in the structure of communications systems and

implementing them. 3. Attitude – value

- Satisfaction to analyze and simulate parts of a digital communications systems; - Positive feedback to the requirement of using digital communications techniques; - implication in scientific/development activities connected with design and construction of

digital communications systems; - capacity of having an ethical behaviour;. - To be able to critically understand, to explain and interpret theoretical,

methodological and practical developments that are specific to digital communications systems and techniques;

- To have communication abilities specific to the discipline object; - To work in an international context.

7. Teaching methods Course: - procedural resources: In teaching the course one combines the oral exposé with videoprojector use and explanations, case studies, etc. In order evidence the theoretical notions and specific applications. One cretaes connexions with the content of other speciality disciplines and prevoisly introduced information within this discipline or with practical applications of the investigated problems. The course content is periodically updated with the newest communication techniques..

- methods – oral exposé, conversation, use of visual means, demonstration, synthesis of knowledge, case studies;

- academic procedures – academic course, explanation, exposé

- training procedures and organization - frontal, groups

- material resources: - PC, videoprojector, whiteboard

Applications: - procedural resources:

- methods – conversation, discussion, practical works, use of visual means, demonstration, synthesis of knowledge, case studies;

- academic procedures – explanation, academic exposé, learning by discovery, observation

- training procedures and organization – group, individual

8. Evaluation procedure:

Continuous Evaluation:: Activity in seminar / laboratory / project / practice

Weight in final grade: 20 % (It is evaluated as a function of attendance and pertinence of oral interventions, quality of

effected work, progress, etc..) Tests previous to final examination

Weight in final grade: 10% Essays, case studies and projects

Weight in final grade: 10 % Final Evaluation: (exam.)

Weight in final grade: 60 % Probes in exam evaluation:

1. Written ; tasks: 3 problems ; work conditions: 2 hours, open books; weight: 60 %; Traditional Students have acces to relations that are necessary to solve the problems.

2. Optional oral examination for extra credits: discussions with 3 relevant topics; work conditions: groups of 5 students. 9. Course content: a) Course

44. I. Probabilities and random variables 12 hours Introduction, random variables, discrete andcontinuous random variables, means and moments, examples of distributions (discrete binomial, Poisson, uniform, Gaussian, lognormal, Rayleigh, Rice, 2χ , Nakagami), transforms of random variables, central limit theorem.

45. II Reception techniques 6 hours Introduction, integrate&dump filter, matched filter detection, sampled matched filter correlation receiver, detection of binary modulation signals – ASK, FSK and PSK, MPSK detection, non-coherent detection of MFSK, probability of error for baseband binary and multi-level transmissions, error probability for ASK, FSK, PSK, MPSK and QASK.

46. III Introduction to spread spectrum 6 hours Spread spectrum systems (pseudorandom sequences, DLL tracking circuits, code synchronization), Chirp systems IV Fading and diversity 8 hours Introduction, effects of fading on transmission performance, DPSK and differenţial detection,

model of fading channel, diversity, combination strategies (SD, MRC, EGC), RAKE receiver and its performance, mathematical modeling of a fading

47. V Diversity and MIMO systems 10 hours Introduction, an exemple – IEEE802.11n, spatial multiplexing, diversity at receiver’ site, space-time coding, space-time trellis coding, space-time block coding, Alamouti’s scheme and its generalization.

Total: 42 hours b) Applications

LABORATORY (14 hours)

48. 1. Random variables. Probability density and cumulative distribution functions. Moments 2 hours

49. Matlab - comm_tbx 50. 2. Random processes. Stationarity and ergodicity 2 hours 51. Matlab - comm_tbx 52. 3.Matched filter detection. ”integrate & dump” filter 2 hours 53. Matlab - comm_tbx 54. 4. Design of digital communication systems that are affected by noise 2 hours

55. Matlab - comm_tbx 56. 5. MPSK detection 2 hours 57. Matlab - simulink 58. 6. QAM receivers 2 hours 59. Matlab - simulink 60. 7. Rake receivers 2 hours 61. Matlab - simulink

SEMINARY (14 hours) 62. 1. Calculation of power spectral density for several line codes 2 hours 63. 2. Random variables 2 hours 64. 3. Random processes 2 hours 65. 4. Digital modulation. Complex envelope of band-pass signals 2 hours 66. 5. Calculation of error probability 2 hours 67. 6. Generation of maximal length sequences with specified delay 2 hours 68. 7. Trellis coded modulation. Viterbi algorithm 2 hours

Total 28 hours 10. References: [1] Couch II L.W., “Digital and Analog Communication Systems”, Fifth Edition, Prentice Hall, 1997. [2] Proakis J. G., Salehi M., “Communication Systems Engineering”, Second Edition, Prentice Hall, 2002. [3] Rappaport T. S., “Wireless Communications Principles and Practice”, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2002. [4] Glover I. A., Grant P. M., “Digital Communications” – book & solutions manual, 1st Edition, Prentice

Hall, 2000. [5] Meyr H., Moeneclaey M., Fechtel St. A., “Digital Communication Receivers: Synchronization, Channel

Estimation, and Signal Processing”, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1998 [6] Peebles P. Z., “Digital Communications Systems”, Prentice Hall Inc., 1987. [7] Peebles P. Z., “Probability, Random Variables and Random Signal Principles”, Second Edition, McGraw

Hill Inc., 1987. [8] Proakis J. G., “Digital Communications”, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall,1995. [9] Simon M. K., Alouini M.-S., “Digital Communication over Fading Channels: A Unified Approach to

Performance Analysis”, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2000. [10] Wilson S., “Digital Modulation and Coding”, Prentice Hall, 1996. [11] Ziemer R. E., Peterson R. L., “Digital Communications and Spread Spectrum Systems”, MacMillan, 1985. [12] Ziemer R. E., Peterson R. L., “Introduction to Digital Communication”, MacMillan, 1992 [13] N.D.Alexandru, “Comunicaţii Digitale”, CERMI Iaşi, 2009 [14] Alexandru N.D., Graur, A., „Sisteme Spread Spectrum”. MEDIAMIRA, Cluj,. 2005 [15] Alexandru N.D., „Radiocomunicaţii digitale”, vol.II, Comunicaţii digitale, STEF, Iasi, 2006 [16] Bogdan I., “Comunicaţii Mobile”, Ed. Tehnopress, Iaşi, 2003. Signatures: Date: January 19, 2011 Lecturer Nicolae Dumitru Alexandru Instructor (s) Felix Diaconu

CURRICULUM

of MOBILE COMMUNICATIONS

1. Lecturer : Prof. univ. dr. ing. Ion Bogdan 2. Course type: DM EDIS402 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester C S L P

Final examination C S L P

Total

7 3 1 1 E 42 14 14 70 4. Objectieves: Cellular concept Mobile channel characterization Multiple acces technicques for mobile communication networks Resource allocations Mobile communication standards: GSM, DECT, GPRS, EDGE, UMTS, cdmaOne, cdma2000, HSPA, LTE 5. Teaching techniques: Exposition, sketches on whiteboard, videoprojection, on line acces for pdf text, interactive exercizes, homework, computer simulations, miniprojects, discussions. 6. Exam requirements: Proving the understanding of theoretical and practical aspects of mobile communications by solving appropriate problems. 7. Content:

69. CELLUAR SYISTEMS BASICS

69.1. Cellular concept 69.2. Cellular geometry properties 69.3. Architecture of a cellular system 69.4. Quality of service 69.5. Capacity of a cellular system 69.6. Traffic theory

70. MOBILE CHANNEL: MEAN POWER AT RECEPTION

4 hours

5 hours

5 hours

70.1. Path loss 70.1.1. Physical phenomena involved in wave propagation 70.1.2. Free space path loss 70.1.3. Wave attenuation at reflection 70.1.4. Wave attenuation at diffraction

70.2. Large scale path loss models 70.3. Walfish-Bertoni model 70.4. Okumura model 70.5. Deterministic models

71. MOBILE CHANNEL: FADING MODELS 71.1. Scattered field model 71.2. Impulse response model 71.3. Statistics of the arrival times 71.4. Statistics of the received waves’ amplitude 71.5. Statistics of the received waves’ phase

71.6. Delay spread and coherence bandwidth 71.7. Doppler spread and coherence time 71.8. Types of fading 71.9. Diversity techniques 71.10. Combining techniques’ analysis

72. MULTIPLE ACCESS TECHNIQUES 72.1. Selection criteria 72.2. Frequency division (FDMA) 72.3. Time division (TDMA)

8 hours

6 hours

4 hours

4 hours

72.4. Packet reservation (PRMA) 72.5. Orthogonal frequency division (OFDMA) 72.6. Spread spectrum techniques 72.7. Code division multiple access (CDMA)

73. RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 73.1. Channel allocation techniques 73.2. Classes of allocation algorithms 73.3. Fixed allocation 73.4. Dynamic allocation 73.5. Comparison of fixed and dynamic techniques 73.6. Hybrid techniques 73.7. Flexible techniques 73.8. Fixed and dynamic allocation 73.9. Handover prioritisation 73.10. Reuse partitioning 73.11. New techniques for increasing frequency efficiency 73.12. Bandwidth dimensioning

74. DIGITAL MOBILE COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS (2G) 74.1. Architecture of a GSM system

74.1.1. Structure of GSM network 74.1.2. Mobility management 74.1.3. Security and privacy 74.1.4. Multiple access 74.1.5. Communication bursts 74.1.6. Logical and physical channels 74.1.7. Synchronisation and location of a mobile terminal 74.1.8. Call establishment 74.1.9. Voice processing 74.1.10. Channel coding

26. Voice coding 27. Data coding

74.1.11. Modulation 74.2. Architecture of DECT systems

74.2.1. Choosing standard parameters 74.2.2. DECT physical level 74.2.3. Forseen developments

74.3. cdmaOne 75. 2.5G SYSTEMS

75.1. HSCSD 75.2. GPRS

75.2.1. Mobility management states 75.2.2. Multiple access and resource management 75.2.3. GPRS logical channels 75.2.4. Physical channels for packet data transmissions 75.2.5. Channel coding 75.2.6. Interaction with IP nets

75.3. EDGE 76. IMT-2000 STANDARD FAMILY (3G)

76.1. UMTS 76.1.1. Architecture 76.1.2. Power control

6 hours 76.1.3. Handover 76.1.4. Phyisical level 76.1.5. Communication channels

76.2. cdma2000 76.3. TD-SCDMA

Total ......................... 42 hours Recommended bibliography:

[1] R.S. Rappaport, Wireless Communications, Prentice Hall, 2002 [2] M. Mouly, M.B. Pautet., The GSM System for Mobile Communications, 1993 [3] J. Korhonen., Introduction to 3G Mobile Communications,Artech House, 2001 [4] Bogdan, “Comunicaţii Mobile”, Casa Venus, Iaşi 2006 [5] http://www.etsi.org

8. Laboratory works: - Path loss: free space, reflection, diffraction - Mobile channel models: Okumura, Egli - Ray tracing and ray launching - Channel allocation techniques 9. Project: Individual or group (2-3 students) themes on channel allocation techniques, coverage estimation, pwer control (mostly Matlab implementations). Prof. Univ. Dr. Ing. Ion Bogdan

S Y L L A B U S

OPTICAL COMUNICATIONS 1. Lecturer: Professor Irinel CASIAN-BOTEZ 2. Course type: DM EDIS403 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 7 2 2 C 28 28 56

4. Course objectives: The aim of the course is to provide basic knowledge in the field of optical communications: fiber optic cables, optical transmitters (light emitting diode, laser diode), optical receivers (PIN diode, avalanche diode), the design of optical fiber links, optical amplifiers, optical networks. 5. Consistency between discipline and curriculum goals: 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical and professional skills 7. Teaching methods:

The course is taught by slides. The laboratory uses a kit manufactured by OPTEL. 8. Evaluation procedure:

(La fiecare formă de evaluare se precizează tipul: tradiţional, cu calculatorul, mixt.)

Evaluarea continuă: Activitatea la seminar / laborator / proiect / practică

Share in final grade: 30%

(Se evaluează în funcţie de frecvenţa şi pertinenţa intervenţiilor orale, calitatea lucrărilor efectuate, consemnarea sistematică a informaţiilor semnificative generate de student în grupul de aplicaţie.)

Testele pe parcurs

Share in final grade: 0 %

(Se utilizează pentru evaluarea pe parcursul semestrului a cunoştinţelor, teoretice şi / sau practice acumulate la orele de curs şi de aplicaţii.)

Lucrări de specialitate

Share in final grade: 0%

(Se utilizează pentru evaluarea competenţelor generale şi specifice pe baza unor lucrări elaborate de student precum: rezumate, sinteze ştiinţifice, eseuri tematice, referate, proiecte, rapoarte de activitate practică sau de cercetare, studii de caz, recenzii etc.)

Evaluarea finală: (Se precizează: examen sau colocviu.) Share in final grade: 70%

Proba(ele):

(Se menţionează fiecare probă şi se precizează: a) categoria de sarcini (rezolvare de probleme); b) condiţiile de lucru (scris, 2 ore, orice material bibliografic autorizat) şi c) ponderea în procente a fiecărei probe în nota examenului.) 20%

9. Course content: a) Lecture notes 1. Electromagnetic optics ……………………………………………………...........……………………..2h

1.1. Electromagnetic Theory of Light 1.2. Dielectric Media 1.3. Monocromatic Electromagnetic Waves 1.4. Elementary Electromagnetic Waves 1.5. Absorption and Dispersion 1.6. Pulse Propagation in Dispersive Media 1.7. Planar-Mirror Resonators

2. Polarization And Crystal Optics ……………………………………………......…………………….. 3h 2.1. Optics Of Anisotropic Media 2.2. Optical Activity and Faraday Effect 2.3. Electro-Optics of Anisotropic Media

3. Guided-Wave Optics …………………………………………………………...........………………… 3h 3.1. Planar-Mirror Waveguides 3.2. Planar Dielectric Waveguides 3.3. Two-Dimensional Waveguides 3.4. Optical Coupling in Waveguides

4. Fiber Optics ………………………………………………………………………………........………. 5 h 4.1. Step-Index Fibers 4.2. Graded-Index Fibers 4.3. Attenuation and Dispersion

5. Semiconductor Photon Sources …………………………………………………………..…………… 6h 5.1. Light-Emitting Diodes 5.2. Semiconductors Laser.

6. Semiconductor Photon Detectors …………………………………….............………………………. 6 h 10.1 Properties of Semiconductor Photodetectors 10.2 Photoconductors 10.3 Photodiodes 10.4 Avalanche Photodiodes

11 Fiber-Optic Communication ……………………………………….………….……………………… 3h 11.1 Components of the Optical Fiber Link 11.2 Modulators, Multiplexing and Coupling 11.3 System Performance 11.4 Receiver Sensitivity 11.5 Coherent Optical Communications

Total 28 H b) Laboratory

18. Transmission of analog DC signals over an Optical Fibre ...........................................2 h

19. Operation of the Fibre Optic Puls Transmitter...............................................................2 h

20. Determination of the parameters of the tranmitter ........................................................ 2h

21. Determination of the parameters of the pulse receiver .................................................. 2h

22. Transmission of audio-frequency over a fibre optic link .............................................. 2h

23. Modulation of a pulse carrier by a DC level ................................................................. 2h

24. Pulse Amplitude Modulation: its transmission via fibre optics .................................... 2h

Total 14 h 10. References 1. Djafar K. Mynbaev, Lowell L. Scheiner, “Fiber Optic Communications Technology”, 2. Saleh Bahaa, “Fundamentals of photonics” Semnături: Titular curs: Irinel CASIAN-BOTEZ Titular(i) aplicaţii: Radu DAMIAN, Daniel MATASARU Data: 09.03.2011

S y l l a b u s ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY

1. Teaching staff: Eng. D. IONESCU, PhD., Lecturer 2. Discipline type: DM EDIS404 3. Discipline structure:

Numbers of hours per week Numbers of hours per semester Semester

C S L P

Final evaluation

C S L P Total 7 2 - - 2 E 28 - - 28 56

4. Objectives of the course: • Students will cumulate theoretical and practical knowledge specific for the 'Electronics

Technology' discipline • Presenting of the manufacturing technologies for printed circuit boards; technological

stage details • Presenting of the PCB design tools • Presenting of the compatibility rules for PCB • Students training for an electrical scheme implementation at PCB level • Students training for an optimal using of the on-line component catalogues • Introduction of the new structures and technologies specific for the modern packaging:

lead-free design, system-on-a-chip, system-on-a-package • Presenting of the test methodology for the multi-layer PCB of a « system-on-package »; the

CAD testing; automatic test equipment (ATE). 5. Concordance between the discipline objectives and university curricula: Course objectives are in agreement with the university curricula and are conceived for the students training in the field of Electronics Technology, adding new applicative competences to the cumulated knowledge, specific for the considered domain. 6. Learning results, expressed in cognitive, technical or professional competences • Students will cumulate knowledge specific for the Electronics Technology field • Understanding the role of electronic technologies in Electronics evolution • Cumulating knowledge about the manufacturing technologies for printed circuit boards;

technological stage details • Cumulating knowledge about the PCB design tools • Cumulating knowledge about the compatibility rules for PCB • Students will be able to implement an electrical scheme at PCB level, to realize, verify

and optimize the printed circuit board • Students will be able to use the on-line component catalogues and to select the optimal

device for a given PCB configuration • Cumulating knowledge about the new structures and technologies specific for the modern

packaging: lead-free design, system-on-a-chip, system-on-a-package • Cumulating knowledge about the test methodology for the « systems-on-package », about

the CAD testing methods and about the structure of an automatic test equipment (ATE). 7. Teaching methods:

• Course presentation with help of the video projector • Using of the dedicated computer programs for the electronic circuits design, PCB

design, verification and optimization (including the compatibility rules check) and mathematical calculus

• Exam requirements: cumulating knowledge presented in the course; completing the lab project.

8. Evaluation procedure:

Continuous evaluation: Project activity (CAD design of an electronic circuit): 5% of the final grade. Computer evaluation. Laboratory activity (CAD design of the PCB and PCB optimization): 20% of the final grade. Mixed evaluation. Homework (reports, case studies): 5% of the final grade. Traditional evaluation.

Final evaluation is performed on an exam: Colocvium (theory): 70% of the final grade. Viva.

9. Discipline content:

a) Course: HOURS: Article II. INTRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY. ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY Terms of reference. Definition for the notions of technology and engineering. Role of the electronics technology for the electronics evolution. 0.5 MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES FOR PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS (PCBs) CONTACTS IN ELECTRONICS. 0.5

Wiring; wire-wrap technology. PCB MANUFACTURING PROCESSES 3.0 History. Generalities. Materials for PCB PCB manufacturing technologies (Common technological stages. The substractive process. The additive

process. Synthesis processes.) PCB PRINTING PROCESS 1.5 Generalities. Obtaining of the photomask. Photoengraving (photographic methods) Screen printing (serigraphy). Other procedures. ETCHING PROCESS 0.5 Generalities. Etching agents. Installations for etching Decontamination Drills etching and removing of the burrs SOLDERING PROCESS Generalities. Theoretical bases of the soldering process. SOFT SOLD ALLOYS 0.5 Generalities. Requirements. Solder alloys based on tin and lead. Novel lead-free solder alloys. SOLDER FLUXES 0.5 Generalities. Requirements. Categories of solder fluxes Fluxing technologies PREHEATING SOLDERING TECHNOLOGIES 2.5 Generalities. Classification of the soldering methods. Soldering with the soldering hammer Soldering by immersion in static solder baths Wave soldering Reflow soldering (Deposition of the solder paste. Soldering temperature profile. Reflow technologies.)

Post-soldering cleaning PCB ASSEMBLY 0.5 Generalities. Assembly restrictions in the PCB design. Boards structure and configuration Mechanical aspects in the PCB design. (Boards positioning. Available area for components. Mechanical

aberrations and tolerances. ) ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF THE PCB 1.0 Conducting paths resistance Currents through the conducting paths Electric capacitate between the conducting paths Conducting paths inductance Characteristic impedance of the conducting paths Dielectric strength of the board material. Conducting paths spacing. COMPUTER ASSISTED DESIGN OF THE PCB. 0.5 Computer programs for PCB design. Characteristics Stages in the computer assisted PCB design process Verifying and optimizing the PCB Design rules checking TECHNOLOGY OF HEAT EVACUATION IN ELECTRONICS HEAT TRANSFER AT PCB LEVEL. THERMAL RESISTANCES. THERMAL REGIME. 0.5 THERMAL REGIME OF THE ACTIVE DEVICES 1.0 Thermal stress of the semiconductor devices Thermal resistances at the semiconductor devices Thermal calculus of the devices without radiator Thermal calculus of the devices with radiator Calculus of the radiator for electronic devices. Technological aspects in radiators usage. THERMAL REGIME OF THE CONDUCTORS AND PASSIVE COMPONENTS 0.5 Thermal regime of the conductors. Conductors cross-section in function of the heat dissipation. Thermal regime of the resistors Thermal regime of the capacitors. Particularities of the electrolytic capacitors. THERMAL REGIME OF THE ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENTS. TECHNIQUES FOR HEAT EVACUATION.

1.0 General aspects regarding the evacuation of the heat generated in the electronic equipments. Air cooling by natural convection, conduction and radiation Cooling by forced convection. Ventilators. Liquid cooling Evaporative cooling Thermal pipe

LEAD-FREE DESIGN OF THE PCB PRESENTING OF THE ACTUAL TENDENCIES IN PCB DESIGN 0.5 Actual international standardization in PCB design and UE legislation CHARACTERISTICS OF THE EARTH FRIENDLY PCB DESIGN (GREEN PCB) 3.0 Lead-free soldering paste Halogen-free materials for PCB board Modifications imposed by the new materials usage in the manufacturing technologies Characteristics of the final product EMBEDDED CIRCUIT BOARDS PCB CHARACTERISTICS FOR « SYSTEMS-ON-PACKAGE » AND « SYSTEMS-ON-A-CHIP » 4.0 General presentation

Manufacturing technologies. Comparative analysis. SOP examples. Analysis and discussions. Georgia Tech’s PRC process. Actual tendencies in the PCB evolution

LTCC AND ORGANIC TECHNOLOGIES 3.0 Co-fired ceramic technologies (HTCC, LTCC). Characteristics and particularities. Advantages. Manufacturing stages of HTCC technology Manufacturing stages of LTCC technology Low-temperature organic processes

TESTING METHODOLOGY FOR THE MULTI-LAYER PCB OF A « SYSTEM-ON-PACKAGE » 3.0 Structure of an Automatic Test Equipment (ATE)

ATE example. Description and analysis.

Total course hours......................... 28 hours

b) Applications: Seminaries: -

Project: computer assisted design of a complex electronic circuit (AC/DC power supply for a small-signal electronic circuit, including: transformer, rectifier, smoothing, regulator), using calculus programs (Mathcad, Matlab). 14

Laboratory: computer assisted design for the PCB, PCB verification and optimization, with help of the Orcad program and using the on-line catalogues for electronic components, the compatibility rules and the actual standardization documentation. 14

Total of applications hours.................... 28 hours

10. References (selective) At the UTI Library:

1. Douglas Brooks , Signal integrity issues and printed circuit board design , Prentice Hall PTR , Upper Saddle River, NJ, Prentice Hall modern semiconductor design series, 2003, engl., Bibl.Automatica Calculatoare( 1/ 0)

2. Jon Varteresian, Fabricating printed circuit boards, Newnes, Amsterdam, 2002, engl., Bibl.Automatica Calculatoare( 1/ 0)

3. Mark I. Montrose, Printed circuit board design techniques for EMC compliance a handbook for designers, 2nd ed., IEEE Wiley-Interscience , New York, NY [etc] , 2000, engl., Bibl.Automatica Calculatoare( 2/ 0)

4. Bruce R. Archambeault , PCB design for real-world EMI control, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston Dordrecht London, 2002, engl., Bibl.Automatica Calculatoare( 1/ 0)

5. Dimitris Gizopoulos, Antonis Paschalis, Yervant Zorian, Embedded processor-based self-test, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston [etc.], 2004, engl., Bibl.Automatica Calculatoare( 1/ 0)

6. Richard Zurawski ed., Embedded systems handbook networked embedded systems, CRC Press Taylor & Francis Group, Boca Raton [etc.], 2009, engl., Bibl.Automatica Calculatoare( 2/ 0)

7. Thomas Braunl, Embedded robotics mobile robot design and applications with embedded systems, 2nd ed., Springer , Berlin Heidelberg, 2006, engl., Bibl.Electrotehnica/ETC( 1/ 0)

8. Electronic components datasheets (www.datasheetcatalog.com, etc.)

9. M. I. Montrose, "Printed circuit board design techniques for EMC compliance: a handbook for designers", 2nd ed., New York, NY, IEEE; Wiley - Interscience, 2000, ISBN 0780353765.

10. M. I. Montrose, "EMC and the printed circuit board: design, theory, and layout made simple", New York NY, IEEE, 1999, ISBN 078034703X.

11. D. Pitică, "Proiectare antiperturbativă în sisteme electronice", Ed. Albastra, Cluj-Napoca, 2000, ISBN 973944346X.

12. P. Svasta, N. D. Codreanu, C. Ionescu, et al., "Proiectarea asistată de calculator a modulelor electronice - mediul CADSTAR", Editura Tehnică, Bucureşti, 1998, ISBN 9733112267.

13. A. J. Schwab, "Compatibilitatea electromagnetică", trad.din lb.ger., Editura Tehnică, Bucureşti, 1996, ISBN 9733107565.

14. V. Cehan, Tecla Goraş, “Introducere în tehnologia subansamblelor electronice”, Ed. Matrix Rom, Bucureşti, 1997, ISBN 973-9254.

15. Dan Pitica, Mihaela Radu , Elemente de testare pentru sisteme electronice , Editura Albastra , Cluj-Napoca, 2001, ISBN - 973944363X.

16. M. Ciugudean, "Proiectarea unor circuite electronice", Ed. Facla, Timişoara, 1983. 17. Cataloage de componente, tipărite şi de pe Internet. 18. K. S. Kundert and O. Zinke, (2004), „The Designer's Guide to Verilog-AMS”, Kluwer Academic

Publishers, Boston, MA.

19. Rao R. Tummala, Steve Chapman, "Fundamentals of Microsystems Packaging", McGraw-Hill Professional, 2001, ISBN 0071371699, 9780071371698.

20. Charles A. Harper, "Electronic packaging and interconnection handbook", McGraw-Hill Professional, 2004, ISBN 0071430482, 9780071430487.

21. Rao Tummala, “System on Package (SOP)”, Ed. McGraw-Hill Professional, 2008, ISBN 0071459065 / 9780071459068.

22. Clyde F. Coombs, "Printed circuits handbook", sixth Edition, McGraw-Hill Professional, 2007, ISBN 0071467343, 9780071467346.

23. William J. Greig, "Integrated circuit packaging, assembly and interconnections", Springer, 2007, ISBN 0387281533, 9780387281537.

24. James E. Morris, Debendra Mallik, "Nanopackaging: Nanotechnologies and Electronics Packaging", Springer, 2007, ISBN 0387473254, 9780387473253.

25. James K. Wessel, "Handbook of advanced materials: enabling new designs", Wiley-IEEE, 2004, ISBN 0471454753, 9780471454755.

26. Mel M. Schwartz, "New materials, processes, and methods technology", CRC Press, 2006, ISBN 0849320534, 9780849320538.

27. D. Ionescu, "Tehnologie electronică - proiect", on-line (password protected): http://telecom.etc.tuiasi.ro/telecom/staff/dionescu/discipline%20predate/index.htm

Signatures: Date: January 25, 2011 Course titular: lecturer D. Ionescu, PhD.

Applications titular: lecturer D. Ionescu, PhD.

S y l l a b u s C o u r s e n a m e

TELEVISION SYSTEMS 1. Lecturer CLEJU IOAN 2. Course type: DM EDID405 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 7 2 2 C, 5k 28 28 56

4. Course objectives: Television systems course has the following objectives: - colorimetry elementar knowledge; - The study of black and white television system (image exploration, video complex signal components, the spectrum, TV channel structure); - Present used standard television systems knowledge (PAL, NTSC, SECAM); - Capturing TV devices study (CCD, MOS integrated circuits) and display image devices study (CRT, LCD, PDP); - Television chain system components (TV camera, TV receiver); structure and functionality; - Functional TV blocks (deflection systems, video amplifiers, remote control processors, teletext specified circuit); This course has the main objective to form a general technical culture for a specialist who will be able to design and maintain electronic equipments. 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: Television systems course is placed in the fifth semester thus, the students are already prepared to understand the basics in electronic field, so, also for the purpose matters. Could be mentioned: Materials and passive components, Electronic devices and circuits, Digital and analog integrated circuits, Signal, circuits and systems, etc. Considering this, the students can manage and understand the television system features. Based on the assimilated knowledge, the future engineers will be able to continue studying on master or doctoral program in more difficult specified electronic circuits. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills After this class graduation, the students will be able to known:

- the principle of distance television system transmission; - the main system television chain blocks (construction and functionality); - The television transmitted feature environments (cable, satellite, terrestrial); - The system television mainly used (PAL, SECAM, NTSC); - The display image functionality, limitations, and performances (CRT, LCD, PDP); - The receiver and TV camera block components structure and functionality; to be able to design some

similar blocks.

7. Teaching methods - free presentation, interactive, using white board for the fundamental subjects; - projector presentation; - particular analysis using references;

8. Evaluation procedure: Continuous evaluation

Laboratory activity : traditional 20% in final mark (Optional scientific essay can be elaborated, television subject, will be presented in a public meeting)

Test during the semester: 40% in final mark

(traditional; consists in 4 tasks : 2 exercises and 2 theoretical subjects) Final evaluation: written exam 40% in final mark (traditional; consists in 4 tasks : 1 exercise and 3 theoretical subjects)

- mini calculators are allowed; 9. Course content: a) Course I. Introduction 2 hours

Television chain structure (feature and functionality) Photometry notions Colorimetry notions II. Image television feature and parameters 1 hours III. Black and white TV system 4 hours

Exploration methods (progressive and interlaced) tandard parameters for 625lines/50 Hertz and 525lines/ 50Hertz Black and white video complex signal (inception, components, type, structure) Black and white video complex signal spectrum (frequency limits calculation, spectrum structure) TV channel RF structure.

IV. Color TV system television 8 hours

Color Compatibil Television systems NTSC system PAL system SECAM system

V. TV capturing and display images 4 hours

Video capturing electronic tubes Integrated video capturing devices Display image devices (CRT- tube, LCD and PDP)

VI. Deflection circuits 4 hours Horizontal deflection Voltage source obtained from horizontal deflection Vertical deflection Deflection synchronization Color TV addition corrections with deflection blocks

VII. Teletext system 2 hours VIII. Digital television principle systems 3 hours Total: 28 hours b) Applications

25. Black and white video complex signal (structure and components) 4 hours

26. Video electronic transducers 2 hours

27. CRT color tube; LCD, PDP display (construction and functionality) 2 hours

28. TV color receiver (construction and functionality) 4 hours

29. PAL Color decoder and Final Video amplifier; Sicroprocessor block 4 hours

30. Horizontal deflection circuits 2 hours

31. Vertical deflection circuits 2 hours

32. Remote control systems 2 hours

33. DVB systems 6 hours

Total: 28 hours 10. References:

1. BENOIT Herve – Digital Television – satellite, Cable, Terrestrial, IPTV, Mobile TV in the DVB Framework, third edition, Elesevier, 2008.

2. Michael ROBIN, Michel POULIN – Digital Television Fundamentals ; Sec. edition, Mc Graw-Hill 2000.

3. IBRAHIM K.F. – Newnes Guide to Television&Video Technology, Elsevier , 2007

Signatures:

Date: 20 october 2010 Conf.dr.ing. CLEJU Ioan

S y l l a b u s A d v a n c e d C o m m u n i c a t i o n s S y s t e m s

1. Lecturer: Prof.dr.ing. Nicolae Dumitru ALEXANDRU 2. Course type: DM EDIS406 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 8 3 1 2 E 42 14 28 84

4. Course objectives: The objective of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and understanding of advanced communications systems with special emphasis on spread spectrum communications, OFDM and MIMO systems. The students should be capable of choosing an appropriate coding technique for a given application, do a comparative analysis of the noise performance of different modulation systems, and design appropriate receiver structures to achieve given design goals. Students learn some of the most fundamental receiver architectures and schemes used in practice.

Several coding techniques are discussed to overcome transmission problems encountered due to multipath propagation. Methods of diversity can be extended to frequency, time and space diversity as well as to code diversity. Specific objectives are:

□ Acquiring knowledge about digital techniques used in advanced communications □ Learning the advanced coding/decoding and modulation/demodulation techniques □ Knowing the effects of perturbation that affect the mobile communication channels □ Presentation of methods and transmission techniques that are specific to advanced

communication systems, performance assessment and improvement

5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The discipline objectives are in agreement with the curriculum aiming at transmitting information and creating competence for the future professionals in the field of Electronics, Telecommunications and Information Technology. The discipline is integrated in the curriculum for “Telecommunications Systems and Technologies” and uses in a specific manner knowledge and methods that were introduced in the disciplines of Mathematics, Signals, circuits and systems, Introduction to Communications, Communication Systems and Digital Communications, and is properly placed in the chronology of the curriculum. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills 1. Cognitive

a. Knowledge and understanding: - to know the types and characteristics of digital techniques used in several types of advanced

communications; - to understand advanced digital communication techniques; - deep knowledge of theoretical, methodologic and practical developments used in

digital communication techniques and (spread spectrum systems, CDMA, OFDM, MIMO and combined MIMO-OFDM).

b. Explanation and interpretation - explaining the operation of various digital receiver circuits; - interpretation of the parameters of various coding/decoding and modulation/demodulation

circuits and of operation requirements; - explaining the importance of coding for boosting the performance.

2. Technical / professional: - elaboration of methodologies for experiments; - processing of experimental data that were obtained for various functional blocks; - defining analysis and simulation techniques using application software; - capacity of practical implementation for the acquired information; - capacity of conceiving block designs in the structure of communications systems and

implementing them. 3. Attitude – value

- satisfaction to analyze and simulate parts of an advanced digital communications system; - positive feedback to the requirement of using advanced digital communications techniques; - implication in scientific/development activities connected with design and construction of

advanced communications systems; - capacity of having an ethical behaviour;. - to be able to critically understand, to explain and interpret theoretical,

methodological and practical developments that are specific to digital communications systems and techniques;

- to have communication abilities specific to the discipline object; - to work in an international context.

7. Teaching methods Course: - procedural resources: In teaching the course one combines the oral exposé with videoprojector use and explanations, case studies, etc. In order evidence the theoretical notions and specific applications. One cretaes connexions with the content of other speciality disciplines and prevoisly introduced information within this discipline or with practical applications of the investigated problems. The course content is periodically updated with the newest communication techniques..

- methods – oral exposé, conversation, use of visual means, demonstration, synthesis of knowledge, case studies;

- academic procedures – academic course, explanation, exposé

- training procedures and organization - frontal, groups

- material resources: - PC, videoprojector, whiteboard

Applications: - procedural resources:

- methods – conversation, discussion, practical works, use of visual means, demonstration, synthesis of knowledge, case studies;

- academic procedures – explanation, academic exposé, learning by discovery, observation

- training procedures and organization – group, individual

8. Evaluation procedure:

Continuous Evaluation:: Activity in seminar / laboratory / project / practice

Weight in final grade: 20 % (It is evaluated as a function of attendance and pertinence of oral interventions, quality of effected work, progress, etc..)

Tests previous to final examination Weight in final grade: 10%

Essays, case studies and projects

Weight in final grade: 10 % Final Evaluation: (exam.)

Weight in final grade: 60 % Probes in exam evaluation:

1. Written ; tasks: 3 problems ; work conditions: 2 hours, open books; weight: 60 %; Traditional Students have acces to relations that are necessary to solve the problems.

2. Optional oral examination for extra credits: discussions with 3 relevant topics; work conditions: groups of 5 students. 9. Course content: a) Course

77. I. Synchronization 6 hours

Introduction, syncronization types, Baseband synchronization, Carrier and symbol synchronization, Closed-loop and open-loop synchronization, PSK and QAM synchronization, early-late gate synchronization.

78. II Improved Nyquist filters 6 hours Introduction, Examples of improved Nyquist filter, Filter optimization and calculation of probability of error.

79. III Spread spectrum systems 15 hours Pseudorandom sequences, delay calculation, advanced DLL tracking circuits, code synchronization, Chirp systems

80. IV OFDM Synchronization 6 hours V MIMO Systems 9 hours

Layered space-time codes, LST architectures, differential space-time modulation, limits of MIMO systems.

Total: 42 hours b) Applications

LABORATORY (28 hours)

81. 1. Baseband synchronization (line codes) 4 hours 82. Matlab - simulink 83. 2. PSK and QPSK carrier synchronization 4 hours 84. Matlab - simulink 85. 3. Improved Nyquist filters. Calculation of error probability when sampling with a

fixed time offset 4 hours 86. Mathematica 87. 4. Generation of maximal length sequences with a specified delay 4 hours 88. Matlab - simulink 89. 5. Simulation of several DLL circuits 4 hours 90. 6. Coarse synchronization (code acquisition) in spread spectrum systems 4 hours 91. Matlab – simulink 92. 7. Simulation of a MIMO system using layered space-time codes 4 hours 93. Matlab – simulink 94.

SEMINARY (14 hours) 95. 1. Pseudorandom binary sequences 2 hours 96. 2. QAM synchronization 2 hours 97. 3. Improved Nyquist filters 2 hours

98. 4.Generation of maximal length sequences with specified delay 2 hours

99. 5. CDMA signals 2 hours 100. 6

.Gold codes 2 hours

101. 7. Block space-time codes 2 hours

Total 28 hours 10. References:

[1] Proakis J. G., Salehi M., “Communication Systems Engineering”, Second Edition, Prentice Hall, 2002.

[2] Glover I. A., Grant P. M., “Digital Communications” – book & solutions manual, 1st Edition, Prentice Hall, 2000.

[3] Mengali, U., D’Andrea, A.N., “Synchronization Techniques for Digital Receivers”, Plenum Press,1997

[4] Meyr H., Moeneclaey M., Fechtel St. A., “Digital Communication Receivers: Synchronization, Channel Estimation, and Signal Processing”, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1998

[5] Proakis J. G., “Digital Communications”, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall, 1995. [6] Simon M. K., Alouini M.-S., “Digital Communication over Fading Channels: A Unified Approach to

Performance Analysis”, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2000. [7] Peterson, R.L., Ziemer, R.E., Borth, D.E., “Introduction to Spread Spectrum Communications”,

Prentice Hall, 1995. [8] Lee, J.S., Miller, L.E., “CDMA Systems Engineering Handbook”, Artech House, 1998 [9] Goldsmith Andrea, “Wireless Communications”, Stanford University,

http://www.g2tech.110mb.com/downloads/ece/Wireless%20Communications%20Andrea%20Goldsmith,%20Stanford%20University.pdf

[10] Alexandru N.D., Graur, A., „Sisteme Spread Spectrum”. MEDIAMIRA, Cluj,. 2005 [11] Alexandru N.D., „Radiocomunicaţii digitale”, vol.II, Comunicaţii digitale, STEF, Iasi, 2006

Signatures:

Date: January 19, 2011 Lecturer Nicolae Dumitru Alexandru Instructor (s) Felix Diaconu

S y l l a b u s

C o m m u n i c a t i o n S k i l l s 1. Lecturer : Conf.dr.ing. Adrian Brezulianu 2. Course type: DM EDIC407 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 8 1 1 Colloquy 14 14 28

4. Course objectives: Verbal communication plays a crucial role both in terms of bargaining segment is occupied and in terms of content. Verbal communication allows one logical game of questions and answers in an ongoing flexible, spontaneous, something that is not possible when negotiations take place writing or by other techniques. The language in negotiation or negotiation involves primarily a transition better communication between partners. The art of speaking is acquired through the accumulation of knowledge and continuity to eliminate uncertainty, disordered speech, lack of expressiveness in speech balance. Specific objectives are:

□ Assimilation of knowledge and skills in the field of oral communication, written and nonverbal, to create an image of personal qualities;

□ Ways of representing the perspective of personal potential in entrepreneurial activitie □ Assimilation of business relationships and ethical relationships with peers, the interpersonal

relationships at work; □ Analysis of practical applications in entrepreneurship, interview techniques and negotiation

techniques 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum: The discipline objectives are in agreement with the curriculum aiming at transmitting information and creating competence for the future professionals in the field of Electronics, Telecommunications and Information Technology. The discipline is integrated in the curriculum for “Telecommunications Systems and Technologies” and uses in a specific manner knowledge and methods that were introduced in the disciplines Romanian language, Foreign languages and Economics and Marketing and is properly placed in the chronology of the curriculum. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills 1. Cognitive

a. Knowledge and understanding: - to know the types and characteristics of various communications types (verbal and nonverbal); - to understand the principles of verbal and nonverbal communications; b. Explanation and interpretation - Explain the impact of language in interpersonal relationships at work; - The impact of communication about interview techniques; - The impact on communication about negotiation techniques;

2. Tehnical / professional:

- Develop a negotiating strategy - Develop a strategy in an interview in which the student is interviewed - Develop a strategy in an interview in which the student is the interviewer

3. Attitude – value - satisfaction to analyze a a strategy in an interview or negotiation; - positive feedback to the requirement of using interview / negotiation communications

techniques; - capacity of having an ethical behaviour;. - to be able to critically understand, to explain and interpret communication techniques; - to have communication abilities specific to the discipline object;

7. Teaching methods Course: - procedural resources: In teaching the course one combines the oral exposé with videoprojector use and explanations, case studies, etc. In order evidence the theoretical notions and specific applications. One cretaes connexions with the content of other speciality disciplines and prevoisly introduced information within this discipline or with practical applications of the investigated problems. The course content is periodically updated with the newest communication techniques..

- methods – oral exposé, conversation, use of visual means, demonstration, synthesis of knowledge, case studies;

- academic procedures – academic course, explanation, exposé

- training procedures and organization - frontal, groups

- material resources: - PC, videoprojector, whiteboard

Applications: - procedural resources:

- methods – conversation, discussion, practical works, use of visual means, demonstration, synthesis of knowledge, case studies;

- academic procedures – explanation, academic exposé, learning by discovery, observation

- training procedures and organization – group, individual

8. Evaluation procedure:

Continuous Evaluation:: Essays, case studies and projects

Weight in final grade: 20 % Final Evaluation: (colloquy.)

Weight in final grade: 75 % 9. Course content: A) COURSE (14 hours)

101.1. 1. Fundamentals of interpersonal relationships 2 hours 101.2. Theoretical substantiation of the concept of communication, communication process structure,

process steps and mechanisms of communication, communication roles, Personality differences 101.3. 2. Relationships oral and nonverbal communication 2

hours 101.4. Types of communication, oral communication styles, Communications networks 101.5. 3. Relationships of nonverbal communication 2 hours

101.6. Physical appearance, Gestures, Mimics, Facial expressions, How to look, Smile, The language of silence, Environment language, Clothing 4. Interpersonal relations at work 2 hours

101.7. Obstacles arising from subordinates, managers generated obstacles, communication styles 101.8. 5. Applications on interview techniques 2

hours 101.9. Communication styles, nonverbal communication, Communication obstacles,

101.10. 6. Applications of negotiation techniques

2 hours 101.11. Negotiating techniques, Time distortion technique, Principle of reciprocity, Commitment and

consistency principle, Principle of conferral 101.12. 7. Business relationships. Enterprise

2 hours 101.13. Communication obstacles, Communications networks, active listening, crisis and conflict,

conflict management approach, Stress Total: 14 hours

B) SEMINAR (14 hours) 101.14. 1. Presentation at interview

7 hours 2. Initiating and negotiating a commercial contract 7 hours

Total 14 hours 10. References: [1] Cole G. A., Personnel Management, DP Publication Ltd, Aldine Place, London, 1993 [2] Hiltrop J., Udall S., The Essence of Manegement. The Essence of Negociation. Prentice Hall International UK Ltd, 1995 [3] Ludlon R., Panton F., The Essence of Manegement. The Essence of effective communication. Prentice Hall International UK Ltd, 1992 [4] Ritt A., Comunicare, Univ. Tibiscus, Timisoara, 1998 [5] Stanton N., Communication. The Macmillan Press Limited, 1995 [6] Baldridge L., Codul manierelor în afaceri, A.S.E., World Entreprises Sterling Lord Literistic, Inc. New York 100 10, USA, 1994

Signatures:

Date: January, 2011 Conf. Dr. Ing. Adrian Brezulianu

S Y L L A B U S MICROWAVE DEVICES AND CIRCUITS FOR WIRELESS COMUNICATION

1. Lecturer: Professor Irinel CASIAN-BOTEZ 2. Course type: DM EDIS408 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 8 3 2 E 42 28 70

4. Course objectives: Familiarizing students with the design principles in the microwave: Microwave specific circuit parameters, microwave network analisys, filters, impedance matching circuits, amplifiers, oscillators, mixers.5. Consistency between discipline and curriculum goals: 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical and professional skills

• Ability to design microwave circuits • Ablity to analyse a curcuits with transmission line • Ability to identify parasitic elements

7. Teaching methods:

Teaching will be done using slides and computer simulations. 8. Evaluation procedure

(La fiecare formă de evaluare se precizează tipul: tradiţional, cu calculatorul, mixt.)

Evaluarea continuă: Activitatea la seminar / laborator / proiect / practică

Share in final grade: 15%

(Se evaluează în funcţie de frecvenţa şi pertinenţa intervenţiilor orale, calitatea lucrărilor efectuate, consemnarea sistematică a informaţiilor semnificative generate de student în grupul de aplicaţie.)

Testele pe parcurs

Share in final grade: 0%

(Se utilizează pentru evaluarea pe parcursul semestrului a cunoştinţelor, teoretice şi / sau practice acumulate la orele de curs şi de aplicaţii.)

Lucrări de specialitate

Share in final grade: 15%

(Se utilizează pentru evaluarea competenţelor generale şi specifice pe baza unor lucrări elaborate de student precum: rezumate, sinteze ştiinţifice, eseuri tematice, referate, proiecte, rapoarte de activitate practică sau de cercetare, studii de caz, recenzii etc.)

Evaluarea finală: (Se precizează: examen sau colocviu.)

Exam, Share in final grade: 70% Proba(ele): problems

(Se menţionează fiecare probă şi se precizează:

a) categoria de sarcini (rezolvare de probleme); b) condiţiile de lucru (scris, 2 ore, orice material bibliografic autorizat) şi c) ponderea în procente a fiecărei probe în nota examenului.) 20%

9. Course content: a) Lecture notes Introduction ....................................................................................................................................................3h

a) Impedance Matching

......................................................................................................................................3h

1.1.Binomial Multisection Matching Transformers. 1.2.Chebyshev Multisection Matching Transformers 1.3 The Bode-Fano Criterion b) Cuploare direcţionale

.....................................................................................................................................6h

c) 2.1. The Quadrature Hybrid

d) 2.2. Coupled Line Directional Couplers

e) 2.3. The Lange Coupler

f) 2.4. The ring Hybrid

g) Power Dividers

................................................................................................................................................3h

h) 3.1. The T-Junction Power Divider

i) 3.2. The Wilkinson Power Divider

j) Filtre de microunde

........................................................................................................................................6h

k) 4.1. Introduction

l) 4.2. Filter Design by the Insertion Loss Method

m) 4.2.1. Characterization by Power Loss ratio

4.2.2 Maximally Flat Low-Pass Filter Prototype 4.2.3 Equal-Ripple Low-Pass Filter Prototype

n) 4.3. Filter Transformations

o) 4.3.1. Impedance and Frequency Scaling

p) 4.3.2. Bandpass and Bandstop Transformations

q) 4.4. Filter Implementation

r) 4.4.1. Richard’s Transformation.

s) 4.4.2. Kuroda’s Identities

4.4.3 Impedance and Admittance Inverters t) 4.5. Stepped-Impedance Low-Pass Filters

u) 4.6. Coupled Line Filters

v) Microwave Amplifier Design

...................................................................................................................... 12h

w) 5.1. Definitions of Two-Port Power Gains

x) 5.2. Stability

y) 5.3. Noise Factor

z) 5.4. Single-Stage Tranzistor Amplifier Design

aa) 5.4.1. Design for Maximum Gain (Conjugate Matching)

bb) 5.4.2. Constant Gain Circles and Design for Specified Gain

cc) 5.4.3. Low-Noise Amplifier Design

dd) 5.5. Broadband Tranzistor Amplifier Design

ee) Oscillators

Design...........................................................................................................................................3h

ff) 6.1. General Analysis

gg) 6.2. Exemple

Mixers ..............................................................................................................................................................6h 7.1 Mixer Characteristics 7.2 Balanced Mixer 7.3 Image Reject Mixer Total 42 h b) Laboratory / Project Project: 1 Transistor Microawave Amplifier Design using ADS

1. Circuit Simulation Fundamentals 2. DC Simulation and Circuit Modeling 3. AC Simulation 4. S-parameter Simulation and Optimization 5. Amplifier Design

Total _28h 10. Selective references: 1. David M. Pozar, :Microwave Engineering”, John Wiley & Sons, 2005. 2. Advanced Design System, Student’s Course Warkbook. . Semnături: Data: 09.03.2011 Titular curs: Irinel CASIAN-BOTEZ

Titular aplicaţii: Radu DAMIAN

S y l l a b u s

ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY

1. Lecturer: Ionescu Daniela 2. Course type: DM EDOD409 3. Course structure:

Semester No. hours/week No. hours/semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 8 3 1 1 Exam 28 14 14 56

4. Course objectives: The course is intended to offer basic knowledge of electromagnetic compatibility, of parasitical couplings (capacitive, inductive, conductive and through electromagnetic field) as well as about methods for the protection of equipment against noise. The course will provide students with the necessary skills to understand how perturbations penetrate equipment and how the latter can be protected. 5. Consistency of discipline and curriculum goals:

The course objectives are consistent with the objectives of the curriculum for the training of specialists in the field of telecommunications. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical and professional skills Cognitive skills:

The course enables the students to understand the problems of electromagnetic compatibility and its related aspects: perturbation generation, means of penetration and effects on cirsuits and systems. The students will study low frequency and high frequency parasitical couplings as well as parasitical couplings in transmission lines. They will also find out about aspects related to the mass approach (?) and circuits supplying. For each type of coupling the course describes protection procedures and procedures for decreasing the effects of perturbations.

General skills: By the end of the course, the students will be able to show understanding of the basic aspects of electromagnetic compatibility: production, propagation si effects of perturbations as well as of the principles of decreasing these effects both from a physical, qualitative and a mathematical, quantitative perspective. The students will be able to approach practical EMC aspects in real situations. Specific skills: The students will be able to use the EMC principles to understand phenomena such as the perturbation of circuits and equipment functioning, means of penetration and the effects on electronic systems. The students will be able to design circuits and parts (?) which are immune (?) to perturbations. They will be able to design PCB(?) taking into account the principles of mass treatment and circuit supplying.

7. Teaching methods: Teaching: Oral presentation using the video-projector and case discussions. Laboratories: Completion of the computer laboratory papers and carrying out the practical laboratory subjects. Discussions based on the laboratory papers. Tracking and guidance to perform laboratory work. Scoring of the results.

The examination requirements: knowledge of course content and application subjects, oral and written examination of the students. 8. Evaluation procedure

Continuous evaluation: Activity in the seminar / laboratory / project / practice

Share of final grade: 50 %

Tests during the semester Share of final grade: 10 %

Specialty papers:

Share of final grade: 10 %

Final evaluation: Exam Share of final grade: 50 %

Evaluations: 1. Written evaluation – problems 50 %;

2. Oral evaluation, verification of theoretical knowledge 50 %; 9. Course content: a) Course: Chapter 1. Introductin 1.1. Stages in technological and constructive designing of the electronic equipment. 1.2. Influence of the electromagnetic compatibility aspects on the technological and constructive solutions. 1.3. Concepts and definitions. 1.4. Parasitical coupling modeling. Classifications. 1.5. Perturbation sources. 1.6. Standards and settlements. Chapter 2. LF parasitical couplings. 2.1. Capacitive parasitical coupling. 2.2. Shield effect on capacitive coupling. 2.3. Ground connecting rules of the electrical shields. 2.4. Inductive parasitical coupling. 2.5. Magnetic coupling at a coaxial cable between shield and his inner conductor. 2.6. Shielding cables protection in magnetic fields. 2.7. Comparison between different types of cables. 2.8. Parasitic coupling by common ground impedance. 2.9. Ground connection of the shield for the transducer – amplifier cable. 2.10. Parasitic coupling by ground loop. 2.11. Electrical ground at HF. 2.12. Balancing effect on common mode perturbations. 2.13. Differential amplifiers using. 2.14. Active shield.

2.15. Guarding of the electronic equipment. Chapter 3. Parasitic coupling by radiation. Shields. 3.1. The EM field structure. Elementary antennas. 3.2. The skin effect. Equations of the waves propagation. 3.3. The shield by two plane-parallel plates. 3.4. The wave impedance. The impedance of the medium. 3.5. Reflected waves. Transmitted waves. 3.6. Multiple reflections effect inside the shield. 3.7. Losses by reflection. Losses by absorption. 3.8. Multilayered shields. 3.9. Technological problems in shields construction. 3.10. Materials for shields. Chapter 4. Perturbations leaded through supplying paths. 4.1. Perturbations generated by contacts. Contacts protection. 4.2. Perturbations generated by static switches. 4.3. Supplies in d.c. 4.3.1. Characteristics of the supplying bus. 4.3.2. Coupling by common impedance in the case of d.c. supply. 4.3.3. Decoupling condensers calculation. 4.4. Supplies in a.c. 4.4.1. The a.c. network characteristics. 4.4.2. The network filters calculation. 4.4.3. Network conditioning. Protections. Chapter 5. Noises 5.1. Introduction 5.1.1. Theorem of Parseval. Energy spectral density. 5.1.2. Power spectral density. 5.2. Noise characterization. 5.2.1. Static mediums. 5.2.2. Power spectral density of the noise. 5.2.3. Noise transmission through linear systems. Noise band. 5.3. Noises of the electronic devices. 5.3.1. Generalities. 5.3.2. Thermal noise. 5.3.3. Others intrinsic noises, generated in electronic devices. 5.3.3.1. The shot noise. 5.3.3.2. The flicker noise. 5.3.3.3. The popcorn noise. 5.4. The classical theory of the noise in the two-ports systems. 5.4.1. Calculation of the amplifier noise. 5.4.2. Noise factor (F). Noise figure (NF). 5.4.3. The signal-noise report. 5.4.4. The operational noise factor. Total lecture hours: 28 hours b) Lab 1. Work protection for electronic laboratory. 2. Study of the inductive parasitical coupling, at LF. 3. Study of the capacitive parasitical coupling, at LF. 4. Interconnections between digital circuits. Reflections on the transmission lines. 5. Parasitical couplings at HF. Shielding

6. Electrical ground considering in electronic equipment. 7. Supplies in d.c. Decoupling. 8. Supplies in a.c. The network filter. 9. Technological aspects in construction of electronic equipment.

Total laboratories hours: 28 hours

c) Project Proiectarea alimentării unui circuit cu componente analogice şi digitale: decuplarea alimentărilor, tratarea masei, calculul conductoarelor pentru evitarea reflexiilor în linii

Total project hours: 28 hours

10. Selective references: CLAYTON R. PAUL – “Introduction to Electromagnetic Compatibility” JOHN WILEY & SONS, 2006, ISBN-13: 978-0-471-75500-5 WESTON, DAVID A., “Electromagnetic compatability : principles and applications”, Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1991, ISBN 0-8247-8507-X MORRISON RALPH - "Grounding and Shielding Techniques in Instrumentation", John Wiley & Sons, 1977. OTT HENRY - "Noise Reduction Techniques In Electronic Systems", John Wiley & Sons, 1976. Kodali, V. Prasad, “ENGINEERING ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY: PRINCIPLES, MEASUREMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY”, INNN Press, 1996, ISBN 0-7803-1117-5 WHITE DONALD - EMC Handbook, vol.III. Don White Consultants Inc., Maryland, 1972. V.MANASSEWITSCH - "Frequency Synthesizers. Theory and Design" cap.3, John Wiley & Sons, 1976 B. KEISER - "Principles of Electromagnetic Compatibility". London: Artech House, 1988. 01.12.2010 Professor Daniela Ionescu, PhD

S y l l a b u s

C o u r s e n a m e M a n a g e m e n t 1. Lecturer : Associate professor Cristiana ISTRATE, PhD2. Course type: DI, DC 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 8 2 1 - - C 28 14 - - 42

4. Course objectives: The course is structured in two parts: one with a truely theoratical nature (regarding the fundamental and methodological aspects of management) and the second one being developed on a management simulation software-like structure that creates a competitive environment – involving a business market – for two to eight companies that produce and sell the same product. The data generated by the sofware program offers the participants the opportunity to pratice reading and interprinting financial reports and the competiton motivates them to identify the factors that influence the production, marketing and financial decisions of a company in order to relate them to the principals of concurational economy. The goal of the training is concentrated in the following objectives: - studying the effects of business decisions; - identifying the links and relations existent within the departaments of a company; - involvement in training exercises regarding decision-making aspects in a competitive environment; - applying technological, economical and managerial knowledge; - development of team-work and communication abilities; - elaboration of a strategy that will facilitate the achievement of the company’s goals, the implementation and follow-up of its effects in time; - development of an ethical attitude in the business environment. 5. Correlation between discipline objectives and curriculum:

The subject’s objectives are established so that they contribute to the training of the specialists who will be working in a competitive environment by ensuring the development of the necessary competences in order for them to be able to operate with specific methods and adequate management indicators. The students will also have the opportunity to practice their abilities of maximizing the value of an economical organization and of ensuring the competitiveness through the price of the produced/ commercialized products. The objectives of the subject are reached by the use of previously gained knowledge (such as the one from subjects EDIS 304, EDIC 305 and EDOS 312) and by sustaining the specific goals of subjects that will be studied in the future (such as EDIC 407, EDID 412).

The objectives outlined above correspond to the requirements of the curriculum and to its main aim – that of training future specialists in the field of electronics and telecommunications, able to take part in social and professional interactions in international contexts.

6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical or professional skills After having covered and acquired the contents of this course, the students will be able to: - know and use an adequate managerial vocabulary; - create the price policy of a company involved in a competitive environment; - estimate the costs of an effective production; - appreciate the importance of a consequent marketing policy; - understand the necessity of investing in research-development activities; - create - on the basis of relevant economical and financial indicators – global analysis of the advantageousness and profitability of a company; - understand the relations between the different functions of a company; - work in a team. 7. Teaching methods Specific procedures • Course Interactive course for the analysis and evaluation of the student impact (posted on the AeL Enterprise e-learning platform), Power Point prezentations, use of a videprojector.

Simulation of managerial activities through a Business Game in order to facilitate the „learning-by-doing” training method (using an especially designed software program). • Seminars Team-work – for mastering the received information and developing relationship-building abilities in a team. Discussions, debates, theme-oriented analysis and home assignment presentation for assessing and evaluating the learning process. General procedures - the continous update of the contents of the course and themes of the seminars; - the continous improvement of the teacher-student cooperation based on the assimilation of new methods, techniques and procedures in the field of management simulation programs and on the features of a specific study-group

8. Evaluation procedure:

Continous evaluation with an important emphasis of the student’s activity during the semester:

Active participation in seminars/ project Final grade share: 35%

The active participation will be traditionally evaluated, taking into consideration the frequency and pertinence of interventions and the sistematic assessment of the eloquent ideas generated by the student in his work-group, as well as class attendance.

Throughtout the semester tests Final grade share: 0 No schedualed tests are programmed thoroughout the course.

Specialty assessments

Final grade share: 35% The business plan is evaluated in a complex way (written document – traditional evaluation, actual presentation of the project – oral presentation)

Final evaluation: Collocutional examination (Written exam) Final grade share: 30 % Written exam assays: 1. Testing of theoretical knowledge - 50%: a) assessment categories – multiple choice test; b) testing rules: no information sources will be available for the completion of the task; the evaluation is traditional; c) written exam final grade share. 2. Testing the ability of applying specific management methods – 50%: a) assessment categories – practical exercise; b) testing rules: no information sources will be available for the completion of the task; the evaluation is traditional; c) written exam final grade share. 9. Course content: Course

No. Name of chapter Hours no.

PART 1 1. Sistemic approach of business in a compectitive environment.

Managerial control and feedback. 2

2. Introduction in the management of the organizations. The functions of management.

3

3. Organizational culture and business ethics. 2 4. The mission, objectives and strategies of an organization. 2

5. Human resources management. 2 6. Communication. 2 7. Project management. 3

PART 2: BUSINESS GAME 8. hh) Production cost. Foundation of the price decision. 2

9. Operational management. Foundation of the production decision. 2 10. ii) Foundation of the marketing decision. 2

11. Foundation of the investment decision. 2 12. Foundation of the research-developement decision. 2 13. Foundation of decision in a crisis situation. 2

2) TOTAL 28

Seminar

Elaboration and presentation of a business plan (groups of 3 – 5 students)

No. Name of theme Hours

no. 1. Brief description of the company. 2 2. Presenatation of products and/or offered services. 2 3. Comapany leadership. 2 4. Market analysis.Competitive strategy of the company. 2

5. Operational plan. 2 6. Financial plan. 2 7. Business plan presentation. 2

3) TOTAL 14

10. References: 1. Cristiana ISTRATE, 2009, Suport curs Management platformă e-learning AeL Entreprise 2. Atwood, Christee GABOUR, 2009, Knowledge Management Basics, Harward University 3. Sandra GURVIS, Barbara MAY, 2007, Management Basics: A practical Guide for Managers, Harward University4. David REES, Christine PORTER, 2005, Arta managementului - Skills of management , Editura Tehnică, Bucureşti 5. Panaite NICA, Aurelian EFTIMESCU, 2004, Management concepte şi aplicaţii, Editura Sedcom Libris, Iaşi Signature: Date: Lecturer (name and surname) December 25, 2010 Associate Professor Cristiana ISTRATE, PhD

SYLLABUS

DIGITAL AUDIO-VIDEO SYSTEMS

1. Lecturer: Dan Dorin Cepareanu, PhD 2. Course type:DS, DE EDOS411A 3. Course structure:

No. hours/week No. hours/semester Semester C S L P

Final examinationC S L P

Total

7 2 - 2 - C 28 - 28 - 56 4. Course objectives:

This course introduces students to : - the audio video recording and playback systems - the analysis and design of specific diagrams - the circuits used by these equipments

5. Teaching methods and evaluation procedure:

Course : Interactive whiteboard and slides presentation Laboratory : Presentation of the equipments, disasemblings and parameter

measurements, quizz. Evaluation: periodical evaluation, final evaluation

6. Course content:

a) Course: 1. Recording of sound on magnetic tape. -the principle of magnetic recording, design of magnetic head, tape types, parameters ,distortions ,noise, electrical diagram, noise reduction systems. 2. Analogical recording of video signals on magnetic tape -The colour video complex signal peculiarities, frequency spectrum -Recording characteristic of the video head , design -Helcoid recording , electrical transformation of video components for recording ,spectral transposing of luminace and crominance -Specific correction circuits and signal improving methods -Different formats of video recording (VHS, video 8 mm, Betacam, M format) -Image improving techniques -Capstan and video drum servo mechanisms 3. Digital recording of video signals -sampling and hold A/D and D/A video conversion -digital transmitting rate for video signal, digital processing, standards (4:2:2, 2:1:1) 4. Video cameras 5. Digital audio tape recorder -Digital conversion of analogical audio signal, PASC processing, ETM coding, CIRC coding, DAT and DCC systems -Digital signal processing, error correction -Multichannel audio head design 6. Sound recording on CD -Digital processing of analogical signal EFM and CIRC coding -CD design, principle of optical reading -Electrical diagrams, other methods of magneto-optical recording

7. Transmission of audio – video analogical and /or digital signals by cable (CATv). 8. CATV networks components, amplifiers, splitters, digital and analogical modulators, legal frame of CATv networks. 9. Data transmission (internet) by CATv. TOTAL: 42 h Applications:

1. Design of video drum head and servo engine 2. Mechanical component of a video recorder 3. Electrical testing for video players 4. JVC of video camera 5. Mechanical design of the CD optical system 6. Electrical testing for laser diode and photo-detectors 7. Design of CATv amplifier 8. Measurements of CATv networks 9. CATv modulators, design and mesuraments

TOTAL :14 h Project

1. Audio amplifier 2. Mixer, design and project 3. CD project 4. Multichannel distribution system 5. Direct and forward CATv amplifier

TOTAL :14h 7.References

1. Glen M. Ballou, Handbook for sound engineers, 3rd ed., Amsterdam [etc. ] Elsevier Focal 2005, ISBN 0240807588

2. Robin, Michael Digital television fundamentals design and installations of video and audio systems New York, NY [etc] McGraw-Hill 2000, ISBN 0071355812

3. C. Poşa - Electroacustică -- Rotaprint U.T. Gh. Asachi, Iaşi, 1995. 4. C. Poşa - Difuzoare şi incinte acustice -- Editura "Gh. Asachi" Iaşi , 1993. 5. A. Necşulea - Electroacustica în sonorizare -- Ed. Tehnică, 1963. 6. M. Rossi - Electroacoustique -- PPR Lausanne, 1986. 7. Inregistrarea şi redarea sunetului C. Poşa, Ş. Naicu, G.R. Munteanu –editura

ALL 1998 8. Videocasetofoane – înregistrarea şi redarea magnetică a imaginii şi sunetului D.

Cepăreanu, Ş. Naicu – editura ALL 1999 9. Videocasetofoane, M. Rădoi, R. Muntranu, M. Băşoiu – Editura Tehnica Bucureşti

1987 10. Videorecordere VHS, S-VHS, Digitale, C. Teodorescu - Ed. Video-Service 1991 11. DDC Casetofoane digitale, M. Băşoiu Ed. Tehnică 1998 12. Compact Disc, Mu. Băşoiu, M. Băşoiu, E. Ştefan – Ed. Teora 1995 13. Televiziune digitală, Gh. I. Mitrofan Ed. Academiei RSR Buc. 1986

Signatures:

Date: 20.01.2011 Lecturer Dan Dorin Cepăreanu, PhD

S Y L L A B U S MEDICAL ELECTRONICS AND INFORMATICS

1. Taught by: Prof. dr. Horia-Nicolai Teodorescu, mc AR Dr. Horia-Nicolai Teodorescu, MC

2. Course type: DE EDOS411B

3. Course Structure:

Hours per week Hours per semester Semester

C S L P

Final evaluation

form C S L P Total 7 2 2 C 28 28 56

4. Course objectives: Introducing the deepening and systematization of knowledge on some devices and circuits used in medical

equipment, especially pre-amplifiers used for biological signal processing (instrumentation amplifiers / insulation, types of noise, interference, etc..) Tube X, scintillation, ultrasonic transducers etc..

Introducing the deepening and systematization of knowledge about some biological signal processing methods / bioelectric.

Familiarizing students with the principles of operation, handling and interpretation of data from some equipment used in medicine for diagnosis and treatment: electrocardiograph, pacemaker, defibrillator, electromyography, electroencephalography, ultrasound, computerized tomography, scintigraphy, etc..

5. Consistency between discipline and curriculum goals: Course objectives fully correspond with the specific curriculum, these goals are in teaching, learning and systematization of basic and applied knowledge in a field of Applied Electronics.

6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive skills, technical profesionale

The learning outcomes will be reflected in the expansion and deepening of the horizon of knowledge and understanding of students, flexible thinking, creativity and capacity for joint development of complex knowledge, interdisciplinary - medical equipment, noise calculation, digital signal processing, statistical evidence, physiology ( medicine), computer science, programming.

7. Procedures used in the teaching discipline:

It will focus on interactive teaching discipline, developing dialogue with students. It will combine traditional methods with those based on the use of audio-visual, computer and the Internet. The structure of the discipline has in mind that regardless of specialization courses graduated license, students need updating and deepening basic knowledge of a field of maximum interest in the synthesis of complex digital systems. It is intended especially to emphasize and exemplify their usefulness in practice. It will consider a more flexible adaptation of teaching the subjects in the preparation and interest of students (a student-centered approach). Will be widely used references in IEEE journals and collections of other references found in mainstream (ISI), thus ensuring uptake of relevant knowledge and cutting edge

Teaching Procedures: Exposure, conversation, example, demonstration applications, exercises, solved problems, micro-projects.

8. Evaluation System: Continuous assessment:

Laboratory Activity Share of final grade: _50_%

(To evaluate the frequency and relevance of oral interventions, quality of work performed, systematic recording significant information generated by student group application.)

a) the category of tasks: knowledge test questions closed / open, thematic development, problem solving, case presentation, etc.);

b) working conditions - means available to the student during the test: any material taught in class

Microproject

Share of final grade: _15% _

(It used to put into practice the theoretical knowledge and / or practical experience in classes and applications and the acquisition of design skills.)

Lab and course tests Share of final grade: _20_%

(Use for assessment during the semester of knowledge, theoretical and / or practical experience in classes and applications.)

Specialty papers

Share of final grade: _15_%

(It used to assess general and specific skills based on work developed by the student such as summaries, scientific summaries, thematic essays, papers, projects, reports or research practice, case studies, reviews, etc..)

Final evaluation: (Enter: exam or seminar.)

Share in final score: 50% exam (Samples assessment by examination is focused on thematic development, problem solving, demonstration, case presentation) 9. Course Content:

c) Course (Depending on the time available and the response capacity and prior knowledge of the audience, the owner reserves the right to reduce or add some of the topics taught.)

• Introducing the deepening and systematization of knowledge about the image dsemnalele, semnlae processing applications in 2D and medical electronics

• Presentation elementary signal processing methods in medical imaging: linear filters (ARMA model) - in particular weighted average filter, nonlinear filter that - median filter. Applications on 1D signals and 2D images cudiscutarea specific items.

• Presentation of amplifiers used in biological signal processing (AI - instrumentation amplifier), methods to improve the common mode of rejection in AI, methods of limiting the frequency band AI, the AI techniques to improve performance by reducing noise in the preamplifier .

• Noise study of biological signal amplification circuit: thermal noise, excessive noise, the noise of the operational amplifiers (OA), the noise model of OA in biological signal band of interest, the factor of noise (signal to noise ratio of AO ) etc..

• Disturbances in the processing of biological signals: voltages termoelectromotoare, biological pest generators, generators artificial parasites triboelectrice tension, cable tension generated by moving magnetic field, voltages generated by thermal drift, caused by mains voltage, voltage amplifiers electrochemical entry.

• Electrodes for collecting biological signals: surface electrodes, needle electrodes, microelectrodes, electrode models for electric

• Presentation 1D signal processing methods in medicine: discrete linear filters (ARMA model), nonlinear filters - Median filter, statistical filters, polynomial filters (since the time available and the responsiveness of the audience).

• Elements of electrocardiography: electrical functioning of the heart, ECG signal collection methods, the principle diagram of the electrocardiograph ECG, cardiac defibrillator presentation of other medical equipment, ie pacemakers.

• Elements of electroencephalography - EEG: brain functioning in terms of power, methods for collecting signal EEG, electroencephalography, operating characteristics, evoked potentials, specific methods for filtering the EEG signals.

• Introduction to medical imaging: comparison ultrasound, radiography, thermography, etc. tomographic techniques.

• Elements of ultrasound: human body reaction to ultrasound, ultrasound equations of principle, the choice of parameters used in ultrasound ultrasonic signal, block diagram of ultrasound, mechanical scanning, electronic sweep (sectoral and linear) ultrasound, electronic focusing ultrasound.

• Radiography elements: physical principles of radiation generation X (the equations of principle), X tube presentation medium and high power, the image intensifiers.

• Scan elements: principles of operation of the scanning, presentation principle scintilatorului

• Elements computed tomography magnetic resonance imaging - MRI: physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance, presenting equations and schematic diagram of the CT scan, MRI parameters used in the detection, construction types MRI tomography, tomographic image reconstruction algorithms for MRI.

Total course hours 42 hrs

b) Applications

• # 1 International rules, EU and national rules on protection of patient and medical electronic equipment design and use. Fire prevention measures in laboratories. General rules and rules of laboratory safety.

• #2 EXCEL implementation of mediation and filters median filters of various orders to remove noise from biological signals. Making FTJ, FTS, MSDS, etc.. (Depending on students' knowledge, filters can be done in C or another language)

• # 3 Image formats. Making a TrueColor images in 256 shades of gray image. Contrast processing. Determination histogram. Flatten (equalization) histogram.

• # 4 elementary processing of medical images: median filter to eliminate noise and mediation. Presentation types of noise in images. Identification of a suitable type of noise filtering.

• # 5 Method detection / extraction of edges using a Gaussian classical operators, Laplace, Sobel, Prewitt, etc. Kirsh. Methods to improve the contours (edges accent).

• # 6 Methods of segmentation. Binarization. Image processing based on information in the histogram (multiprag segmentation). Erosion, dilation and scheletizarea images.

• # 7 Collection and view ECG cardiac electrical signal, a signal that lung using medical equipment BIOPAC MP150 System. Familiarity with the types of ECG signal collection. Elements of interpretation of the signals of electrocardiography.

• # 8 Detection of ventricular arrhythmias based on digital analysis of ECG signals: detection and rejection of noise, QRS detection, QRS complex classification by analysis of heart rate (ventricular).

• #9 AI Presentation - instrumentation amplifier using the scheme and requirements gathering, processing and measurement of biological signals (frequency band, rejection), measuring voltage offset, drift voltage and output voltage, common mode calculation of rejection.

• #10 Making Noise complete calculations (determining the equivalent noise voltage and current noise by calculating the excess heat and noise, noise factor calculation, the optimum generator resistance). Checking results using a program developed in Excel.

• # 11 Introducing the IA scheme of SDS, respectively FTJ to operate in a specified frequency band. Introduction of a Notch filter to remove line frequency of 50Hz. Predicting the perturbations of the preamplifier.

• # 12 Investigation of the effect on vascular Doppler ultrasound, Doppler device using PDO-PROGETTI Small, presentation Doppler system block diagram (main purpose: to familiarize students with specialized medical equipment. Electronic stimulation of tissue, tissue reaction to stimulation. Multipurpose use of electromyography 4 channels Myto II.

• # 13 Teaching micro-projects, performing measurements on AI made by students and determine the characteristics and achieved (voltage offset, drift voltage, output voltage, common mode rejection)

• # 14 micro-projects, assess the laboratory work during the semester, lab sessions recovery

Micro-projects (the theme of practice)

1. Design, development and testing of an instrumentation amplifier electrocardiography. Calculation of noise completely. Calculation of offset voltage and drift. Realistic estimate of the disturbance (Testing will be done in the lab).

2. Design of 2D signal processing algorithms (biomedical imaging), making theoretical study, algorithm implementation, testing different sets of input data, presenting findings on the methods implemented and their influential processed signals.

Base material

• Network of eight computers for development programs in Excel, C + +.

• 5 oscilloscopes, signal generators 4, 5 food sources for checking and measuring instrumentation amplifier features - AI.

• SMALL-PDO PROGETTI - portable laboratory equipment for the collection of ECG cardiac electrical signals, signal lung EPG - Spirometer for vascular investigation by the Doppler effect.

• Microscope slides with different types of cells.

• Miografic Electro-stimulator. Sinusoidal output signal, rectangular and triangular shape (in mono-pulse or pulse train) with adjustable frequency and amplitude (in 1Hz ranges .... 10KHz, 1V .... 0.01V respectively) to electrical stimulation of tissues.

• BIOPAC - System Software User PM150System MP150WSW + for Windows (www.biopac.com)

o EBI100C - Electrical Bioimpedance Amplifier

o EGG100C - Electrograstrogram Amplifier

o EEG100C - System Light BE 28 purchase electroencephalographic

• 4-channel multi Myto Electromyography II

Total hours 28 hours applications

10. Selective Bibliography

1. HN Teodorescu - "Medical Electronics", Course Notes, TU Iasi, 2001

2. R. Strungaru - "Medical Electronics" , Didactic and pedagogical, Bucharest, 1982

3. TDGligor, A. Policec, O. Bartos, V. Goian - Electronic Medical Devices, Facla Publishing House, Cluj-Napoca, 1988

4. A. Policec, TDGligor, Gh Ciocloda - "Medical Electronics", Editura Dacia, 1983.

5. HN Teodorescu and LC Jain (Eds.): Intelligent Technologies in Rehabilitation ", CRC Press, Florida, USA, 520 pp + xvi, December 2000 ISBN: 0849301408

6. HN Teodorescu, D. Mlynek, A. Kandel, HJ Zimmermann (Eds.): ” IIntelligent Systems and Interfaces ”, 480pp., ISBN: 079237763X, Kluwer Academic Press, Boston.2000

7. HN Teodorescu, A. Kandel and LC Jain (Eds.): Soft Computing in Human-Related Sciences, CRC Press, Florida, USA, 381 pp xxvii + 28 (ISBN 0-8493-1635-9 begin_of_the_skype_highlightin end_of_the_skype_h) May 1999

8. HN Teodorescu, A. Kandel and LC Jain (Eds.): Fuzzy and Neuro-Fuzzy Systems in Medicine. CRC Press, Florida, USA, 394 pp.+ xxviii , (ISBN0-8493-9806-1), 1998

9. Schmitt, M., Teodorescu, H.-N ., Jain, A., Jain, A., Jain, S., Jain, LC (Eds.): „ Computational Intelligence Processing in Medical Diagnosis ”, Springer-Verlag, XX, 496 pp. 103 figs., 49 tabs. ISBN 3-7908-1463-6. Series: Studies in Fuzziness and Soft Computing. Vol. 96. Springer-Verlag Heidelberg. 2002.

Notes: All references, including current rates are copyright protected - rights of the author or publisher shall be protected by law. Materials may not be copied or reproduced or stored in any way.

Signatures:

Date: Course tought by: Prof. dr. Horia-Nicolai Teodorescu MC AR

Applications tought by: Teaching assist: Zbancioc Marius-Dan

S y l l a b u s VLSI CIRCUITS FOR RADIOFREQUENCY

1. Lecturer: professor assistant eng. Radu Gabriel Bozomitu 2. Course type: DE EDOS412A 3. Course structure:

Semester No. hours/week No. hours/semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 8 2 2 C 28 28 56

4. Course objectives: - The course is intended to offer knowledge on VLSI radiofrequency circuits design; - To provide students knowledge on the structure of VLSI radiofrequency circuits; - To provide students knowledge to develop and design different types of VLSI radiofrequency circuits; - To provide students the necessary skills to use a computer simulation program for designing electronic circuits used in VLSI circuits implementation. 5. Consistency between discipline and curriculum goals:

Course objectives are consistent with the objectives of the curriculum for the training of specialists in VLSI analog circuits domain. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical and professional skills Cognitive skills: Proficiency in theoretical developments, methodological and practical designing of the VLSI analog circuits (monolithic implementation of RF amplifiers in bipolar and CMOS technology, techniques for increasing the dynamic range of the RF amplifiers, monolithic implementation of the analog multiplier circuits in bipolar and CMOS technologies, monolithic implementation of the voltage controlled oscillators, monolithic implementation of the automatic gain control loops, monolithic implementation of the PLL and clock recovery circuits, monolithic implementation of the Gm-C active filters for RF applications, monolithic implementation of the AM and FM detector circuits, techniques of layout design for VLSI RF circuits in bipolar and CMOS technology) General skills:

- To be able to critically understand, explain and interpret the theoretical, methodological and practical developments to designing of VLSI analog circuits;

- To be able to use computer simulation programs used in the design of RF electronic circuits (at the system and schematic levels);

- To be able to select and apply appropriate behavioral models for system-level simulations;

- To have communication skills in the field of VLSI design; - To work in an international context.

Specific skills:

- To understand the theoretical principles underlying VLSI analog circuits; - To be able to design different topologies of VLSI analog circuits; - To be able to create a behavioral model suitable for a radio communication system

for system-level simulations; - To understand and use different techniques for RF circuit simulation (transient

analysis, small signal analysis, large signal analysis, total harmonic distortion calculation, etc.).

7. Teaching methods: Teaching: Oral presentation using the video-projector and case discussions. Laboratories: Completion of the computer laboratory papers and carrying out the practical laboratory subjects. Discussions based on the laboratory papers. Tracking and guidance to perform the laboratory work. Scoring on the results.

The examination requirements: knowing the course and applications subjects, oral and written examination of the students. 8. Evaluation procedure

Continuous evaluation: Activity in the seminar / laboratory / project / practice

Share of final grade: 10 %

Tests during the semester Share of final grade: 10 %

Specialty papers:

Share of final grade: 10 %

Final evaluation: Exam Share of final grade: 70 %

Evaluations: 1. Written evaluation – problems 50 %;

2. Oral evaluation, verification of theoretical knowledge 50 %; 9. Course content: a) Course: 1. Introduction to VLSI circuits for radiofrequency 2. Monolithic implementation of RF amplifiers in bipolar and CMOS technology - radiofrequency operational amplifier (OPAMP); - operational transconductance amplifier (OTA); - second generation of current conveyor (CCII); - different topologies of line drivers for RF applications; 3. Techniques for increasing the dynamic range of the RF amplifiers - local linearization techniques; - ELIN types techniques; 4. Monolithic implementation of the analog multiplier circuits in bipolar and CMOS technologies - analog multiplier on the base of differential pair;

- Gilbert cell as analog multiplier. 5. Monolithic implementation of the voltage controlled oscillators (VCO) - ring oscillators; - different topologies of VCO; 6. Monolithic implementation of the automatic gain control (AGC) loops 7. Monolithic implementation of the PLL and clock recovery circuits (CRC) - PLL with analog multiplier phase detector; - charge pump PLL; - different topologies of CRC circuits; - quadricorelator CRC; 8. Monolithic implementation of the Gm-C active filters for RF applications - design of RF active filers in different approximations (Cebisev, Butterworth, Bessel); - synthesis of the Gm-C active filters on the base of biquad cells; - switched-capacitors filters; 9. Monolithic implementation of the AM and FM detector circuits - envelope detectors; - FM detector on the base of PLL; - BPSK detectors. 10. Techniques of layout design for VLSI RF circuits in bipolar and CMOS technology; - techniques for corners simulations; - techniques for parasitic extraction; - techniques for post-layout simulations; Total courses ......................... 28 hours b) Applications:

Laboratory + Project Necessary soft: „Cadence” – or „OrCAD” – for schematic and „LEdit” – for layout. 1. RF amplifiers design 2. Implementation of different techniques for increasing the dynamic range of the RF amplifiers 3. Monolithic implementation of the automatic gain control (AGC) loops 4. Monolithic implementation of the PLL and clock recovery circuits (CRC) 5. Monolithic implementation of the Gm-C active filters for RF applications 6. Monolithic implementation of the AM and FM detector circuits

7. Layout design techniques Project: Design a VLSI RF circuit at schematic and layout level.

Total applications ..................... 28 hours

10. Selective references:

[1] Behzad Razavi, “Design of Analog CMOS Integrated Circuits”, McGraw-Hill, Inc. 1221 Avenue of The Americas, New York, NY, 10020, 2001; [2] Kenneth R. Laker, Willy M. C. Sansen, „Design of Analog Integrated Circuits and Systems”, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1994; [3] David Johns, Ken Martin, „Analog Integrated Circuit Design”, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1997; [4] C. Toumazou, F. J. Lidgey, and D. G. Haigh (eds.), „Analogue IC Design: The Current-Mode Approach”, London: Peter Peregrinus Ltd., 1990; [5] Thomas Lee, “The Design of CMOS Radio-Frequency Integrated Circuits”, The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge CB2 2RU, United Kingdom, 1998; [6] Paul R. Gray, Robert G. Meyer, „Circuite Integrate Analogice - Analiză şi Proiectare”, Edit. Tehnică, Bucureşti, 1999; [7] Roubik Gregorian, Gabor C. Temes, “Analog CMOS Integrated Circuits for Signal Processing”, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1986; [8] L. P. Huelsman and P. E. Allen, „Introduction to the Theory and Design of Active Filters”, New York: McGraw-Hill Inc., 1980; [9] R. Schaumann, S. M. Ghausi and K. R. Laker, „Design of Analog Filters: Passive, Active RC and Switched Capacitor”, Pretince-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1990; [10] Rainer Nawrocki, „Electronically Controlled OTA-C Filter with Follow-the-Leader-Feedback Structure”, International Journal of Circuit Theory and Applications, vol. 16, pp. 93-96, 1998; [11] D. R. Frey, „Log domain filtering for RF applications”, IEEE J. Solid-State Circ., vol. 31, pp. 1468-1475, Oct. 1996; [12] Douglas R. Frey, „State-Space Synthesis and Analysis of Log-Domain Filters”, IEEE Trans. Circuits and Systems - II: Analog and Digital Signal Processing, vol. 45, no. 9, pp. 1205-1211, Sept. 1998; [13] Yannis Tsividis, „Externally Linear, Time-Invariant Systems and Their Application to Companding Signal Processors”, IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems - II: Analog and Digital Signal Processing, vol. 44, no. 2, pp. 65-85, February 1997; [14] A. Fabre, „Third-generation current conveyor: A new helpful active element“, Electron. Lett., vol. 31, no. 5, pp. 338-339, Mar. 1995; [15] Hanspeter Schmid, „Approximating the Universal Active Element”, IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems - II: Analog and Digital Signal Processing, vol. 47, no. 11, pp. 1160-1169, November 2000; [16] Behzad Razavi, “A 2.5-Gb/s 15-mW Clock Recovery Circuit”, IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 31, No. 4, April 1996; [17] Michael John Sebastian Smith, „Application-Specific Integrated Circuits”, Addison Wesley Longman, Inc., 1999; [18] Alan Hastings, “The Art of Analog Layout”, Prentice-Hall, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458, 2001.

20.01.2011

Professor assistant eng. Radu Gabriel Bozomitu, PhD

S y l l a b u s RADIO-TRANSMITTERS AND RADIO-RECEIVERS

1. Lecturer: professor assistant eng. Radu Gabriel Bozomitu 2. Course type: elective (DE) EDOS412B 3. Course structure:

Semester No. hours/week No. hours/semester

C S L P

Final examination

C S L P Total 8 2 2 C 28 28 56

4. Course objectives: - The course is intended to offer knowledge on radio-transmitters and radio-receivers analysis and design; - To provide students knowledge on the structure of radio-transmitters and radio-receivers; - To provide students knowledge to develop and design radio-transmission and radio-reception equipments and systems; - To provide students the necessary skills to use a computer simulation program for designing electronic circuits used in radio-transmitters and radio-receivers implementation. 5. Consistency between discipline and curriculum goals:

Course objectives are consistent with the objectives of the curriculum for the training of specialists in telecommunications domain. 6. Learning outcomes expressed in cognitive, technical and professional skills Cognitive skills:

Proficiency in theoretical developments, methodological and practical designing of the modern radio communications systems (radio-transmitters and radio-receivers systems designing, radio waves propagation, design of classes A, B, C, D, E and F power RF amplifiers, passive components used in RF circuits, narrow band and wide band circuits designing, transmission lines transformers designing, noise analysis of the radio-communications systems, radio-receivers characteristics and configurations, mixers designing, RF oscillators designing, analog and digital modulations, frequency synthesis). General skills:

- To be able to critically understand, explain and interpret the theoretical, methodological and practical developments to designing of the modern radio-transmitters and radio-receivers systems;

- To be able to use computer simulation programs used in the design of RF electronic circuits (at the system and schematic levels);

- To be able to select and apply appropriate behavioral models for system-level simulations;

- To have communication skills in the field of radio-communications; - To work in an international context.

Specific skills: - To understand the theoretical principles underlying radio-transmitters and radio-

receivers systems; - To be able to design radio-transmitters and radio-receivers systems; - To be able to create a behavioral model suitable for a radio communication system

for system-level simulations; - To understand and use different techniques for RF circuit simulation (transient

analysis, small signal analysis, large signal analysis, total harmonic distortion calculation, etc.).

7. Teaching methods: Teaching: Oral presentation using the video-projector and case discussions. Laboratories: Completion of the computer laboratory papers and carrying out the practical laboratory subjects. Discussions based on the laboratory papers. Tracking and guidance to perform the laboratory work. Scoring on the results.

The examination requirements: knowing the course and applications subjects, oral and written examination of the students. 8. Evaluation procedure

Continuous evaluation: Activity in the seminar / laboratory / project / practice

Share of final grade: 10 %

Tests during the semester Share of final grade: 10 %

Specialty papers:

Share of final grade: 10 %

Final evaluation: Exam Share of final grade: 70 %

Evaluations: 1. Written evaluation – problems 50 %;

2. Oral evaluation, verification of theoretical knowledge 50 %; 9. Course content: a) Course:

Part I. Radio-transmitters Chapter 1. RADIO-TRANSMITTERS CLASSIFICATION 1.1. RT classification by power 1.2. RT classification by frequency range 1.3. RT classification by purpose and terms of use 1.4. RT classification by emission characteristics Chapter 2. RADIO WAVES 2.1. Introduction. Electromagnetic field. Electromagnetic waves 2.2. Radio spectrum 2.3. Basics of radio waves characteristics 2.4. Reflection, refraction, dispersion and diffraction of electromagnetic waves

2.4.1. Electromagnetic waves reflection and refraction 2.4.2. Electromagnetic waves diffraction 2.4.3. Electromagnetic waves dispersion

2.5. Earth and atmospheric features that influence the propagation of EM waves

2.5.1. Earth Surface 2.5.2. Terrestrial atmosphere

2.6. Basics of radio wave propagation 2.6.1. General aspects 2.6.2. EM field propagation in the waveguide (bands SLF, ULF, VLF) 2.6.3. EM field propagation of surface waves 2.6.4. EM wave propagation in high frequency band (3 - 30MHz) 2.6.5. EM field propagation of space waves

2.7. Antenna basics 2.7.1. Operating principles of transmission antennas 2.7.2. Radiation diagram of transmission antennas 2.7.3. Antennas gain 2.7.4. Equivalent surface of reception antenna 2.7.5. Input impedance

2.8. The relationship between transmitter power and receiver sensitivity 2.9. Relative levels (dB, Np) and absolute levels (dBW, dBm, dBu) Chapter 3. POWER RF AMPLIFIERS (PRFA) 3.1. Generalities. The operating mode of the active device in PRFA

3.1.1. General aspects 3.1.2. RFA transistor. Transistor load in RFA 3.1.3. Operating modes of the transistor in PRFA

3.1.3.1. Linear regime of active device in RFA 3.1.3.2. Nonlinear regime of transistor in RFA

3.1.4. Load influence on dynamic characteristic 3.2. Transistor classes of operation in harmonic regime

3.2.1. Class A PRFA 3.2.2. Class B PRFA 3.2.3. Class C PRFA

3.3. PRFA in harmonic regime with push-pull transistors 3.4. PRFA with switching transistors

3.4.1. Class D PRFA 3.4.1.1. Principles of class D PRFA 3.4.1.2. Push-pull class D PRFA

3.4.2. Class E PRFA 3.4.3. Class F PRFA

Chapter 4. EMISSION TRANSISTORS 4.1. Generalities 4.2. Emission bipolar transistors

4.2.1. Maximum frequency and collector – base voltage 4.2.2. Emitter periphery stressing 4.2.3. Operation particularities of bipolar transistors PRFA 4.2.4. Frequency variation of the current gain

4.2.4.1. Ideal transistor model 4.2.4.2. Frequency variation of the current gain

Chapter 5. PASSIVE COMPONENTS USED IN RF CIRCUITS 5.1. Passive and active components and sources. Models 5.2. RF inductors

5.2.1. RF inductors modelling 5.2.2. Characteristics parameters (specific quantities) of RF inductors 5.2.3. RF inductors technology

5.2.3.1. Small signal inductors 5.2.3.2. Powered inductors 5.2.3.3. Shock inductors

5.2.4. RF transformers 5.2.4.1. Coupled inductors 5.2.4.2. Ideal transformer. Equivalent schematics 5.2.4.3. Real transformer. Equivalent schematics

5.2.4.4. Marking convention of the coupled inductors terminals 5.2.5. Autotransformer

5.2.5.1. RF transformers designing. Utilizations 5.3. Radiofrequency capacitors 5.3.1. RF capacitors modeling 5.3.2. Characteristics parameters (specific quantities) of RF capacitors 5.3.3. RF behaviour of capacitors 5.3.4. Types of capacitors

5.3.4.1. RF capacitors of general use 5.3.4.2. Powered and high voltage RF capacitors

Chapter 6. POWER RADIOFREQUENCY AMPLIFIER CIRCUITS 6.1. Voltage supplying of bipolar transistors PRFA

6.1.1. Voltage supplying of transistors PRFA 6.2. Matching resonant circuits in PRFA

6.2.1. Generalities. Matching circuits functions 6.2.2. Passive components used in the ARFP resonant circuits 6.2.3. Calculation of the narrow band matching cells

6.3. Narrow band PRFA circuits 6.3.1. Coupling of narrow band PRFA stages 6.3.2. Wide band matching transformers 6.3.3. Transmission lines transformers - TLT

6.3.3.1. Generalities. TLT connection into circuit 6.3.3.2. TLT operating principle 6.3.3.3. Simple configuration of TLT and autotransformer TLT (ATLT) 6.3.3.4. Operation of 1:1 transforming ratio TLT 6.3.3.5. Operation of different from 1:1 transforming ratio TLT 6.3.3.6. Operation of TLT in autotransformer connection (ATLT) 6.3.3.7. TLT designing and construction

Part II. Radio-receivers Chapter 1. RADIO-RECEIVERS CLASSIFICATION 1.1. RR classification by purpose 1.2. RR classification by operation principle 1.3. RR classification by modulation type Chapter 2. RADIO-RECEIVERS CHARACTERISTICS Section 2.02 2.1. Input characteristics

2.1.1. Sensibility Section 2.03 2.1.2. Fidelity 2.1.3. Selectivity 2.1.4. Input signal dynamic range 2.1.5. Parasitic signals and responses

2.1.5.1. Image frequency signal attenuation 2.2. Output characteristics

2.2.1. Frequency accuracy and stability 2.2.2. Tuning time 2.2.3. Perturbation electromagnetic signals generated by RR 2.2.4. Output maximum power

2.3. RF circuits noise 2.3.1. Noise transmission through linear systems. Noise band 2.3.2. Noise factor (F). Noise figure (NF) 2.3.3. Signal noise ratio 2.3.4. Operation noise factor

Article III. Chapter 3. RADIO-RECEIVERS CONFIGURATIONS

3.1. Radio-receivers configurations on the operation principle 3.1.1. Simple detection receiver 3.1.2. Direct amplification receiver 3.1.3. Feedback and super-feedback receiver

3.1.4. Reflex receiver 3.1.5. Superheterodyne receiver 3.1.6. Double conversion receiver 3.1.7. Direct conversion receiver 3.1.8. Digital receivers 3.1.9. Repeaters

3.2. Radio-receivers configurations on the detection type 3.2.1. FM receiver 3.2.2. AM – FM receiver

3.3. Stereo transmission system Article IV.

Article V. Chapter 4. INPUT CIRCUITS 4.1. Antennas and antenna matching circuit

4.1.1. Main characteristics of the receiving antennas 4.1.2. Standard antenna 4.1.3. Ferrite antenna

4.2. Analysis of input circuits 4.2.1. Capacitive tuning input circuit 4.2.2. Inductive tuning input circuit

Article VI. 4.2.3. Input circuit connecting with the first amplifier device 4.2.3.1. Voltage coupling coefficient 4.2.3.2. Magnetic or mutual inductance coupling

Article VII. 4.2.3.3. Autotransformer coupling Article VIII. 4.2.3.4. Capacitive coupling

4.2.4. Load coupling effect on the input circuit Article IX.

Article X. Chapter 5. MIXERS 5.1. Frequency shifting principle

5.1.1. Additive frequency shifting 5.2. Mixer amplification 5.3. Additive mixers

5.3.1. Additive mixers with bipolar transistors (a) 5.3.2. Additive mixers with field effect transistors

(b) 5.4. Multiplicative mixers 5.4.1. Multiplicative mixer with differential pair Section 10.02 5.4.2. Balanced mixer 5.4.3. Double balanced mixer

(a) 5.5. Mixer with diodes in commutation 5.5.1. Mixer with diodes in simple commutation 5.5.2. Mixer with ring connected diodes

Chapter 6. LOCAL OSCILLATOR 6.1. General aspects

6.1.1. Requirements for local oscillator 6.1.2. General condition of oscillation

6.2. Phase (frequency) stability 6.3. Amplitude condition

6.3.1. Limiting amplitude oscillations 6.4. Magnetic coupling LC oscillators

6.4.1. LC oscillators with bipolar transistors and magnetic coupling 6.5. Oscillators with differential pair 6.6. Oscillation frequency and amplitude stability

6.6.1. Oscillation frequency stability 6.6.2. Oscillation amplitude stability

Article XI. Article XII. Chapter 7. INTERMEDIATE FREQUENCY AMPLIFIERS (IFA)

7.1. Basic characteristics. Quality indices. Requirements. Classifications 7.1.1. The main characteristics, quality indices and some requirements for IFA 7.1.2. IFA classification

Article XIII. 7.2. IFA stages with LC circuits as load 7.2.1. Voltage and power amplification 7.2.2. Selectivity characteristics

7.3. IFA stages with coupling circuits as load

7.3.1. Tuning circuit coupling

7.3.2. Frequency characteristic

7.3.3. Frequency bandwidth 7.4. IFA with concentrated amplification and selectivity

7.5. Piezoceramic filters

7.5.1. Piezoelectric resonators

7.5.2. Monolithic filters

Chapter 8. DEMODULATORS 8.1. Classifications. Quality indices. Requirements 8.2. AM envelope demodulators

8.2.1. The operating principle of the envelope demodulator 8.2.2. AM demodulator operation analysis 8.2.3. Distortion of the envelope demodulator

8.3. Frequency discriminators 8.3.1. The operating principle of the discriminators 8.3.2. FM – AM modulation transformer 8.3.3. Phase detector 8.3.4. Frequency detector

Article XIV. 8.4. FM signals demodulation with PLL

Article XV. Chapter 9. FREQUENCY SYNTHESIZERS 9.1. Frequency synthesis by indirect method

9.1.1. Principle method Article XVI. 9.1.2. Phase locked loop circuits by type 1 and second order Article XVII. 9.1.3. Phase locked loop circuits by type 2 and second order

9.2. Direct digital synthesis (DDS) 9.2.1. Principle method 9.2.2. Modulation 9.2.3. DDS parameters

9.3. Direct analog synthesis 9.4. Comparative analysis Chapter 10. DIGITAL MODULATIONS 10.1. PCM systems 10.2. Communication systems with digital modulation

10.2.1. ASK signals 10.2.2. FSK signals 10.2.3. PSK signals

10.3. Detection of binary signals ASK, FSK and PSK 10.3.1. Incoherent ASK detection 10.3.2. FSK signals detection 10.3.3. PSK signals coherent detection

10.4. QPSK signals 10.5. MSK signals Chapter 11. TDA 5210 INTEGRATED CIRCUIT 11.1. Low-noise amplifier (LNA) 11.2. Automatic gain control circuit (AGC) 11.3. Mixer 11.4. PLL synthesizer 11.5. Reference oscillator 11.6. Intermediate frequency amplifier 11.7. Intermediate frequency filtering 11.8. Limiter 11.9. ASK/FSK switch functional description 11.10. Demodulation

11.10.1. ASK demodulation 11.10.2. FSK demodulation

11.11. Data filtering 11.12. Data slicer 11.13. Spurious radiation Total courses ......................... 28 hours b) Applications:

Laboratory + Project 1. PRFA designing 2. Wide band matching transformers 3. Transmission lines transformers - TLT 4. Circuits for summing powers provided by PRFA 5. Frequency multipliers 6. Quartz – controlled oscillators 7. RF oscillators 8. Balanced modulators 9. Balanced modulators with diodes 10. Communication systems with single side band 11. AM detection 12. PLL frequency synthesis 13. FM detection 14. Automatic gain control radiofrequency circuit

Total applications ..................... 28 hours

10. Selective references: [1] D. F. Bartlett and T. R. Core, „Measuring Maxwell’s Displacement Current Inside a Capacitor”,

Physical Review Letters, Vol. 55, No. 1, July, 1985; [2] D. F. Bartlett and Glenn Gengel, „Measurement of quasistatic Maxwell’s displacement current”,

Physical Review A, vol. 39, No. 3, February 1, 1989; [3] Sophocles J. Orfanidis, „Electromagnetic Waves and Antennas”, Rutgers University, 2008; [4] Robert E. Collin, „Antennas and Radiowave Propagation”, McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1985; [5] Constantine A. Balanis, „Antenna theory: Analysis and design”, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1997; [6] T. Lee, „The Design of CMOS Radio-Frequency Integrated Circuits”, Cambridge, Cambridge

University Press, 1998; [7] Grebennikov, A., Sokal, N. O., „Switch mode RF Power Amplifiers”, Elsevier Inc., 2007; [8] Kazimierczuk, M. K., „RF Power Amplifiers”, J. Wiley & Sons, 2008; [9] Steve C. Cripps, „Advanced Techniques in RF Power Amplifier Design”, Artech House, Inc., 2002; [10] J. Sewick, „Transmission Line Transformers”, American Radio Relay League, 1990; [11] Paul R. Gray, Robert G. Meyer, „Circuite Integrate Analogice - Analiză şi Proiectare”, Editura

Tehnică, Bucureşti, 1999; [12] David Johns, Ken Martin, „Analog Integrated Circuit Design”, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1997; [13] Vlad Cehan, „Bazele radioemiţătoarelor” – Editura MatrixRom, Bucureşti, 1997; [14] Vlad Cehan, „Radiocomunicaţii digitale. Vol. I, Radiocomunicaţii”, Editura Stef, Iaşi, 2006; [15] Kenneth R. Laker, Willy M. C. Sansen, „Design of Analog Integrated Circuits and Systems”,

McGraw-Hill, New York, 1994; [16] C. Toumazou, F. J. Lidgey, and D. G. Haigh (eds.), „Analogue IC Design: The Current-Mode

Approach”, London: Peter Peregrinus Ltd., 1990; [17] Behzad Razavi, „Design of Analog CMOS Integrated Circuits”, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, Inc.,

2001; [18] Kevin McClaning, Tom Vito, „Radio Receiver Design”, Noble Publishing Corporation, 2000; [19] B. Carlson, „Communication Systems”, McGraw-Hill, 1986; [20] Jack R. Smith, „Modern Communication Circuits”, McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 1998;

[21] K. K. Clarke, D. T. Hess, „Communication Circuits: Analysis and Design”, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Reading Massachusetts, 1971;

[22] Alan Bensky, „Short-range Wireless Communication. Fundamentals of RF System Design and Application”, Elsevier’s Science & Technology, Inc., 2004;

[23] Gheorghe Maxim, „Radiorecepţie”, Vol. I, Editura Institutului Politehnic Iaşi, 1985; [24] Vlad Cehan, Radu Gabriel Bozomitu, „Bazele Radioemisiei - Îndrumar de laborator”, Editura Stef,

Iaşi, 2002; [25] Radu Gabriel Bozomitu, „Tehnici de liniarizare pentru circuitele integrate de radiofrecvenţă”,

Editura Fundaţiei Academice AXIS, Iaşi, 2009; [26] Věnceslav F. Kroupa, „Direct Digital Frequency Synthesizers”, IEEE Press, Piscataway, NJ 08855-

1331 U.S.A., 1999; [27] Simon Haykin, „Digital Communications”, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1988; [28] TDA 5210, Specification and Application Note, http://www.infineon.com/cms/en/product/index.html.

01.12.2010

Professor assistant eng. Radu Gabriel Bozomitu, PhD

03 febr. 2011- Intocmit, Ing. Cătălin Purice